homelite super 2 build

deacon

minor bike philosopher
Jan 15, 2008
8,117
3
0
north carolina
I bought a homelite super 2 chainsaw from a local junk dealer. He couldn't get it to start but swore to me that it did. According to him it belonged to his brother in law who died. He only cut wood on sunday with it.

Saw is a mess but it did start when I got it home and ran some cleaner though it.First problem I ran into for the bike application is the muffler is on the side not the rear. And of course it is the same said as the drive shaft. So if I run a muffler it is going to force me to mount the engine farther back than I would like.

Also it has a funky clutch thread not like any of my other saws. I don't think my welding is up to that so I'm going to con my neighbor one more time. I swear to god this is my last chainsaw build.

I chopped off most of the case so it would fit close to the bike. After I had worked the clutch off the chainsaw, I found that the starter rope was gone from the recoil assembly. I opened it up and found the rope there the handle had broken off. So I fixed that it wasn't much of a job.

I got it to run again but man it is loud without the muffler. It's gonna get way too much attention. I have no idea what the size is but there was a hand written 32c on it. I think that might be the size 32cc it is small I know that much.
 

Bikeguy Joe

Godfather of Motorized Bicycles
Jan 8, 2008
11,843
236
63
up north now
You should be able to get exhaust or tuned piped from the R/C boat guys at your local hobby shop, same engine as in a lot of the boats.
 

deacon

minor bike philosopher
Jan 15, 2008
8,117
3
0
north carolina
Thanks joe. I think I have enough angle that it won't hit the tire. I am considering not welding the clutch on but using it as a stop so that I can bolt on a pipe end cap. That will allow me to use 3/4 inch water pipe.
 

deacon

minor bike philosopher
Jan 15, 2008
8,117
3
0
north carolina
I got the engine mounted to the jungle scout bike lol. Thought I would put in the neighbor five year old for scale.


Bike is a twenty inch girlie bike with a 26" front fork. Adding the engine is the only other thing I have done to it. I might put the front brake back on it. I took it off when I thought I was going to put a WW on the front of the bike.

I rode it but the nut that holds the drive wheel on came off so I put it back on with epoxy in the threads. It won't ready to ride till tomorrow about the time it warms up enough to ride.

I almost forgot to mention this is the bike that threw me on my but and cracked my tail bone i think. Thing still hurts like the dickens. It is more stable now with the extra weight on it. It's a little wobbly to pedal but I don't plan to pedal it.
 
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deacon

minor bike philosopher
Jan 15, 2008
8,117
3
0
north carolina
In my search for the simplest and cheapest conversions I would like to enter this project.

First of all the bike conversion was a piece of cake. It required two donor bikes. One 20" sissy bike $8 and the front from an old huffy I got for twenty bucks before I knew better.

The engine is a small homelite chain saw about 33ccs. Since it ran I paid $40 bucks for it and the guy thought he was doing me a real favor. You can get a brand new one for a hundred more or less. I have no brand loyalty.

So I removed the bar and cut away the plastic case until the complete drive side of the saw was open. Since I don't have dremel, I used my trusty saber saw. At this point I made a discovery that I hope is going to work out well. The clutch bell was held on by a nut. I did a little of this and that but came back to an old WW idea. I removed the bell leaving me about an inch of shaft between the nut threads and the clutch assembly. I removed the spring held outer parts of the clutch assembly, but left the clutch thing that is kind of a nut, in place.

I drilled a hole in the center of a 3/4" galvanized pipe cap. I slid it over the shaft and rested it against the clutch thing. I made a spacer from a half inch nut by rounding it off with a grinder so that it would fit inside the 3/4" water pipe. I added a lock washer and I personally used some jb weld as locktite. I DO NOT recommend this kind of lock but I had already tested it to be sure it would work before I added it. Locktite red should do the trick.

Then I built the engine mount:

1. The first piece was an angle brace like those on cheap storage racks for the shop. I bought it at home depot. It is the kind with all the pre drilled holes. Actually I had a piece left over from a previous build. The ending is cupped in it. It sits on one side of the brace and is pressed against the other.

2. You need a little platform the same size as the saw more or less. It gets attached to the above brace just to give it some stability. Here is where I got stupid. I bought a 2'x2' piece of 3/8" plywood and cut a piece with the saw. In hindsight I could have used the saw bar for this. It would have been close enough to the right size when welded to the angle iron. Oh well next time. You want to secure the platform to the angle brace with bolts.

3. If you can find a spot to run a bolt through the saw, through the brace, and though the platform this is a good thing. I was able to find a spot that allowed me to do that. It was a tail on the end of the chainsaw.



4. You also need an open upper part of the frame as well. I use an 90 degree shelf bracket on the rear end of the platform angle. I bolt one end of the shelf brace to the platform.. Then on the front I bolt a flat piece of steel. I use a mending strip from the hardware store or anything like that..... then a simple flat steel top rail to connect the two.


5. This is where you add the strapping hinge. I was fortunate enough to have the bolt that went through the chainsaw's tail the platform's angle brace, the wooden platform, and then the hinge. With that one bolr I tied it all together.

6. I made sure that it was what I wanted, then I removed the engine and welded all the joints. I'm such a novice welder that I left the bots in place as well. Welding made the frame much more rigid but bolts with locktite would have worked as well.

7. I welded a cross piece to the bike frame to receive the hinge. I also used a U Bolt around the seat post to hold it while I welded it and to give it more security. I bolted then welded the hinge to the cross brace and had the basic of the engine mount done.

8. I added a scissor hinge to the engine side to keep it from moving side to side.

9. I added a down rod to the shelf brace that goes across the tire for the suicide clutch and the spring and turnbuckle.

10. The throttle is something new but seems to work. I used an old shifter like usual but instead of stripping the engine I drilled a small hole through the handle of the saw. Ran the cable through the handle and the trigger. The shifter tightens the trigger. had to add a spring because I used a junk cable but I will buy a new cable soon and the spring wont be necessary.

11. The suicide clutch is no more than a lever that runs from the cross member of the mount to the front of the bike where it has a gizmo to lock it in the up position for starting and at stop signs.

12. I added two pipe clamps that plumbers use around the saw engine to secure it to the frame the top rail of the frame and the platform are also inside the pipe clamp. they in effect hold the engine in place.

It sounds complicated but it is the simplest build yet. This is a very simple build and can be done reasonably inexpensively.





The platform makes it possible to build even with the WW without stripping them down completely. It should also solve the problem I had with the WW crappy attachment points.
 
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deacon

minor bike philosopher
Jan 15, 2008
8,117
3
0
north carolina
It's raining again today... I think my next project should be an ark... Bring the motor bikes in two by two...

Since I don't have a measuring tape in hectors, I think I'll coat my drive wheel with jb and sand. If I start now I should be able to get two or three coats on it before the roads dry up. I think that multiple thin coats is the answer to wear off. I could be wrong though.
 

deacon

minor bike philosopher
Jan 15, 2008
8,117
3
0
north carolina
I finally got to ride the bike it is awful.

The idle is way too high.

The engine bogs down when it hits a hill

The engine doesn't pickup when it is going down hill so there is no speed to bleed off.

I hope it is just the carb that needs adjusting. It could be just too small. It does have good compression so maybe there is hope for it. Also the tension might need to be adjusted. I'm hoping for good weather tomorrow so I can work on it and test it as I go.
 

deacon

minor bike philosopher
Jan 15, 2008
8,117
3
0
north carolina
I posted in another spot what I did today on this bike. The breather was almost completely stopped up. I cleaned and will try the bike tomorrow after I buy a new throttle cable and reattach it to the bike.http://motorbicycling.com/f36/new-question-mechanic-4632.html

I am going to reattach it without the hose clamps since the engine itself has mounting points. I might run one clamp over it as a safety valve kind of thing.
 
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deacon

minor bike philosopher
Jan 15, 2008
8,117
3
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north carolina
Progress report of sorts.

Well the engine is back on the bike without its case. I found out a good thing about the engine for a change. It has a great mounting arrangement. I can actually do a lot with that engine. It also started on the every first pull of the rope which was a pleasant surprise.

I did not get to ride it so I don't know what it will do on the road but I am hopeful. I'll make some new shots of it tomorrow as the weather will still be to cold to ride. I might take it out just for a really short test ride in the afternoon.

I learned a couple of things that might be worth passing on. Most of these carbs have the same kind of throttle system. If you have ever worked with one you know that many of them have a hard wire connected to the throttle and that is connected to the cable. Well I discovered by accident that a coat hanger can replace a missing hard wire. You can also shape the coat hanger to go around corners ect. An interesting thing to know.

Also learned how to make a cable holder for the end of the cable to attach to the engine frame. Just drill a hole where you want your cable to go. Then epoxy a 1/4 nut to the end of the cable, then epoxy a washer with a small hole for the cable to the end of the nut. when it is all dry epoxy the washer to the point where you drilled the hole for the cable.


also a simple cable splice for throttle cable without too much stress.

get yourself a crimp coupling run the cable end through make a loop then run it back though. Crimp it down then also crimp the cable itself then do the same to the other end linking the loops together.
 
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deacon

minor bike philosopher
Jan 15, 2008
8,117
3
0
north carolina
after all the crap I now know why the homelite engine seemed to bog down and perform so poorly, It is only 25cc. Who would have thought anyone would make a 25cc chainsaw. I could have bought a 25cc weed whacker for next to nothing. I really have to start taking time to research this stuff better.

It does mount up better and should last longer just because the engine case is better. Now that it is cleaned up it runs and starts pretty good. It will probably be my exercise bike engine. I think I might have to build a bigger bike though. 25cc is a little small to run to the store with.

It might be ideal to hang on the front of sarah's bike the one with the shocks. I need to switch the front end to do it but I have the 26" front end I put on the 20" bike if I decide to go that way. I need to test the 25cc bike today when it warms up a bit.
 

deacon

minor bike philosopher
Jan 15, 2008
8,117
3
0
north carolina
Well one thing about this build, the engine is small enough to mount on the front wheel. So I'm going to do a front wheel drive. 25cc on a front wheel should be enough to get the bike moving a little anyway.

If it does okay, I might try a 31cc weed whacker on the front next. I haven't had much success with them but I think I might do better if I figure out a better mount.

What I did do, is to switch the front fork out on the full suspension bike. I put a hard fork on it making it a rear suspension bike. I am going to build the homelite onto that frame.

I welded the engine frame but it is so bad I am going to weld it again tomorrow. I did look up the welding page to see what I had done wrong. I think I can do better next time. I am going to start doing the welds over till I get them right from now on. I'll get it eventually I hope.
 

deacon

minor bike philosopher
Jan 15, 2008
8,117
3
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north carolina
Well I redid the mount to a custom made for this engine and no other in the whole world will ever fit. Did some welding and drilling of new bolt holes but it is not happily resting over the front wheel. I even did this in a shop that is about thirty degrees and unheated.

One think I would caution you guys on. I haven't driven my car more than a hundred miles in the last year. I had to charge the battery on this cold morning to get it to start, so if you plan to use a four wheeler after having let it sit for months you might want to check the charge in advance.

It was a lot of trouble to go buy a pack of boles to secure the engine to the frame I built for it.
 

deacon

minor bike philosopher
Jan 15, 2008
8,117
3
0
north carolina
I haven't been able to ride it just yet but I did take a good look at it and man that lift rod makes a big difference in how the bike's front end looks. I'll try to shoot some pictures today.

now if I could work with fiberglass I would build this inverted pyramid to cover the engine and top of the front wheel. complete with air scoops and a headlight.
 
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5-7HEAVEN

Well-Known Member
Aug 2, 2008
2,540
146
63
deacon, i learn so many tidbits by reading your blogs. Keep up the good work.

With this weak homelite engine, place it in front then add another weak engine in the rear.

Two weak engines working together make for a strong and peppy combination.^5

deacon, I know it's easier to mount the front engine on a solid fork. My Staton front engine kit wouldn't mount on my girlie bike's suspension fork. I had to mount the front engine on a different bike I call "Mr. Hyde".

Please let me know if you figure out how to mount a front engine on a suspension fork. That's what I really need is a front suspension fork. The bike and I take a pounding on the street.
 

deacon

minor bike philosopher
Jan 15, 2008
8,117
3
0
north carolina
Actually there are two mounting points on my granddaiughters suspension bike's front end. One is a brace that is connected to the down part of the tubes. Then there are the two end of the wishbone that have a connector at the top.

I would weld or bolt a cross bar on the down tube brace I think. that would have the engine hooked ot the wheel and would ride on top of the tire. If you weld to the tubes themself you would have the engine solid and the tire bouncing on it.


I loved that suspension bike it's why im trying to save the rear part anyway. I might just put the front fork on the jungle bike I stripped the front fork from. Then I would have two 1/2 ***** suspension bikes
 
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comfortableshoes

New Member
Jul 22, 2008
606
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Beverly, MA USA
If you weren't going to weld, you could make brackets. the top bracket on the front suspension moves with the tire, the whole bottom parts of the suspension moves with the tired. I'd be afraid that if you welded it that you might damage the tube and destroy the ability of the suspension to work. You could built brackets that camp to the moving tube to hold the engine. Also you could build a bracket that attaches at the quick release that wouldn't damage the effectiveness of the suspension.

Each bracket could have a hinge or pivot point in it to lift the engine. however if you were doing a geared build you could set it and leave it.
 

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deacon

minor bike philosopher
Jan 15, 2008
8,117
3
0
north carolina
wow correct me if im wrong.

The top of the tubes move with the BIKE FRAME the bottom of the tubes move with the wheels. If you weld or bolt to the top of the tubes everytime the wheel bounces it will bang the engine...

If you hook to the brace on the bottom of the tube it will ride with the wheel it should move up as the wheel does. Still it is rough on the engine for sure. Thats why I switched to a solid fork for the mount,