Fuel stabilizer

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by sboricic123, Apr 17, 2013.

  1. sboricic123

    sboricic123 Member

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    How many add fuel stabilizer constantly in the fuel you add to your 2 stroke engine?
    I've been reading that the ethanol in gas in 2 stroke engines can cause problems.
    Attached is a link with a write up and more information for those not aware of it.
    http://www.jackssmallengines.com/fuelissues.cfm
     
  2. bigbutterbean

    bigbutterbean New Member

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    The effects of ethanol are DRASTICALLY over-exaggerated. Are there some harmful effects of ethanol? Sure, but they occur over a much longer period of time than the opponents of ethanol would lead us to believe.
     
  3. Drewd

    Drewd New Member

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    Bingo! Butterbean his this one out of the park. Zero problems here with E10 fuel in any of my machines to include snowmobiles, ATVs, motorized bikes, generators, weedwhackers, snowthrower, leaf blower, tiller, and model airplane engines. If in the mood, I'll add a couple of ounces of 2 stroke oil per 5 gallons of gas to improve fuel lubricity.

    The only additive I use is for storage. I'll run a double dose of Stabil and run engine for 20 minutes to ensure it gets into carbs and viola, I'm good for a long time. I don't even bother draining the carbs anymore with stabil.
     
  4. Wickedest1

    Wickedest1 Member

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    I personally dont use it...my gas never lasts...i usually only get 2gallons of 93 octane at a time...so maybe if I bought 5 gallons id consider it...but even the higher octane gas doesn't in my opinion cause issues...maybe over like 50k miles but I doubt there's many if any members whose engines are there...
     
  5. andrewflores17

    andrewflores17 New Member

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    if my fuel is sitting around for longer than a month i will add it with winter rideing being so sparse for me i usually do add it to play it safe .

    with my little tanaka i always add it i ride the 4 strokes more so i dont worry about them sitting as much .

    ive seen gasoline after its sits for to long looks like red wine runs like it to .

    i always add just a little seafoam to all my gas cans seafoam does wanders to my old toyota and it wont hurt my little bikes either .
     
  6. bigbutterbean

    bigbutterbean New Member

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    Let me also clarify what fuel stabilizers do. They don't neutralize or remove ethanol from gasoline, so its going to burn the same with or without fuel stabilizers (unless the gas is old and has no stabilizer). What the stabilizers do is stop the water attraction caused by ethanol, and keep the gas from going bad while sitting. That's really all they do. So please just don't think that fuel stabilizers do anything magical.
     
  7. Len455

    Len455 New Member

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    What does seafoam do for it?
     
  8. bigbutterbean

    bigbutterbean New Member

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    The same thing any other fuel stabilizer does, which I just described in my previous post.
     
  9. NJZ

    NJZ New Member

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    I run 3.6 ounces of still HD 2 stroke oil, and 1 ounce of Seafoam to every gallon of gas being 93 I mix and it runs awesome when I don't have a bad magneto.

    I run Seafoam in my outboard fuel as well. Haven't ran any Oxygenated VP yet. But will try eventually. I received bike used. Ran break in fuel, and put 200 or so miles on it in a week. While it has been down I port matched and lapped head. Jetted to about 67 according to the conversion chart before jetting and mag quit completely just the "smoothing of the rough" smoothed the little lady a bunch. Cant wait to see how she goes in a day or two.
     
  10. andrewflores17

    andrewflores17 New Member

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    Safely helps quiet noisy lifters, helps remove fuel deposits and oil residue, helps smooth rough idle. For Carburetors or Fuel Injected Gasoline Engines – Autos – Trucks – Tractors – Motorcycles – Marine – Small Engines – Industrial Engines Great for Diesel Engines Too!

    http://www.seafoamsales.com/sea-foam-motor-treatment/

    sea foam is one of those gimmicky things that actually work i use i even add it to my oil right before i change it suposed to clean out all the nasties
     
  11. Jesse_James

    Jesse_James New Member

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    The guy who build my bike said for me to use startron but its so expensive is it worth it?


    Unrelated... so it is ok to run a high octane gas in a 2 stroke engine? or is that bad?
     
  12. sboricic123

    sboricic123 Member

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    Jesse James, some previous posts here mention 93, which is high octane. So I'm assuming it is okay. I use it in my outdoor equipment (lawnmowers, chainsaw, weed wacker, rototiller, etc.) once in a while.
    Don't quote me on that though.
     
  13. fredric3144

    fredric3144 New Member

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    I didn't know anything about ethanol fuel until my dad bought some canned gas for his chainsaw and told me ethanol was bad for 2 stroke engines . I have over 1000 miles on my 66cc china girl engine running 89 octane 20 to 1 mix and no problems . Have I just been lucky or is this the same with everyone else ???
     
  14. curtisfox

    curtisfox Well-Known Member

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    For what its worth my son went to co;age for small engine for 3 years and it was said to run non- Oxygenated fuel,high octane and use a additive in all small engines I use the sea-foam................Curt
     
  15. maniac57

    maniac57 Old, Fat, and still faster than you

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    Fuel these days is garbage. I see more carb and fuel system problems than any other failure on autos, bicycles, and motorcycles!
    Using additives is more expensive in the short term, but rebuilding your engine is MORE costly.
    I've always had great results from SeaFoam products....Sta-bil also works quite well.
     
  16. Greg58

    Greg58 Well-Known Member

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    From what I've heard from a few good mechanics the harm to auto engines happens if the vehicle sits for a while and the fuel sepperates, since alcohol is higher octane than gasoline the higher octane fuel has more. Alcohol being water based will settle to the bottom of the tank and be burned off first, leaving very low octane fuel that can damage the engine. On small engines most carburator gaskets and seals were not designed for alcohol and swell or deteriate causing leaks or problems. I replaced the carburetor on my 70 GMC with a edelbrock in 2012, the instructions stated that using ethanol would void the warranty.
     
  17. Agreen

    Agreen Member

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    If I may, let me put some myths to rest. Ethanol fuels will not harm your engine, nor will they harm your carburetors or fuel tanks... when constantly in use. If you allow the fuel to sit for an extended period of time, it starts to soak in water. The moisture, along with oxygen is what causes the corrosion, not the fuel.

    Now, about the high octane fuels. Octane ratings describe the fuel's resistance to knock. Knock is when the fuel mixture ignites in such a manner to make an explosion instead of combustion. Think of combustion as a controlled release of the fuel's energy, explosion being a complete release all at once. So in general terms, the higher the octane, the slower the fuel burns. This is necessary in an engine that exerts a lot of energy on the air/fuel mixture, such as a high compression or forced induction engine.

    So what foes all that mean? Essentially, if you use too high of an octane fuel in an engine that doesn't actually REQUIRE it, it results in an incomplete burn and you will waste gas money because you are not getting all the energy you can out of the fuel before it leaves the engine.

    Unless the compression ratio is high or it's forced induction, I'm running 87.
     
  18. Greg58

    Greg58 Well-Known Member

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    That sounds like what I said!
     
  19. Agreen

    Agreen Member

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    Must have said it while I was typing. I'm still getting unused to typing on a tablet lol
     
  20. fredric3144

    fredric3144 New Member

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    My 66cc does pretty good on the low octane 20 to 1 mix and I think it costs about 2.5 cents to go a mile if I switched to the expensive non-ethanol fuel at $24.00 a gallon it would be about 17.14 cents per mile . I paid $140.00 for my motor if I put 1000 miles on it I have saved enough using the low octane fuel to buy a new motor . I have about 1500 miles on my motor now and still running great . I'm going to keep running the low octane stuff and when the motor wears out just get a new one .
     

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