Pushme/pullyou 4 junkyard contest

Dan

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May 25, 2008
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Moosylvania
Yesterday I found an old go cart that will be cut in half to be the foundation of a pusher trailer (proailer?)((Think I found product name!)) It will be covered by a insulated cowling to muffle engine noise and also to house the alternator, 12 volt battery and of course the car stereo. The cool part is it will be easily detachable from the bike via a regular ball type hitch. this will allow it to to twist, turn, push and pull. The throttle, lighting and "Proailer" brake cables will be easily disconnected via 2 plates where the ends will be mounted on the hitch part of the ball and hitch
with quick connectors.

On top of engine box, I am going to put one of those aluminum attic, spinning exhaust things. Empire Ventilation Equipment - Ventilators, Bases, Louvers, and Other Ventilation Products Not just for the "What is that thing?" effect, it really will help with cooling as I will be restricting airflow. That's my story and I am sticking to it.

What are the drawbacks to pusher motors? Must be some thing or we would see more I would think.
As always, I look forward to your input.

Pics soon to follow.
 

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stude13

New Member
May 28, 2008
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north bend wa.
hi dan; i think you will have trouble if you hook it up with a swivel or ball. the power unit needs to be a solid hitch, usually to rear frame or seat post. the reason is that a swivel will cause a jack knife and push your bike on its side. there are pics of seat post in search. another idea is to use an old mini bike with briggs and straton, remove front wheel and bars, use a bent pipe to seat post. ride safe. mitch
 

Dan

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May 25, 2008
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Moosylvania
LOL! seems to be a Chinese engine. I am in need of a small wire for the choke and an air filter. Will just jury rig some thing. Any advice or thoughts are welcome!! Engine is a lil funky. has a lever near the power out-drive that seems not to do any thing. Will get pics tomorrow. Today was a wash as I was busy flunking an exam for the FD. Engine is about 6 HP, I think. maybe 8. Way more power then I want or need but go cart was $150. It sounds awesome the few seconds it runs. It dies right off no matter what I do. Gas and choke. But I am sure I will figure it out, eventually.

The carb has 2 studs holding it on. They are 1.75 inches apart and the round air cleaner secures to them as well. I have to measure, but think that's the same as a China-girl motor?

A friend has offered to donate an alternator, but wan"ts it back when I die during the shake down cruise of the pushme/pullyou. snork.

"...a swivel will cause a jack knife and push your bike on its side." Thanks Stude! made me rethink the position of the hitch. I was going to put it above the rear wheel at a 45 degree angle. I am still going to try the ball and hitch coupling, but low and inside arc of the rear tire. Whats the worst that can happen? hehe.

I really want to do it differently then what has been tried b4. Must be a reason every one mounts to the seat post. Guess I am gonna find out.

Oh, the pic of the lil pilot guy at top of page, it is an antenna topper from wally world and coolballs.com. 2 bucks at wally world, 4 pluss shipping online. I found some more of them and want to donate to the prise package. They have an "Invader Zim" too online. ^5
 

Dan

Staff
May 25, 2008
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Moosylvania
Great vid Jason. The engine didn't sound like it had any trouble at all. That's cool.

Found out today I am the proud owner of a 3.5 HP Honda G150 (G150-144 CM3) after cleaning away some grime. 144cc. Way too big but will be covered and I ride slow when ever possible. Still not sure what the extra lever is for. It is the silver rod looking thing above the oil fill cap and next to the clutch. Must have some thing to do with the gear reduction. Looking for parts for the carb, but seems it is a really old engine. Air cleaner is gone and all the connections are Micky Moused. But man it sounds good. Well, for a few seconds then EERRrrrrr... silence.
 

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Jemma Hawtrey

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Dec 29, 2007
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Essex, UK
It could be the remains of an idle regulator. Alot of the old stationary engines had them.

The idea was that, for example, a Lister D engine would chug along at 600-1000 or so rpm for ever once you got the thing to start. If you had a load on the flywheel like a milling machine or something which needed a fair amount of torque - if there was a sudden need for power the engine revs would drop and if the load was high enough it would stall the engine out.

On the lister there is a large bowl type thing on the side of the motor which I think housed a diapragm - this had a linkage that ran to a swivel - then across the motor under the carb - to another swivel - and to the carburettor swivel linkage itself (the carb is an amal). The idea was that when the widget inside the bowl detected that the engine was slowing off or had come under load it would automatically adjust the throttle position to maintain the set rpms. The one I had and is still at my parents place is a rare one as it is the oldest known with a chain drive magneto assm.

Given the position of your errant bit of engine - it being in line with the carb on the same plane and same side of the motor this might be what it is. if that is the case and you get the engine running - revving the motor should mean this 'lever' moves as it would when the thing was connected to the carb throttle butterfly...

just a thought

Jemma xx
 

Dan

Staff
May 25, 2008
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Moosylvania
Jemma, Neko yeppers! you are absolutely right. Thankx. Was driving me mad trying to figure it out. A bud of mine and truly gifted wrench-er took one look and said exactly what you said. Now just have to rig it back in. Gonna do the trial and error thing.

Found a universal radio seat today. going to experiment with a hitch that just goes up and down, but does not twist. All who told me not to do the ball and hitch thing were right. (gotta watch me every minute)

Lord this is fun.
:ride:
 

Jemma Hawtrey

New Member
Dec 29, 2007
288
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Essex, UK
Jemma, Neko yeppers! you are absolutely right. Thankx. Was driving me mad trying to figure it out. A bud of mine and truly gifted wrench-er took one look and said exactly what you said. Now just have to rig it back in. Gonna do the trial and error thing.

Found a universal radio seat today. going to experiment with a hitch that just goes up and down, but does not twist. All who told me not to do the ball and hitch thing were right. (gotta watch me every minute)

Lord this is fun.
:ride:
You might want to hold off when it comes to reconnecting an idle regulator for the following reason. A lister could theoretically run up to 2500rpm (even with the naff splash lubrication) but the regulator was there to make sure a piston the size of your fist didnt suddenly punch its way out and meet with someones body part (gods know nothing on a farm in them days was safe, not even many of the farmers would pass modern health and safety). Its likely that the regulator gubbins will not allow the engine to rev to its full potential when its all connected up. Probably not what you want in a bike application - unless of course you wire it up indepandantly as some sort of cruise control regulator... now theres a thought lol

I'll tell you a story from my past. When I first got a Humber Sceptre I was confuzzled by the lever on the right hand side of the steering column. All it did with the ignition on was make a solenoid go click and light up a little indicator and I could see no other function for it at all...
First time I took the car out on the road - I was happily trundling (for trundling read 55mph down a backroad) along and remembered that switch. Pushed the switch down - and promptly found 6th gear - and thats how Jemma learned about overdrive...
Scant seconds later she learned why you always dip the clutch when disengaging overdrive too.... headbutting the steering wheel hurts rotfl

Basically once you have seen something, you know what it is - until you have its often a mystery, specially since alot of the old tech used very simple mechanical feedback systems where these days we'd use electronics...

Remind me to tell you the story about how I left the lights on one time - spent over an hour trying to push start the humber on my own... (120lbs versus just over a ton) and then remembered about the starting handle in the boot.....

Jemma xx