Front Engine Install On A Suspension Fork?

5-7HEAVEN

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Aug 2, 2008
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Has anyone mounted a front engine on a bike with late-model front suspension(not the springer fork)?


I was gonna convert my girlie bike to twin Mitsubishi friction driven engines. The bike already had rear Staton setup, and my thinking was "More is better." Years ago, a Rockshox fork was installed on it to lessen the shocking impact of an electric hub and 80 lbs of batteries. This e-bike had too many disadvantages, so I stripped the electricals and converted to gas engine.

When I tried to mount the engine bracket onto the suspension fork, it was a no-go.:(

Has anyone successfully made custom brackets for this combination? There is VERY little "meat" on the suspension fork's "bridge" to build on.

FWIW, because I couldn't install the front engine on the girlie bike, the twin Mits engines were subsequently mounted on a new Raleigh 7-speed cruiser with solid front fork. Due to the extra weight and solid fork, the ride is VERY harsh. As soon as I find resolution to this issue, I'll move the girlie's bike's suspension fork over to "Mr. Hyde," my dual-engined monstrous creation.

Thanks for any help.:ride2:
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Honey, it's just a bicycle. and i REALLY need it to excercise, and to ride it to work.(hehe)
 
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xPosTech

The Old Master Motorized Bicycle Builder
Oct 23, 2008
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Should be a piece of cake. Mount it as if you could only mount to the axles. I.E. two straight legs to the axles. Now fix two arms (to wrap the forks if wanted and) tied to the front V brake braze-ons. All MTB type suspension forks I've see have them. The two arms are just for the mount to "hold on". All the weight to be carried on the straight legs.

If you wanna get fancy, make the mount from a nice looking fork with the steerer cut off. One with a curve to the legs will give a better angle mating with the dropouts on the suspension fork. You'll have to grind off both sets of lawyer lips.

The whole shebang should look something like a rear triangle rotated up.

You will probably have to use a rear axle or skewer (stronger) to get the length of axle needed.

Good luck.

Ted
 

5-7HEAVEN

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Thanks for tips, Ted.

What are "lawyer lips"?

I intend to use legs to support the rear motor mount. The front struts will act as a hoist to raise/lower the engine.
 

xPosTech

The Old Master Motorized Bicycle Builder
Oct 23, 2008
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Lawyer lips are the ridges on the bottom of vertical dropouts that keep the wheel from falling out if the axle or QR loosens up a little. The )&(*)*&%^ things that make you back off the nuts almost all the way to get the wheel off. Obvious name.

Older bikes didn't have them.

Let us know how this works. I haven't actually done it but no reason it shouldn't work just fine.

Ted
 

5-7HEAVEN

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Aug 2, 2008
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Thanks for explaining, Ted.

The axle struts, v-bosses, downtubes and downtube brace should be enough connections to make the front engine install on a suspension fork. Right now the engine mounts on a solid front fork, and the ride without suspension is VERY harsh. All the stuff in my front basket want to jump out when I hit a crack in the road.:ride:

After doing some research, I found a front pannier rack for suspension forks. This one is cheap enough, and should help make the install easier:
 

xPosTech

The Old Master Motorized Bicycle Builder
Oct 23, 2008
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Front pannier forks. What do they do to low speed maneuverability? You know . . . performance issue at the Roadeo.

Ted
 

xPosTech

The Old Master Motorized Bicycle Builder
Oct 23, 2008
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Speaking of the Roadeo. I used to live in Houston. They have lots of COBs. Cops On Bikes. Ever watch them on their fixies? Stop dead at a light or stop sign without falling over?

Can you do that? I sure can't.

They stay up by twitching the handlebars back and forth. You wouldn't be able to do that with an engine or panniers on the forks (if you can do it now:rolleyes:).

Ted

PS You forgot the pannier rack link.
 

5-7HEAVEN

Well-Known Member
Aug 2, 2008
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Thanks for explaining, Ted.

The axle struts, v-bosses, downtubes and downtube brace should be enough connections to make the front engine install on a suspension fork. Right now the engine mounts on a solid front fork, and the ride without suspension is VERY harsh. All the stuff in my front basket want to jump out when I hit a crack in the road.:ride:

After doing some research, I found a front pannier rack for suspension forks. This one is cheap enough, and should help make the install easier:
Delta Shock Treatment Front Rack - Bicycles and gear for every type of riding - Giant, Fox, Diamondback, Haro, Felt
 

5-7HEAVEN

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Aug 2, 2008
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Yes, I've seen the avid bike riders on fixies or light bikes at the lights, balancing at a stop. Neither I nor this bike "Mr. Hyde" can or want to do that.

Manueverability is something ya don't have with a front engine install, especially with a basket full of groceries at a crawl. Balance and center of gravity is way off. However, once this heavy bike gets rolling, the ride is awesome, especially with both engines in midrange at 20 mph. It handles like a 1967 Chevy Impala with a 427" big-block engine, aka land barge.

It really fits the description of a moped, which is a motorized pedacycle.

To park the bike and keep it from tipping, I use a standard bike stand AND a rear bike stand. I also tie a nylon rope from the right handle bar grip to seatpost, because the left-side handlebar wants to kiss the fuel tank. And the entire bicycle wants to lay flat on its left side.

I think I need a Whizzer rear bike stand.

The pannier rack weighs less than a can of soda, so extra weight is negligible. I won't use panniers because it draws unwanted attention from casual roaming thieves.

I've got my trusty front basket, which also doubles as my shift gate and positive shift stop for the lever that raises/lowers the engine.
 
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xPosTech

The Old Master Motorized Bicycle Builder
Oct 23, 2008
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You need a setup like the old Schwinn lock on the head tube. It locks the fork. I see them every now and then. Most even have the keys. :)

Ted
 

5-7HEAVEN

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Aug 2, 2008
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No, Ted, the shift gate and positive shift stop perform like how aftermarket transmission shifters do. There's a console(front basket), a shift gate(the back wall of the front basket, and the positive shift stop(scrap steel plate "sandwich" on the back wall of the front basket). The stop prevents the shifter(lever) from too much travel and locks the lever in "gear". The lever is spring-loaded, so when you nudge the lever out from under the stop, it "jumps" into neutral with the friction roller lifted off the tire.

The last thing I need is another flipping key. I ran outa gas halfway up the hill from my house because the tank was locked. I pedalled home to get the gas cap key. When I opened my house door with my set of keys, there was my gas cap key on my set of keys.rotfl

I need to motor down to Checkers to buy a siphon hose. After tasting gas fumes last week while filling the engines' tanks, I need the hose with the suction bulb.:D

My answers usually pop out after sleeping.

I need to sleep.
 

xPosTech

The Old Master Motorized Bicycle Builder
Oct 23, 2008
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Don't want another, huh? (I was talking about the Schwinn anti-theft fork.)

How 'bout a remote? That would be kinda cool. Would take a small solenoid. Maybe on the bottom tube? Or under the top tube. A plunger into the steer tube and steerer.

Wouldn't want to be tooling along a sweeper and have the battery die and lock it. So battery would only lock or unlock, not keep it unlocked. Or battery would just unlock - use a manual lock.

Well . . . I sometimes have dead batteries. Wouldn't want to have to get the jumper cables out when leaving the grocery store.

Never mind. :oops:

Ted
 

5-7HEAVEN

Well-Known Member
Aug 2, 2008
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Ted, I'm "ADD"(attention deficit disorder). I have wayyy too many stuff in my head right now.

What's in my head?

Suspension fork for front engine install.
HT reserve tank auto feed into engine tank.
100-watt alternator and bright lights.
Staton gearbox modification for 5:1 gear reduction.
Staton friction drive assembly modification to chain drive.
Titan drive assembly to front drive.
6hp engine push trailer.
dual Happy Time engine installation.
Nine engines and two bikes to feed.

Work, college and married life seem to get in the way.

Then there's that '57 BelAir coupe and my surfboards being neglected.

Thank God the kids are grownups!
 

5-7HEAVEN

Well-Known Member
Aug 2, 2008
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Well, I bought that Delta front-rack mount and I'm glad I did. It installed easily and securely on my Rockshox fork and girlie cruiser, albeit with no instructions except pictures on the box. I set the engine assembly onto the bike for preliminary fitment. Everything lined up for a solid mounting, and pannier bags could probably fit, even with the engine installed.

When this school semester is over next week, I'll fabricate brackets which will attach to this rack and assist in mounting the Station front friction drive. Then I'll transfer everything over to my dual-engined bike.

More to follow in 12 days.^5
__________________
Honey, it's just a bicycle. and i REALLY need it to excercise, and to ride it to work.(hehe)