Livefastmotors rear sprocket install instructions question.

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by Courtney Hook, Aug 31, 2008.

  1. Courtney Hook

    Courtney Hook New Member

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    OK, I've been building my 80cc kit and installed my rear sprocket like the instructions from livefastmotors, showing the two rubber rings on the INSIDE of the spokes, with the 44 tooth sprocket sitting directly down on the spokes. This is how the instructions show, but it makes more sense to me to have one rubber ring on the inside of the hub, one outside THEN the sprocket. This would protect the spokes.
    My question is, I've already assembled the rear sprocket with the two rubbers inside and used locktite. Has anyone had trouble with the sprocket wearing down the spokes when assembled the way livefastmotors says to do it? I don't REALLY want to take it all apart again.
     
  2. TwoWalks

    TwoWalks New Member

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    Courtney, I do not have the answer to your question but... I am in the process of building my first MB and seen those directions, then I found install instructions that said to not cut one washer and place it outside the spokes then the sprocket. The do not cut made more sense to me as this sandwiches the spokes and holds them firm. I look forward to seeing the replies.
     
  3. deacon

    deacon minor bike philosopher

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    The rubber rings go one inside and one outside of the spokes... Good luck
     
  4. Courtney Hook

    Courtney Hook New Member

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    I was afraid I was going to get that answer. "sigh", now to disassemble the rear wheel again. :-(
     
  5. Dave31

    Dave31 Moderator
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    Yes cut one rubber....goes Sprocket/rubber/spokes/rubber. You do not want metal against metal. I do know livefast says for multi-speed mount sprocket/spokes/rubber/rubber....but I do not know anyone how does it that way.

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  6. Courtney Hook

    Courtney Hook New Member

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    OK, redid it. Took about an hour and a half to dismount, disassemble, cleanup locktite, then reassemble. But at least I know it's now a job done properly. Did anyone torque theirs?
     
  7. Bikeguy Joe

    Bikeguy Joe Godfather of Motorized Bicycles

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    Yes, I "cranked 'em down".
     
  8. mralaska

    mralaska New Member

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    I initially mounted mine 'properly' but the sprocket was visibly mis-aligned and occasionally throwing the chain. I dissembled it then remounted it with both spacers inside the spokes which moved the sprocket in the width of one rubber for better alignment and no more thrown chain.

    Although most installation instructions concur with sandwiching the spokes, I have seen at least on other that maintains that only one rubber is needed on the inside of the spokes and the outer one can be omitted entirely. I personally feel that every application has its own tweaks. Pulling the sprocket directly against the spokes is not something that makes me feel all warm and fuzzy but the mounting setup itself has its appeal more in its effective simplicity than any engineering marvel of strength and security.
     
  9. Spunout

    Spunout MB Builder Extraordinaire

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    the thing with mounting the sprocket against the spokes, with no rubber spacer is this: you're bringing the chain that much closer to your tire. you can chew a cruiser-type balloon tire up with a quickness. to the point of rubbing a hole thru to the tube and PSSSSSSS!!!! flat tire.
     
  10. mralaska

    mralaska New Member

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    That is a good point and certainly something to keep an eye on that I just noticed today. When I reassembled it this last time I did not bother remounting the chain guard. After a ten mile cruise I stopped to talk to someone who wanted to check out the bike and noticed some chewed up spots on the rear tire. I am not sure if they were there before or not, but I need to put the guard back on and mark the damaged areas. If more spots show up I will need to see if I can modify the guard to protect the tire better or perhaps even revisit the sprock alignment issue for alternative approaches with the sprocket mounted away from the spokes. I hate to mess with the alignment if I can help it, though, because the chain rolls so nicely over the sprocket now with never a jump or chatter.
     
  11. raptor50

    raptor50 New Member

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    hi everyone
    there are many ways to mount your sprockets. the main thing is to get the chain aliened with motor . i,v done it many ways never had a problem with any of them
     

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