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OzzyU812

Member
May 15, 2008
258
0
16
"the bog" NH
There's a message o the top of this web page that says, "Hello OzzyU812 it appears that you have not posted on our forums in several weeks, why not take a few moments to ask a question, help provide a solution or just engage in a conversation with another member in any one of our forums?" So here it goes. I have a electric motor that has a sprocket designed for 1/8" chains. I want to run the chain to my front sprocket which designed for 3/32' chains. I plan on riding it 20 mi. a day. Do you guys think this will be a problem? Should I shop for a front sprocket that uses a 1/8" chain?
 

eDJ

Member
Jul 8, 2008
530
0
16
Wayne National Forest
Say OzzyUB12,

Sparky just joined the forum from the UK and he's looking at an electric project.
I've got one on the drawing board now.

Why don't you offer some more details about your motor, the company who produced it, if it was a kit or part of a kit etc such that you're trying to adapt a kit, sprockets & chain drive, or doing a semi do it yourself bike ?

Thanks

eDJ
 

OzzyU812

Member
May 15, 2008
258
0
16
"the bog" NH
Say OzzyUB12,

Sparky just joined the forum from the UK and he's looking at an electric project.
I've got one on the drawing board now.

Why don't you offer some more details about your motor, the company who produced it, if it was a kit or part of a kit etc such that you're trying to adapt a kit, sprockets & chain drive, or doing a semi do it yourself bike ?

Thanks

eDJ
Its an E-Zip Walmart.com: E-Zip 2008 Mountain Trailz Hybrid Electric Bike: Bikes, Scooters & Skates
To try to make a long story short. I was planning to relocate the motor. See " Currie Pedal Assist" pic (sorry about quality). I got a 2nd motor free from Currie. So I'm goin to keep one in the stock location and the 2nd like the pic. I'm using DPDT switch (Radio Shack part# 275-1533) to toggle from one motor to the other. I'm still early in development. I have most of the parts I need and I've swapped the single front sprocket for a 3 sprocket off of my mongoose. This sprocket will be temporary, if it works I'll get a freewheel crank from Cyclone Electric bicycle DIY kits kit NuVinci Electric bicycle DIY kits kit NuVinci Electric bicycle DIY kits kit NuVinci Electric bicycle DIY kits kit NuVinci Electric bicycle DIY kits kit NuVinci Electric bicycle DIY kits kit NuVinci Electric bicycle DIY k. I may even take the leap of getting Ghost's jackshaft kit.

I may know Sparky from the forum which must not be named :crash: LOL

Does anyone know the answer to my original question?
 

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Ilikeabikea

Moderator
Staff member
Jan 27, 2008
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Ptown, Texas
If you change the front sprocket won't you then have to change the chain and rear sprocket also? I bet a machine shop could put you a 5/16 hole in a sprocket..................
 

OzzyU812

Member
May 15, 2008
258
0
16
"the bog" NH
If you change the front sprocket won't you then have to change the chain and rear sprocket also? I bet a machine shop could put you a 5/16 hole in a sprocket..................
The reason I was asking is to see if I needed to go to a machine shop to have them mill 1/32 off of the motor sprocket. I guess the best thing to do right now is just to go for it with my fingers crossed.
We just put an offer on a house, so I'm under a little time crunch. :eek:
 

eDJ

Member
Jul 8, 2008
530
0
16
Wayne National Forest
Just a thought here, If you had a flat, solid surface that you could attach a large piece of sanding paper to, then it would follow that you could lay the sprocket flat on sand paper surface and move the piece in a figure 8 to lap 1/32
off it's surface. If you used wet sand paper, like 320 that had been wet down
to use your finger tips and evenly move the piece around until the desired thickness was achieved.

This is just old time bench crafters techniques. It's cheaper than setting up a machine in a machine shop to remove such a thin amount of metal. A combination disc & belt sander could do the trick too.
 

Jstude

New Member
Jul 3, 2008
28
0
0
South Carolina
as long as the pitch is the same, i don't see why you couldn't use a chain for the largest sprocket. if the sprockets are properly aligned and track true, what's the problem with a little lateral clearence between the smaller sprocket teeth and the chain links?
 

OzzyU812

Member
May 15, 2008
258
0
16
"the bog" NH
as long as the pitch is the same, i don't see why you couldn't use a chain for the largest sprocket. if the sprockets are properly aligned and track true, what's the problem with a little lateral clearence between the smaller sprocket teeth and the chain links?
Thanks Jstude. the larger chain looks like it seats properly.
If anyone has done something similar and had problems please post.
 

olmon

New Member
Aug 13, 2008
2
0
0
I modified a single speed trike by putting a triple crank sprocket set, derailler and tensioner on it. I couldn't use the single speed chain becuse it was too wide so I ground the rear sprocket to the thickness for the multi-speed chain. It has been over a year now and the customer I did it for hasn't had any problems.
 

OzzyU812

Member
May 15, 2008
258
0
16
"the bog" NH
Thanks Olman. the chain is on 1/32 wider. I'm gonna run it. If I have any trouble I will post.
When you say you you ground it, did you set up a mill for precision? Belt sander? Bench grinder? Sand paper flat on a table?
 

olmon

New Member
Aug 13, 2008
2
0
0
LOL - - None of the above. I put a 4inch 50grit grinding disc on my hand-held air grinder and ground it down. with human power, nothing is going fast enough to be overly worried about precision. It took about 5 minutes.