Has anyone registered as... a Motorcycle?

Science Abuse

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Feb 12, 2020
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The legal jist in Ohio is, if I have more than 50cc, I don't have a moped, I have a "motorcycle".
Of course I'm just discovering this after completing my 80cc build.
There's also the stipulation that the bike must -not be able- to exceed 20mph. Meaning its not enough to simply enforce speed limits, I must have a governor on my "moped" to prevent exceeding 20 mph... or it's a "motorcycle". Funny, most cars can do 100mph and we're still allowed to have them

So, alright OBMV, let's do this, I want to get this thing titled so I can ride it. Motorcycle it is.
I have brakes, lights, brake lights, turn signals, mirrors, and a savage top speed of about 30mph.

Has anyone explored this in practice?
 
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For the bureaucratic problems you're going to encounter, it'd be much simpler to buy a motor driven cycle.
While that's definitely on the table, I've already got this one. It would be nice to ride it wirhout worrying about The Man, but I guess that's life.
 

Sidewinder Jerry

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Dec 19, 2011
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While that's definitely on the table, I've already got this one. It would be nice to ride it wirhout worrying about The Man, but I guess that's life.
The simple solution would then be to stay under 20 mph and obey all traffic laws. It's doubtful a cop is going to pull you over when you're doing 20 mph or less just to check your engine cc size. A bicycle computer is cheap way to have a speedometer.
 
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The simple solution would then be to stay under 20 mph and obey all traffic laws. It's doubtful a cop is going to pull you over when you're doing 20 mph or less just to check your engine cc size. A bicycle computer is cheap way to have a speedometer.
Already living by those rules.
But this is Ohio, we're famous for pulling people over for dubious reasons. Ohio requires my motorized conveyance to have tags, and I have none. It's a bullseye on my back. :)
 

Sidewinder Jerry

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Dec 19, 2011
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Already living by those rules.
But this is Ohio, we're famous for pulling people over for dubious reasons. Ohio requires my motorized conveyance to have tags, and I have none. It's a bullseye on my back. :)
That explains your legal situation a lot better. They do sell 49 cc stickers. You could also adjust the drive ratio to where the bike can't do over 20 mph in order to get your tag.
 

MEASURE TWICE

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On some 4 stroke engines there are two different hp on the same displacement by having the intake cam lobe a little bigger. The greater amount of fuel air mixture bumps up a 8hp to a 9.9hp. Two stroke engine doesn't have valves using cams though. My bike I licensed but of Off Highway Vehicle, meaning it is dirt bike where allowed and I do have spark arrester muffler as required. I've had a Ranger about ask that, but mostly just the bike a DIY build throws them for a loop.
 

Stinger45

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Feb 27, 2021
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The legal jist in Ohio is, if I have more than 50cc, I don't have a moped, I have a "motorcycle".
Of course I'm just discovering this after completing my 80cc build.
There's also the stipulation that the bike must -not be able- to exceed 20mph. Meaning its not enough to simply enforce speed limits, I must have a governor on my "moped" to prevent exceeding 20 mph... or it's a "motorcycle". Funny, most cars can do 100mph and we're still allowed to have them

So, alright OBMV, let's do this, I want to get this thing titled so I can ride it. Motorcycle it is.
I have brakes, lights, brake lights, turn signals, mirrors, and a savage top speed of about 30mph.

Has anyone explored this in practice?
Just some anecdotal experience from Oregon. Years ago, I ordered a Chinese 200cc dual sport motorcycle. It had everything to be completely legal to register and title. The DMV, however, required a letter of authenticity and DEQ to do the paperwork. Ok, I could see that, but I went back and forth with the DMV for at least 4 months, meeting all of their requirements, and even quoting the Oregon title and registration laws back to them to remind them that I had met ALL of the requirements contained therein. Finally, and under a different supervisor, the lady said "I don't see any reason that we cannot register this motorcycle". I was blown away with relief, but it was very disconcerting that it was just a "whim" of one rational person that allowed the registration of my motorcycle. So the bottom line is "good luck" with something that is less substantial such as a home-built moped than an actual compliant motorcycle that was backed by documentation and a lot of determination on my part. BTW, I have a home-built 80cc moped in my garage, but I can see that it could be far more trouble to ride than it is worth. I also have an 800cc V-Twin, and I think I will be riding that instead!