Santa on a bike in downtown Fujisawa

Zingpast

New Member
Dec 25, 2007
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Japan

The NiMH battery lasts all day and is considerably cheaper than the Lithium battery

In the shadow of the (Shinto) Crow Woods shrine

Panasonic makes it and it cost about $600. Many battery bikes cost much more, but this one is very satisfactory except for one thing: Aluminum spokes are not good for supporting weight. My bike has been shipped to Osaka to replace the spokes for the second time in less than two years. I wish they would replace with stainless steel, but they probably won't.
 
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Zingpast

New Member
Dec 25, 2007
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Hiromi on her Jaguar. Many car manufacturers make bicycles for Japan, including Jaguar, Chevrolet, Cadillac, Renault, Hummer, Jeep, etc.
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paul

Well-Known Member
Dec 23, 2007
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that is awesome zingpast and thank you for shareing. are motorized bikes pretty comon in japan? here in michigan i have never seen any except mine. i have an electric one and gas powered one
 

Zingpast

New Member
Dec 25, 2007
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Battery Bikes are common in Japan

The bicycle is probably the most common form of transportation in Japan. There are so many bicycles that finding a parking place for a bike can be a real problem. In some cases you may have to pay a fee to park a bike or walk a considerable distance after parking your bike.
Regular bikes are pretty cheap and a good one can be had for about $100.00 US. Battery bikes run about $600.00 and up. They are available in MANY places.
I chose the National Panasonic bike, because it looked sturdy and was not so expensive. I opted for the NiMH battery against advice that Lithium was the "only way to go". I have been quite satisfied with the NiMH battery, although you must completely discharge it before you can recharge. That is not a problem if you plan ahead.
It is so much fun to ride...not like a motorcycle, because you must still pedal. The battery "boosts" the energy provided by pedaling. You can climb a pretty steep hilll while sitting down and without beaking a sweat. You can go faster and further than an ordinary bike. There is still exercise value in it, just not as tiring.
Japan is a wonderful place for bikes, because of the traffic laws favoring bikers and ample room for bikes. Downtown you have to manouver through a sea of people, but you learn to do that pretty gracefully and people are pretty good about moving over especially if you sound a warning bell or horn.
The worst thing about the bike is that they tried to save money by using aluminum spokes. Most Japanese people are small and the bikes are built for them, not for us McDonaldized Americans. I wish I could get stainless steel spokes. The aluminum ones have broken twice and instead of simply replacing them, they send the whole bicycle to Osaka! It takes at least a month to get it repaired and back into my hands. Cost of repair? The first time was free, under warranty, but I don't know the final cost of this current repair...I won't get the bike back until mid-January. Phooey!
 
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Harold

New Member
Dec 25, 2007
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What a wonderful way to travel... I like the idea of still having to pedal... I have a tendency to get lazy and fat, but worn out trying to bicycle to far.
 

Zingpast

New Member
Dec 25, 2007
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Japan
More Pictures from Japan

Chopper

Pastor Vic Porter with John and Hiromi

Pastor Vic at McDonald's in Fujisawa, Japan

Pastor Vic is a bike rider!
 
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Pablo

Master Bike Builder & Forum Sponsor
Dec 28, 2007
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www.sickbikeparts.com
I LOVE the pictures!! Someday I'll get to Japan. I spent five years traveling in and out of China, but never set foot in Japan.

Aluminum spokes....yikes...

I don't see a motor on Santa's bike:confused: