Some help with centrifugal clutch install

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by geoldr, Oct 11, 2011.

  1. vincent713

    vincent713 New Member

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    Geo, are you able to put on the CC cover?
     
  2. Pucksterpete

    Pucksterpete New Member

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    After taking it a part I found the rubbing noise, like you said the "Housing", I see that at idle and when the housing is coming to a stop it is rubbing on one of the pads or whatever they are called that move outward in the housing. I suppose with wear it will smooth itself out.

    Pete
     
  3. vincent713

    vincent713 New Member

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    Yes, the quality control of whoever makes these things are pretty much non existence. In time it does seem to be smoother. I have to say I'm enjoying the automatic clutch, I don't have to worry about pulling the lever to disengage the clutch. This makes it a more carefree and enjoyable ride. .shft.
     
  4. rohmell

    rohmell Active Member

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    On some CCs that I have bought, the weight/friction assy. (the part with the spring holding it all together) was easily removed from the rest of the clutch, on some, it just fell off, but on others it held together with a death grip.

    I file the rough edges in the egg-shaped hole and the mating surfaces on the bearing shaft so that the the weight/friction assy. is easy to remove once the center screw is removed. This allows easy access to the sprag and bearing surfaces for easy cleaning and lubrication, and also allows you to remove the large replacement cover easily so that you can service the manual clutch.

    Doing this allows the bearing shaft with the taper fit to always remain on the crankshaft, so you don't have to keep taking it off and putting it on once it is set to the correct depth so that everything clears the replacement small cover.
     
  5. Pucksterpete

    Pucksterpete New Member

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    Hey Rohmell how often do you service the CC?

    Pete
     
  6. rohmell

    rohmell Active Member

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    I don't have a set interval, but I do like working on my MBs, so every so often I will open it up and take a look, and relube if I feel like it.

    While at a standstill, engage and disengage the manual clutch lever. If idle stays the same, all is good. If idle drops when the clutch is engaged, it means the CC bearing is adding friction, and it is time for a lube.
     
  7. Pucksterpete

    Pucksterpete New Member

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    I understand what your talking about, but how do you go about disassembling the clutch so that the gear stays on the shaft? What are the steps to take? From what I can see with the cc on I do see grease on the springs. Thanx for the help Rohmell. Its a learning in progress.

    Pete
     
  8. rohmell

    rohmell Active Member

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    The gear is spot welded to the drum, when you slide the drum off, the gear comes with it.
     
  9. geoldr

    geoldr New Member

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    No, still not able too. I kept grinding the inside of the CC, but it still doesn't fit. I am worried about grinding it even more, it seems loser than it used to be. I will probably just leave it as is and make a gasket or something to make the cover fit on. But in the meantime, with these super wide cranks, legs are very far away from the spinning CC

    How did you guys grind the inside of the CC? dremel tool? With what bit, and how long did it take?
     
    #129 geoldr, Nov 15, 2011
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2011
  10. rohmell

    rohmell Active Member

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    Weight/friction assy, separated from the drum:
    [​IMG]

    This part can stay on the crankshaft, no need to remove:
    [​IMG]
     
  11. rohmell

    rohmell Active Member

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    I used a small grinding stone on the Dremel.
    For me, takes a long time because I grind, then install to test fit, remove, grind, install to test fit, etc.

    ...But the results are well worth it, as all you CC guys have found out.
     
  12. geoldr

    geoldr New Member

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    Grinding stone, ok that is what I am using. And you are just putting it inside of the CC that goes onto the crankshaft and grinding that part down right? I am just trying to see maybe I am doing something wrong.

    I am pushing the grinding stone as far as it will and and grinding that part. Maybe thats not right either
     
    #132 geoldr, Nov 15, 2011
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2011
  13. vincent713

    vincent713 New Member

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    I use the diamond bit and just softly grind the inside of the CC hole. It fits perfect after the 1st try.
     
  14. Pucksterpete

    Pucksterpete New Member

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    Thank you for the pictures, after removing the center bolt, what is the best way to remove the assembly off the sleeve that is now forced on the crankshaft? Is it just a matter trying to wiggle it off?

    Pete
     
  15. rohmell

    rohmell Active Member

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    Grab the drum and gently rock back and forth, and it should come off, unless you have one of those with the death grip on it.

    When you finally get it off, you file a little bit in the egg-shaped hole, then you can test fit the weight/friction assy. onto the sleeve, no need to use the drum for test fitting.

    With some of my CC kits, out of the box, you could tilt the bike to the side and the weight/friction assy. would practically fall off into your waiting hand, but of course, due to tolerances and quality control, the fit amongst the parts between various kits will vary greatly from loose to super tight.

    When reinstalling the drum, use a turning motion so that the sprag roller bearings find their way into position on the sleeve, and keep your finger on the sprag roller bearing keeper. If you just shove it on, you will see the sprag roller bearing keeper start to lift up, and the bearings might fall out of position, but hopefully the thick Chinese grease will hold them in place.

    Once you do it a few times, taking it off and putting it on, you will become more and more comfortable with servicing your CC.

    Sometimes things are hard to explain using words, just go ahead and take a look at it, everything should become clear.
     
    #135 rohmell, Nov 16, 2011
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2011
  16. Pucksterpete

    Pucksterpete New Member

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    Cool, thanx, your words and description are fine, I have a better understanding of it all now, Lets go see.

    Pete
     

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