Helpful suggestions wanted

4Fun

New Member
May 16, 2008
5
0
0
Grand Rapids MI
I'm looking to build a motorized bicycle with the following main goals.
-Very likely pull a bicycle trailer
-Economy budget
-Easy to accomplish conversion
-Back rest for my sometimes arthritic back, i.e. low rider/crank forward

I'm looking for a comfortable ride for fairly long hauls. Something like a low rider/semi recumbent is what I'm interested in.

I do have a 2cycle Craftsman:confused: (I think it's a)49cc still fully in tact which runs great.

I do not have the bicycle, reduction transmission, clutch, nor mounting stuff. I'm thinking the bike should be heavy duty.

I have considered a hybrid system with gas engine on the trailer hooked up to an electrical gen of some sort, maybe some batteries, and then send a power wire to the bike motor. But that seems extravagant, somewhat heavy and costly. But see, I also want to do some camping too, so I could use power for lights/laptop. But lets keep the motorized bike as cost and design efficient as possible.

Thanks in advance for whatever assistance. (^)
 

4Fun

New Member
May 16, 2008
5
0
0
Grand Rapids MI
Worksman PAV?
Nice try but their new prices seem too costly for my budget, plus not enough stability in turns.

The crank forward or semi-recumbent idea is optional but desired. The seat is not hard to convert to include a back rest as well as including some suspension shock absorption.

I'll probably end up with something used to keep the cost low.

So far all I've seen that comes close is Schwinn StingRay. But I do not want an elongaged front fork nor just one speed. In contrast, I want it to be rugged and better handling.
 

deacon

minor bike philosopher
Jan 15, 2008
8,117
3
0
north carolina
I built mine for stability first. Twenty inch rear wheel for easy of mounting and dismounting. Crank from the same 20" bike to get it low enough so my knees didn't have to go so high when I pedaled it. used the kiddie bike handle bars to get them up so I would bang them.

the avatar is a picture of it picture there before I switched the wheel back. It did suffer from not much speed though. The 20" crank is in use now on a bike with a 26" rear wheel. it still makes pedaling easier with the seat down and my center of gravity lower.
 

Dave31

Moderator
Staff member
Mar 1, 2008
11,204
29
38
Aztlán, Arizona
Allright I need a helpful suggestion, I've searched online but keep getting two answer's. To determine frame size do you measure the seat tube or the top tube? And if it's the top tube, how would you measure a woman's frame?
 

nogoodnic

New Member
Jan 29, 2008
509
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Shelby MI
forum1.freakbikenation.com
You might want to take a look at the Nirve Deviate, they pop up on e-bay directly from Nirve occasionaly for just over $200 shipped. I know that you said that you didn't want the long forks but I'll tell you that the ergonomics and handling of this bike are awsome and would make a great motorized bike. I have two right now that I really enjoy riding and plan to motor one of them. In my garage I have close to 30 bikes of all shapes and sizes and the Deviate is the most comfortable of all of them...Kelly

Heres a shot of one in action in a plank race at a Freakbike Militia Ride last summer.
 

deacon

minor bike philosopher
Jan 15, 2008
8,117
3
0
north carolina
That does look comfortable.

For me the comfort is in the ability to get on and off the bike easily and the crank being low enough not to stretch my knees to the painful point. And of course handlebars that aren't so low they bang my knees.
 

nogoodnic

New Member
Jan 29, 2008
509
0
0
Shelby MI
forum1.freakbikenation.com
Deacon, the feet forward position would probably work really well for you. The seat height is just above the height of the rear tire and you can easily have both feet flat on the ground. Also the center of gravity is alot lower than on a regular bike to aid in your balance issues. there is zero wheel flop and it handles like a dream. this is probably the beat engineered bike that I have ever ridden...Kelly