Wanted: Diagnosis of clutch problem (video provided)

PlanItEarth

New Member
May 20, 2013
5
0
0
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Hello fine reader,

I'm hoping for a diagnosis of my bikes potential problem(s) and a few sentences of guidance on what thread(s) to read, etc next to get back my two-stroke land-wings :)

Here's the link to a cloud folder of a couple hd videos/pictures of the chain stuck in the clutch. (fyi I have a limited technical vocabulary and did not build my own bike)

https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=0B4VOSkro9VkDSjdaQ1JWdnAxYmc&usp=sharing

Best,
Alec
 

Tristan2021

New Member
Dec 2, 2013
5
0
0
Iowa
Well first if you want your chain to last for longer than a month buy a thing called chain wax and coat that sucker up and see those 3 flathead screws take them out and than you can get the chain unstuck from their
 

GearNut

Active Member
Aug 19, 2009
5,104
7
38
San Diego, Kaliforgnia
From what I have seen in your video, there is nothing wrong with the clutch at all.
The chain looks horribly neglected, terribly rusted and should be replaced. You might be able to save it by soaking it in diesel fuel for a day or two but definitely plan on replacing it.

The chain has bound up on the engine drive sprocket. This is quite common by both tight clearances under the sprocket cover as well as running a chain with too much free play. Also a heavily rusted chain cannot freely wrap around the sprockets and this too will cause a jamb.
The chain should be well lubricated with a quality, chain specific chain lube, be rust free and have 1/2 inch up and down slack measured half way between the sprockets.
http://motorbicycling.com/showthread.php?t=11070
http://motorbicycling.com/showthread.php?t=41195
http://motorbicycling.com/showthread.php?t=15960
 

Dan

Staff
Staff member
May 25, 2008
12,775
106
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Moosylvania
Howdy Alec. Welcome to the forum.

I was going to suggest bacon grease for the chain but think it is to far gone, as GN said. Honestly, the best chain lube I have ever found. Soaks in great and makes em look new.

Just a thought, but after removing the chain, I would use an old screw driver (the most abused of all tools, lol) to see if you can turn the drive sprocket.

If it is really seized up, might not be worth continuing. But is more likely to be just fine.

Never worry about "technical vocabulary" Some really great folks here and is all friends and friendly. "Whatayacallit", "thingamcabob" and "the thing that..." are all valid titles for components.

But do try to remember there are 3 sqoushes in a smidge. Might be the other way around. I forget.
 

Dan

Staff
Staff member
May 25, 2008
12,775
106
48
55
Moosylvania
Very cool!

Really funny thing about these crazy things is they are great teachers. They really are. Physics and math alone. Turning wrenches really is not that hard and there is just some thing about having grease under your finger nails and a bloody knuckle that makes it seem like a well spent day.

Then you get to ride your work. Really is a functional art sort of feeling.

And it is cheaper then golf. (lol, golfers get really POed when I say that)

Just some things you might like to consider. Bike fenders will try to kill you. I see your bike has none but worth mentioning. Wear a helmet even on short test rides. A bicycle helmet will save your life but a motorcycle helmet will do that and help cars know your going faster then a bike.

The bicycle it self must be in good working order. Good brakes front and rear and nothing loose.

I been playing with these things for yrs and just learned the importance of wearing a vest like road workers.

That sounded all preachy but man, big time important.

I'm sure I missed some thing but some one will jump in and let us know.
 

2door

Moderator
Staff member
Sep 15, 2008
16,325
114
63
Littleton, Colorado
All good advice already given but I'll make a suggestion. Get that rubber out of the engine mounts. You want metal to metal where the engine mounts to the frame. No rubber!

I wouldn't try to save that chain but I understand if you're on a tight budget. If you do replace it you can find #41 chain at Ace Hardware and most industrial suppliers like Grainger. Some farm supply outlets will also carry roller chain. You'll need a master link too.

With that said, I'm not 100% sure the chain is bound on the drive sprocket. You really can't see it from the video. You'll need to remove the clutch actuator cover and look. If the chain is bunched up in front of the sprocket then that is the problem. If it is laying flush in the sprocket teeth then it's possible you do have a clutch problem if you can't rotate the rear wheel with the clutch lever (on handlebar) squeezed.
Get back to us and let us know what you find.
Oh, and welcome to the forum.

Good luck.

Tom
 

PlanItEarth

New Member
May 20, 2013
5
0
0
Ann Arbor, Michigan
If it is laying flush in the sprocket teeth then it's possible you do have a clutch problem if you can't rotate the rear wheel with the clutch lever (on handlebar) squeezed.
Just opened it up yesterday and--seeing the chain links correctly aligned on the sprocket teeth--realized it was in fact a clutch problem (though there was some sort of insect egg sac between two of the sprocket teeth inside)!

No amount of levering I could apply from my chode screwdriver was going to unstick the sprocket. I was defeated.

...or so I thought. Reading 2door's post, I decided to put the chain back on the back wheel's sprocket, flip the bike upside down, and depress the "clutch lever" (although since the 'actuator cover' was off, and the clutch lever was no longer functional, I just depressed the pressed in the little cylindrical pin the lever would normally push (is it called an actuator pin?)

Anyway, I realized I had been trying to unstick it before without depressing this pin.
Maybe this messed up the sprocket and all hope WAS lost...

NO! angrily jerking the wheel like a frustrated sex addict with speed-induced-orgasmic-disorder DID eventually made that sprocket pop!
A celebratory beer was had

--

Now I must:
1. see if i can start the engine
2. possibly replace spark plug
3. remove chain
4. install new chain
5. align chain properly so it doesn't get stuck in sprocket
 
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2door

Moderator
Staff member
Sep 15, 2008
16,325
114
63
Littleton, Colorado
I'm not sure how you depressed the "pin" which is called the 'bucking bar' by hand but what you are describing is a common problem with new engines. The clutch friction pads get stuck and will not release without a little persuasion. Sometimes all it takes is a sharp rap with a soft head hammer on the bucking bar or rolling the bike with the chain installed and the clutch engaged to break them loose.

Whatever, we hope this solved your chain problems.
Let us know if you need more help.

Tom
 

GearNut

Active Member
Aug 19, 2009
5,104
7
38
San Diego, Kaliforgnia
If you tried to release the clutch by pushing on the bucking bar by hand, without the use of the sprocket/ release cover installed and utilizing the leverage provided by the release mechanism, and you were successful in pushing the bucking bar in far enough to actually release the clutch plate, you are Hercules, Superman and the Incredible Hulk all in one.
The clutch spring has more that 50 lbs of pressure strength holding the clutch tightly engaged. You need to put more pressure than that against that small little bucking bar to release the clutch, and you did this bare handed?.
If you got the sprocket to "pop" and free spin during your chosen method to get the clutch un-stuck, I am concerned that you sheared the woodruff key that helps lock the sprocket to the output shaft.

As 2door said, please let us know how that worked out for you and let us know if you need more help.