battery news

deacon

minor bike philosopher
Jan 15, 2008
8,117
3
0
north carolina
There is a new battery technology out there just been patented by some guys from stanford. I didn't save the address darn it but its really big they say. Will raise battery capacity by 400% with no weight gain. Keep an eye out over the next couple of years
 

deacon

minor bike philosopher
Jan 15, 2008
8,117
3
0
north carolina
It sure would be for me I would love to go back to all electric bikes. My problem with them was the range nothing more. I think I could work out a chain drive for it now. I am going to be playing with that for a while now.
 

paul

Well-Known Member
Dec 23, 2007
5,548
39
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Kalamazoo, MI
awesome. here is the article for those that want to read it. they sometime disapear from the net so did a copy paste

Stanford Report, December 18, 2007
Nanowire battery can hold 10 times the charge of existing lithium-ion battery

BY DAN STOBER
Printable VersionCourtesy Nature Nanotechnology

Photos taken by a scanning electron microscope of silicon nanowires before (left) and after (right) absorbing lithium. Both photos were taken at the same magnification. The work is described in “High-performance lithium battery anodes using silicon nanowires,” published online Dec. 16 in Nature Nanotechnology.
Stanford researchers have found a way to use silicon nanowires to reinvent the rechargeable lithium-ion batteries that power laptops, iPods, video cameras, cell phones, and countless other devices.

The new technology, developed through research led by Yi Cui, assistant professor of materials science and engineering, produces 10 times the amount of electricity of existing lithium-ion, known as Li-ion, batteries. A laptop that now runs on battery for two hours could operate for 20 hours, a boon to ocean-hopping business travelers.

"It's not a small improvement," Cui said. "It's a revolutionary development."

The breakthrough is described in a paper, "High-performance lithium battery anodes using silicon nanowires," published online Dec. 16 in Nature Nanotechnology, written by Cui, his graduate chemistry student Candace Chan and five others.

The greatly expanded storage capacity could make Li-ion batteries attractive to electric car manufacturers. Cui suggested that they could also be used in homes or offices to store electricity generated by rooftop solar panels.

"Given the mature infrastructure behind silicon, this new technology can be pushed to real life quickly," Cui said.

The electrical storage capacity of a Li-ion battery is limited by how much lithium can be held in the battery's anode, which is typically made of carbon. Silicon has a much higher capacity than carbon, but also has a drawback.

Silicon placed in a battery swells as it absorbs positively charged lithium atoms during charging, then shrinks during use (i.e., when playing your iPod) as the lithium is drawn out of the silicon. This expand/shrink cycle typically causes the silicon (often in the form of particles or a thin film) to pulverize, degrading the performance of the battery.

Cui's battery gets around this problem with nanotechnology. The lithium is stored in a forest of tiny silicon nanowires, each with a diameter one-thousandth the thickness of a sheet of paper. The nanowires inflate four times their normal size as they soak up lithium. But, unlike other silicon shapes, they do not fracture.

Research on silicon in batteries began three decades ago. Chan explained: "The people kind of gave up on it because the capacity wasn't high enough and the cycle life wasn't good enough. And it was just because of the shape they were using. It was just too big, and they couldn't undergo the volume changes."

Then, along came silicon nanowires. "We just kind of put them together," Chan said.

For their experiments, Chan grew the nanowires on a stainless steel substrate, providing an excellent electrical connection. "It was a fantastic moment when Candace told me it was working," Cui said.

Cui said that a patent application has been filed. He is considering formation of a company or an agreement with a battery manufacturer. Manufacturing the nanowire batteries would require "one or two different steps, but the process can certainly be scaled up," he added. "It's a well understood process."
 

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deacon

minor bike philosopher
Jan 15, 2008
8,117
3
0
north carolina
now when they are cheap enough to rival the amount of gasoline burned in six months they will be the cats pjs.
 

Pablo

Master Bike Builder & Forum Sponsor
Dec 28, 2007
3,664
5
38
Duvall, WA PNW
www.sickbikeparts.com
I was just thinking about this. Get the newest tech, most power dense battery (or batteries) with the least mass and hook it up to a great high torque mb motor. Dang I want it!!!
 

paul

Well-Known Member
Dec 23, 2007
5,548
39
48
63
Kalamazoo, MI
with the popularity of motorized bicycle getting the way it is i imagine we are going to see lots of new designs in the near future (^)
 

smokinbenrage

New Member
May 18, 2008
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I was listening to a talk radio program a few days ago and they were talking about how the gas prices are affecting people. The radio host was having people call in and tell how they are beating high gas prices. One lady called and said that her and her husband had just bought an electric scooter that got 70 miles per charge. It also went from 0-60 in about 8 seconds. She also said that it only costs her about $0.30 to charge it! The down fall is that it cost them $8000.00 for the scooter:(. I guess it is some european futuristic looking scooter. I will have to call the radio show to see if they still have the name of the bike and the web address... I forgot it:(.

Thanks,

Ben
 

deacon

minor bike philosopher
Jan 15, 2008
8,117
3
0
north carolina
My wife said she saaw a tv bit about an electric car for 7k out there. I had a hard time believing it but who knows.
 

thatsdax

Member
Feb 22, 2008
869
1
16
www.thatsdax.com
ok... Lets see... 8000 dollars and...

ok... Lets do a little math here.. 8000usd divided by 4.00 a gallon and you get 2000 gallons of gas for that 8000 bucks. If you have a car that gets around 20miles per gallon, that is about 40,000 miles !!! An average person will drive around 10,000 miles a year. Now it costs her or him only 30cents to charge it up. Average life of batteries is around 4-5 years.. So.. At the end of the 5 years, they have to buy a new set of batteries for how much? Probably a few thousand dollars.. So that gets us up to around 60,000 miles in the car now or 6 years pay off. But I am not sure... I mean.. The cost to run this scooter over 6 years is 10-12 thousand dollars.. And.. You can buy a harley for that and have gas to spare and not have lead, acid, and other things to worry about. I heard about this guy that goes 10 weeks without a bath and then brags how he is conserving water... Yikes !!! Enjoy the ride...
 

motorbiker

New Member
Mar 22, 2008
569
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Tampa Bay Florida

MyPC8MyBrain

New Member
Aug 1, 2008
30
0
0
I believe those are LifePO4. The best type of battery currently suited for Ebikes. Be careful of buying from goldenmotor. you can get good prices, but if something goes wrong you are on your own.

My 1000watt regenerative controller from goldenmotor fried on day 2 and he wont respond to my emails about the issue. Lesson learned... service is certainly a factor for anything over 50 bucks.