Tips on Starting your Shift-Kit equiped bike

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by MrLarkins, Jul 10, 2009.

  1. MrLarkins

    MrLarkins HS Math Teacher

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    ok, PLEASE give all the tips on starting this shift-kit equipped beast...its like pedaling a tank!
     
  2. Clotho

    Clotho Member

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    Choke on if the engine is cold. Prime it if it is cold. Bike in lowest gear. Point bike downhill. Right pedal at the top of the arc (I'm right handed). Clutch out. Stand up on the pedal gently and it should start.
     
  3. MrLarkins

    MrLarkins HS Math Teacher

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    like a kick start almost, right?
     
  4. Ghost0

    Ghost0 New Member

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    Not like a kick start, as Clotho said get the pedal of your strong leg just past the top of the crank arc. Apply your weight to it and it should start to turn over. Once it starts to turn over just keep pedaling. It also helps to get the bike moving at a decent pace so you are just turning the engine over and trying to propel the bike at the same time.
     
  5. lordoflightaz

    lordoflightaz New Member

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    Like Ghost sez, except if I don't get it to pop I rewind back up and step down again, that way I don't have to pull in the clutch to get it back to just past the top of the arc. Latest build I think my clutch might be a little loose so I can pedal it through but will be tightening that up. I do it on the weak side leg, right, makes it easier to give it some gas.
     
  6. joewlms3

    joewlms3 New Member

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    if the rear wheel didnt have a freewheel would it be able to then bump start?
     
  7. Creative Engineering

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    MrLarkins,

    It's the change that is hard to get used to. We form habits that are hard to break. Once you get out of the mind-set of "pedal-stop pedaling-release clutch-Go"; it's not so bad.

    Brett Mavriks' jack-shaft set-up was the same way...it was VERY awkward at first. As suggested, pedal up to 5-7MPH before releasing the clutch, (the momentum will help), and then continue to pedal hard against the compression of the engine until it starts.

    Get the engine fine tuned, and learn exactly what it takes to execute an easy start as Clotho pointed out.

    Before long it will be second nature.

    Jim
     
  8. Creative Engineering

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    YES...and for the remainder of the ride you will be aboard a traveling egg, I mean leg, beater.

    Jim
     
  9. Clotho

    Clotho Member

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    Alas no, The freewheel is on the pedal crank so same difference. The motor won't turn over unless you are turning it over. You are already pedaling downhill right? :) Giver a little gas and she goes! Become one with the machine.. No need to kick the machine... Just make it turn over a few times.
     
  10. MrLarkins

    MrLarkins HS Math Teacher

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    good suggestions guys, any more?
     
  11. Rockenstein

    Rockenstein New Member

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    If you weld or somehow lock up your rear freewheel you'll be able to start\ride as normal...I'd spring the $$ for SBP's serviceable HD front freewheel though if you lock up the rear one. Also with a locked rear freewheel you'll be able to down\up shift while coasting :)
     
    #11 Rockenstein, Jul 11, 2009
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2009
  12. Ghost0

    Ghost0 New Member

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    Not exactly true if you use a derailleur. Compression, or bump starting puts the tension on the chain in reverse of how it is typically driven. With a rear derailleur it would unwind the rear derailleur causing the chain to go slack and probably fall off. It could be done this way with a Nuvinci without a rear freewheel. I don't think it would work with a normal internal hub shifter, I don't think they like running backwards.
     
  13. Junster

    Junster New Member

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    Finished my shifter kit conversion today. It is going to take some getting use to. For me not only starting but letting off the throttle and not feeling the motor anymore was a strange sensation. I really like not having the extra chain back there. My bike was clocked at 34 with the 44 tooth, motor screaming. I have to figure out how to put my gps on the bars so I know for sure but I had to be going well over 40 and it had more. I agree the Creative, this is going to take some adjusting.

    Just wanted to add, shifting going down the road.. waay cool.
     
  14. Pablo

    Pablo Master Bike Builder & Forum Sponsor

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    Not true. But I must assume you are just kidding. We have a front freewheel.
     

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