Chain Tensioner

Discussion in 'Hubs, Gearboxes, Sprockets and Chains' started by kkalan, Jan 30, 2013.

  1. kkalan

    kkalan New Member

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    Any one tried one of these chain tensioner that mount to the clutch cover?
    I just can't get the crappy one that comes with thte kit to sit right. It keeps drifting in and the chain rubs my wheel.
     

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  2. jji7skyline

    jji7skyline New Member

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    It's stupid, the stock tensioner. I have some wire that keeps the bolt from sliding in, and it connects to the frame.

    Try that first, might save you a few bucks :)
     
  3. Mr. Minecraft

    Mr. Minecraft Visionary

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  4. kkalan

    kkalan New Member

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    Yes, but what about the regular bike chain? Doesn't that get to tight?
     
  5. Mr. Minecraft

    Mr. Minecraft Visionary

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    Not if you do it all right. You need to set it so the regular bike chain is a bit too loose, then measure the drive chain and break it. Put it all together and you till have plenty of slack. Just remember, it is MUCH better to take off too little than to take off too much.
     
  6. chainmaker

    chainmaker Active Member

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    #6 chainmaker, Jan 31, 2013
    Last edited: Jan 31, 2013
  7. Wickedest1

    Wickedest1 Member

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    As far as the crap tensioner goes, weld it then twist it slightly so the roller lines up with the chain...thats what I did and have had no issues since...
     
  8. chainmaker

    chainmaker Active Member

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    The dropout tensioners work great as well, you need to have horizontal drop outs for them to work.
     
  9. Mr. Minecraft

    Mr. Minecraft Visionary

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    I still largely prefer no tensioner at all. The Simplicity is nice and its one less thing the chain needs to deal with.
     
  10. supercub

    supercub New Member

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    I am cutting a new chain for my bike and was thinking of ditching the tensioner. I had dogged my tensioner to the frame with a small screw so it wouldn't move. I can put a tensioner on the pedal chain if needed. My only concern is if the chain will hit the the boss under the sprocket.
     
  11. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    Just a little suggestion to those with coaster brakes planning on using a pedal side chain tensioner. You'll want the tensioner on the top chain run. When braking all of the force is applied to the bottom of the chain. That way you won't have to build such a beefy tensioner bracket. Most of us don't pedal that often and a lighter bracket will suffice for it but when braking you don't want to run the risk of a critical component failing.

    Tom
     
  12. Racko

    Racko New Member

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    Tom, do you mean the stock chain tensioner? I worry about mine because its fairly far back and and the roller is elevated quite a bit. It makes me nervous that it'll go into the wheel. For the record I have a coaster brake
     
  13. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    No, Racko. I'm saying for those who want to do away with the engine side tensioner and add a pedal side tensioner. If they install a tensioner on the pedal side it needs to be on the upper chain run, not the lower. This will give you maximum force applied to the coaster brake without relying on the strength of a tensioner bracket/sprocket.

    Tom
     
  14. Powerstroke816

    Powerstroke816 New Member

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    I just drilled a hole straight through the frame and stock one and just put a bolt through it and it stays in place.
     
  15. Mr. Minecraft

    Mr. Minecraft Visionary

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    This is the best thing to do if you cant get the perfect tension on both the engine chain and pedal chain. I need to remember this for future builds, thanks 2Door ;)
     
  16. Racko

    Racko New Member

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    Oh I gotcha! Thanks for the advice!
     
  17. Kioshk

    Kioshk Active Member

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    I see you have a Genesis Two Nine. The chainstays on this frame are rectangular, and I found it a perfect compliment to the stock-idler. It naturally stays vertical without slip.
     
  18. Cuereus

    Cuereus New Member

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    @Racko if your tensioner is far back and the roller is sitting high you may want to look at taking out a link or two from your chain
     

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