Found a Sweet Engine, What Now?

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by Techbiker, Apr 13, 2014.

  1. FFV8

    FFV8 New Member

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    Yes, I have only the front brake. I was planning a rear, but have not felt I needed it.

    The Big Wheel has a 2 piston caliper, on a 300mm rotor. It is a heavy machine, and the little caliper will lock the 19" motorcycle tire if you use more than two fingers on the lever:

    [​IMG]

    When I put the sidehack together, I was concerned that I was going down to a 180mm brake disc, so I planned for a rear brake. I found a 180mm rotor I thought was a bicycle rotor:

    [​IMG]

    But it was about 1mm thicker, and as you can see I had to re-drill the 6 bolt pattern. If you look at the pad marks on it, I think some of the bicycle rotors might work. As long as the braking surface is mostly round. Bike parts tend to be thin - the spandex crowd worries about grams.

    I looked around on e-bay, and found the same rotor I used. Apparently it was used on some sort of scooter:

    Scooter brake rotor

    while not a direct bolt on, it is beefier than the Avid G2 Rotor, and about the same price.

    I know there are some 290mm bike rotors out there, and that would work too. I had to remove a little forging flash from the caliper to clear the spokes - a larger diameter rotor would move the caliper away from the spokes.

    .
     
  2. 16v4nrbrgr

    16v4nrbrgr New Member

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    I'm interested to hear how the EFI conversion works out and if it's a good option for high performance motorized bicycles. I'm planning to EFI an electromechanically injected auto in the near future for similar reasons, EFI is ultimately tunable with the click of a mouse and the stroke of a key. Changing carbie jets isn't so bad on a bike since its usually close within a step or two of running great, and you don't need an ECU power source, but for finely tuned bikes which run differently according to the weather conditions like a spastic two stroke, and could be rejetted every single ride because of temp and baro changes, I could see efi being a way to get the most out of your motor without having to retune the main jet every time you decide to rip.

    Keep it up, sounds like a fun and reliable four stroke build. I recommend a rear brake just in case you gotta swerve and clamp it down in case of emergency, since a strong rear brake upsets the bike less when you need it most, and it's the first to wear out on all of my BMX's and mountain bikes that got shredded through the years.

    Cheers!
     
  3. Techbiker

    Techbiker New Member

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    16v4,

    I'm excited about the Ecotrons kit. It's so expensive though that I will be disappointed if it does not ease starting, improve efficiency, and increase engine power. I'll keep you posted on how it turns out. I intend to use Ecotron's tuning help in order to dial in the kit. We'll see if it's worth the expense, however it's a steal compared with most aftermarket tunable ECUs.

    FFV8,

    Thanks a bunch for the information. I ordered your front rotor and I am experimenting with rear options.

    My hope is to use two scooter single piston calipers and attach them to a motorcycle master cylinder. Throw should be reasonable. I am going to try a 65/35 FR bias with a 180mm rotor in front and 140mm rotor in the rear.

    I've been going through the checklist of "essentials" while my frame is at Silver State Cycles. I have ordered a 5.5" motorcycle headlight and 1933 ford model A tail light to compliment the classic look:

    [​IMG]

    The bicycle frame will be similar to the one on Silver State Cycles website:

    http://www.silverstatecycles.com/

    I think I am going to purchase this H4 LED conversion kit for the motorcycle headlight to cut down on power usage:

    http://www.electricalconnection.com/other-lighting/led-hl-h4.htm

    I've heard that LED conversion kits are hit or miss, however. Do you have any suggestions?

    Finally, I am debating turn signals for at least the rear of my bike. Do you think they are worth the cost?

    Thanks again
     
  4. FFV8

    FFV8 New Member

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    Whatever you wind up with on the brakes, keep us posted. Just remember if you want more braking force with the same lever force, you need to reduce the master cylinder bore. Once you have the calipers set up, changing a master is the easy part.

    I am running a 7" H4 light in a dietz style housing. Of course I have a lot of generator so running a 60w headlamp is no big deal.

    I am running the two bulb stop / tail lamp with no problems. I have incandescent bulbs in it, and they hold up well.

    Several people I know have killed a few LED replacement bulbs on motorcycles. Seems like vibration shakes the surface mount parts right off of the little circuit boards.

    Most of that inexpensive LED stuff comes no where near the output of the original incandescent bulbs either. In a headlamp that is not as dangerous as a tail lamp or brake light. Your brake light should be clearly visible in full sun between 11am & 2pm from 300 feet away. The tail light should be visible from the same distance at sundown.

    The final thing to consider is how the lights are powered. The pit bikes and some under 125cc street bikes powered the lights with AC power from the stator. This kept the lighting load off of the regulator & rectifier, and a bulb filament does not care AC or DC works. This also means that the lights are on anytime the engine is running - a very good idea.

    LED replacements may not run on an AC circuit. Some run at half power. Probably best to get a wiring diagram for the motorcycle your engine came out of & see how the charging system / lighting system was connected.

    My tail & head light run with the engine. My brake light runs off of the battery.

    Hope that helps.
     
  5. Techbiker

    Techbiker New Member

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    Update

    Thanks for the information.

    For simplicity-sake I am going to run everything off DC. I'm going to connect the stator directly to a quality rectifier/regulator and use a LED headlight to cut down on the load. The Plasmaglow Igniter 25w LED headlight kit seems like a good option for lighting. Have you heard anything about it?
    http://www.plasmaglow.com/led-igniters-headlight-conversion-kit/

    Here is a wiring diagram I whipped up:

    [​IMG]

    I also just received my Ricky Stator DC regulator and rectifier in the mail along with a 3700mah nimh battery! I ordered the Eastern Beaver PC-8 kit to manage all of my electronics.

    [​IMG]

    What do you think about using Harley Davidson handlebar controls? I can find sets without cruise control or radio switches. I'm not saying I will go with chrome, but here is a set:

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/201075585610?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1423.l2649

    Do you think HD is the best route to integrate horn, light, engine off, and turn signals into the handlebars? Reading motorcycle reviews, people seem to like the ergonomics of the Harley controls. Whatever route I take, I would like to purchase an entire motorcycle set if possible to improve ergonomics and reduce clutter.

    Thanks
     

    Attached Files:

    #25 Techbiker, May 11, 2014
    Last edited: May 11, 2014
  6. wret

    wret Active Member

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    Looks like you got things pretty well planned out but here's a nice diagram I found on the jockey journal.

    [​IMG]
     
  7. Techbiker

    Techbiker New Member

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    Wret,

    Thanks for the diagram. It's much nicer than mine lol! I wonder where the guy who built that stored all of his fuses?

    I have an update on the brake system. I'm thinking about installing a proportioning valve in-line before the rear caliper. That way, I can reduce pressure to the rear brake and keep 180mm rotors on both ends. Theoretically, I should be able to dial things in so that the rear does not slide.

    Do you know of the easiest way to connect a proportioning valve with 1/8 npt or 3/8-24 internal flare fittings? I'm trying to figure out how to convert this to a banjo fitting.

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/331064794079?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1423.l2649

    Maybe this style of proportioning valve isn't the greatest idea? I could always run hard lines as well.
     
  8. wret

    wret Active Member

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    Although the fuses are in different places in the diagram, in reality they can be all in the same spot. I included a 4-slot fuse block in my build and a separate terminal block tucked inside the battery box.
     
  9. Techbiker

    Techbiker New Member

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    New Parts!

    Some new components just arrived. Got a great deal on Harley handlebar controls, clutch, and front brake. I guess we'll be using 1" handlebars. Should I run the control wires internally? The Eastern Beaver PC-8 fuse box arrived as well.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    At the recommendation of Tom and Dave in my other thread http://motorbicycling.com/showthread.php?t=55126 , I'm going to use relays for the headlight and fuel pump. Thanks for the help. I will make sure to carry extra fuses.
     

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    #29 Techbiker, May 16, 2014
    Last edited: May 16, 2014

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