Clutch techniques/fine tuning

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by SavageBlunts904, Jun 4, 2012.

  1. Pilotgeek

    Pilotgeek New Member

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    --*sigh*--
     
  2. Bikeguy Joe

    Bikeguy Joe Godfather of Motorized Bicycles

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    That's what I'm sayin'.
     
  3. killercanuck

    killercanuck New Member

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    That's what I was thinking too. Going too slow with too little throttle makes the bike jump and jerk. Not sure about the chain snatch though.

    No ones had that symptom??

    My bikes do that too, some worse than others, but it mellows out after the pads and motor break in a bit. I usually run the stock 44's that come with the kits, it'd be worse with a smaller sprocket, speed wise I mean.

    It's just a quirk. Pedal faster before you let the clutch out. :p
     
  4. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    We tried, gave it our best shot...I'm done.

    Tom
     
  5. Venice Motor Bikes

    Venice Motor Bikes Custom Builder / Dealer/Los Angeles

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    I think the problem is that he's using the clutch like he's riding a motorcycle!
    SB904, you have to pedal the bicycle FIRST to build up some speed then gently let out the clutch lever. Always pedal to help the engine get up to speed! ;)
     
  6. SavageBlunts904

    SavageBlunts904 New Member

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    I guess from the replies i asked the wrong questions. Does it damage the clutch if i use it like a motorcycle. Ofc while pedaling it to speed. I have a broken hip so i cannot just haul but to 10mph very easily.
     
  7. biknut

    biknut Active Member

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    You can use it like any motorcycle clutch, but keep in mind that you don't normally take off from a stop on a motorcycle in top gear.

    If you want to drive off from a dead stop using only the clutch you need low gearing if you want your clutch pads to last very long. If you don't weight too much you can probably get away with a 44T rear sprocket for a while. More teeth would be better, but top speed will suffer.

    Another consideration is, if police see you riding away from stops without peddling, you could run into legal issues, because in Florida if your bike is self propelled it's a motor vehicle.
     
  8. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    Sorry sir, but I think your question has been answered several times and explained sufficiently. It is not a motorcycle. The clutch needs help when starting or when coming to a stop. Slipping the clutch as you might do starting off from a dead stop on a motorcycle is not a good thing. You will put a lot of wear on the clutch components. The 2 cycle bicycle engine/clutch is designed to be pedaled up to speed before engaging the clutch or be disengaged when traveling at low speeds.

    If your physical limitations will not allow you to do that there are options.

    Centrifugal clutch: Whereby the engagement is determined by engine speed. Even these, depending on rider weight will benefit from a little pedal assist.

    4 cycle engine with a transmission/centrifugal clutch. More low rpm torque is available but still it is a bicycle engine and as such starting from a dead stop or at very low speeds it might not be able to do what you want.

    I don't know any other way to explain these facts to you. Sorry if we haven't been able to offer you alternatives that will suffice. What you have and what most of us have are motorized bicycles...not motorcycles. They have to be ridden and operated differently.

    Tom
     
  9. Dan

    Dan Staff
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    Sorry to hear about the broken hip Blunt. That can't be fun.
     
  10. Nashville Kat

    Nashville Kat Active Member

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    Try this solution I just learned on another thread-

    Grease the ball bearing and the bar that is between the motor's clutch lever and the inner clutch- the stuff inside the sprocket hole-

    I can't believe what a difference it made on my 66- stopped the squeak, and surprisingly really made a difference peddaling- so you know it makes a dif to the motor!

    Anyway, it may be hanging up inside, depending on the motor RPMs.

    http://motorbicycling.com/showthread.php?t=37513&page=2
     
  11. Dan

    Dan Staff
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    Cool Kat. Never thought about it but there is a lot of friction there.
     
  12. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    If you have the equipment, you can smooth the contacting surfaces of the clutch actuator cam and the pin (bucking bar) and dramatically decrease the friction in the clutch actuating components. I use a Dremel sanding disc to round and smooth those parts then polish on a bench buffer before reassembly. Lubrication is essential on all parts, cam, bar and ball bearing. You'll be amazed at the ease with which the clutch lever pulls after you've done this simple modification.

    Tom
     
  13. SavageBlunts904

    SavageBlunts904 New Member

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    The last few posts answered exactly what i was looking for thanks cool cat and 2door. Exactly what i needed.
     

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