29er Mountain Bikes?

Easy Rider

Santa Cruz Scooter Works
Jan 15, 2008
2,144
4
38
Nor*Cal
I had some time to kill this beautiful Friday afternoon so I went into the local bike shop and saw a killer looking Mountain Bike but it looked bigger than a normal mountain bike. I took a glance at the tire size and saw it was sporting 29-inch mountain bike tires instead of the regular 26-inch tires. I'm now contemplating on making a 29er for my next bike. Does anyone have any pros and cons on using such large tires?
 

Andyinchville1

Manufacturer/Dealer
Dec 26, 2007
502
1
18
Scottsville, VA
HI EZ,

Only thing I can think of that may be a con is maybe not all shops carry 29" tires / tubes....Probably not a big issue in most cases BUT if it is your sole transportation and a tire gets trashed for whatever reason a replacement could take awhile to get (I live in a small town so no 29 ers around here.....)

Andrew
 

Andyinchville1

Manufacturer/Dealer
Dec 26, 2007
502
1
18
Scottsville, VA
I did see a few pics of 29ers in a mountain bike mag that fit your single speed description but I have seen more pics of 29ers as down hill free ride bikes.....
Which were you thinking of building?
 

lennyharp

New Member
Jul 19, 2008
429
1
0
Mesa Arizona
The gears will be taller or higher because of the larger diameter. A racer friend has a new 29er and says it works better on roads as the taller gears make it fun to ride the roads to the trails . I always did that with 26" but know what he was saying.

I used to race single speed and loved a 24 inch wheel because it was so light and strong (the smaller diameter the wheel the stronger it is against side forces.). The down side was the rough stuff got rougher. 26 was much smoother and 29 would be that much smoother again.
 

jg767

New Member
May 28, 2008
60
0
0
Lenny, you hit the nail on the head! The tire hits the bumps at an easier angle the big
ger it is, also you have more rubber contacting the road, giving you better suspension. It also puts you and the motor closer to the center of gravity, giving the ride even more stability. I just ordered a motobecane fantom from bikesdirect, I'm putting a morini 9.4 in the frame. It seems like a good way to improve comfort and handling without going into a full suspension setup. I could'nt find any decent full suspension with a diamond frame to use the morini. If you're tall like me, all the more reason to consider a29er. The downside is that there are more limited parts available, but interest seems to be growing.I will post my results when I'm finished this build.
 

wildemere

New Member
Feb 12, 2008
269
0
0
Newcastle
The "29er" size is the same as 700C and closer to 27" in reality.

There are plenty of tyre choices for 700c available

My latest build is on a 700c Hybrid/City bike and it rides better than my 26".

I'm about to fit some 38mm or 42mm slicks still deciding which size.
 

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theycallmebob

New Member
Dec 13, 2008
100
0
0
Gainesville, FL
I had a 29er redline monocog. Excellent bike. Really fun on the trails. The benefit of the larger wheel has been stated, smoother ride over the bumpy stuff. Theres plenty of online retailers who sell 29er parts, but you pay a premium.

I can highly recommend the redline monocog, a ch80 would fit in the frame easily. Mine had no suspension.
 

bigben77

New Member
Jul 2, 2008
66
0
0
43
Edmonds, WA
My LBS is trying to talk me into a Redline monocoq 29er as well. I like the ride and feel of the bike, it has dual purpose qualities I loof for, such as disc break wheels with disc tabs on the frame and fork. BUT it also comes equiped with V breaks with compatable wheels!!

My only negative thoughts were, will the H/T engines fit?
what kind of parts are available for replacement or upgrade?

I live in a large city with MANY bike shops available. so I think parts should not be too much of an issue.
So that just leaves fitment questions...

LBS will give me a good deal if I buy it. I think I might go for it.

.wee.
 

mabman

New Member
Oct 4, 2008
258
0
0
In the wind
I happened to be involved with the 29" wheel from the beginning. 700c wheels have been around since the late 1800's but until Mark Slate at Wilderness Trail Bikes (WTB) made the 52/47 (2.1) Nanoraptor in the spring of 1999 10 years ago the 29" designation which is the overall diameter of the wheel with a Nano mounted, did not exist. This is the first bike that ever had the tires mounted on it in the spring of 99' in CB, CO.
#129.jpg
The biggest benefit is as mentioned, the ability to roll through and over stuff with just that much more ability than 26" which has that much more ability than 24" etc. and it does so at lower psi due to the higher volume of air in the tire. The highest pressure that I have run in the last 10 years is 30. I have had fewer flats in that time than you can count on one hand whereas before I had a flat more often than not running 40+ in 26" wheels.

The argument that there are not enough parts available and that the wheels are weaker is bunk. Even in 99' we had suspension front and rear as evidenced here, my first 29"er, 2344521oak.jpg I have a wheelset that has probably more than 3k on it using rim brakes and I have had to true the rear maybe once a little bit after original tensioning and it has seen mostly singletrack in the Rocky Mtns. type of use. YMMV of course, but I doubt it.

What can 29" wheels do for the MB world? I am not a big proponent of the use of MB's offroad, but roads themselves can be pretty darn rough if you factor in all the chuck holes, speed bumps, cracks, dirt etc.. What we find using a bike like this P1010779.JPG is that it reacts much better to these obstructions at speed than a 26" wheel can. We are going to continue going down this path and as time goes on we will have more data to support this.

One of the arguments about the larger wheel size is that it does not suit smaller riders. In the pedal bike world I would maybe agree with riders 5' or less. I have ridden with 5' 1" women riders that just plain rip on theirs. But the extra rotational weight makes it a bit harder for them to spool up, but once they do they roll more efficiently. With a motor this melts away and there is no reason to not use 29" wheels for MB's and MAB's other than the fact that they are not socially acceptable in this genre any more so than they were accepted in the Mtn. Bike world back in 99'. Things are slow to change in the bike industry, but the early adopters get the biggest benefit from being receptive to new ideas. As long as the idea is sound anyway.

Next on the list is 36" wheels!
Black_Sheep_36er.jpg

Or big fat wheels?
surly-pugsley1.jpg



In the meantime ride what you have and be careful out there!
 
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