DIY Brake Ideas for LF's Buggy Bike

Jul 22, 2008
656
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16
Northglenn,Colorado
I need a little meeting of the minds here. Look at the pics below for reference.
I have just a coaster brake on my Trike and the other day my chain derailed and suddenly I had no brakes whatsoever.
So up front is my Worksman fork designed for my drum brake wheel and no provision for a caliper or V brake whatsoever.
So replace that fork? Sure except that Worksman fork stem is way too long. I couldn't find my ruler so I used a string but you can obviously see how much longer that worksman fork is.
I also though that maybe I can simply cut the frame tube down to accept another fork but there's a reason for the long length and I don't want to compromise this frames integrity so unless I find a fork with a long stem this fork stays.
And the drum brake wheel sure I can simply install that back on,lace up the sprocket and call it a day but that sprocket isn't 100% true,and it's coming off the hub.
I'm about to get my 3 speed on there and although it's a coaster there's no way I can get it to work up front. I did look at that one mod someone did to a swing bike converting a coaster to a cable brake but I know these 3 speeds are complicated in there and I don't even want to deal with it so that's out.
I also thought maybe I can have someone weld me some bolt stays for a V brake up front but these forks are rather thin as it is.
Then I thought maybe a cable brake for the rear axle. At least if my chain ever derails again I still have that.
There has to be a rather inexpensive fix for this. How do lawn tractors slow down besides engine braking? How about go carts? Is there a way I can install cable brakes on my rear wheels?
(The rear wheels have no frame going around them)
 

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xPosTech

The Old Master Motorized Bicycle Builder
Oct 23, 2008
209
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0
SETexas
V-brake studs are usually brazed on which will not hurt the fork legs a bit. You can get a couple of braze-ons at a bike shop a $ or two apiece.

Another option would be a heavy L bracket between the fender and fork steerer for caliper brakes. That would drop your fender the thickness of the L bracket, though.

Hmmm . . . maybe a band around the bottom of the steerer/top of the fork arms with a stud for calipers? Have to be long reach for fat fendered tires but should work. Like a heavy duty hose clamp with a stud sticking out. As far down on the steerer tube as you can get. Sheldon Brown may have written something on this.

Lawn tractors usually use a disk brake on the transaxle. Very crude and unreliable at best.

Disk brake hubs at front or rear would still require welded or brazed on mounts and re-lacing the wheels.

Can't you just find a brick wall to stop? What? . . .oh . . . you don't always stop in the same place. Gotcha.

Ted
 
Jul 22, 2008
656
0
16
Northglenn,Colorado
I'm digging that L bracket idea. It would be nice if I can keep that fork because I like the fender.
The other forum has a solution to with extending the replacement fork with the v brake and suspension by welding on an extension from a salvage fork but I may not be able to keep that fender.
Your idea for an L bracket is quite simple.
I need to get out there and see how that fender is attached.
 

xPosTech

The Old Master Motorized Bicycle Builder
Oct 23, 2008
209
0
0
SETexas
Take a look at Sheldon's article on drop bolts. If you use an L bracket (rising from the fender) it will be the opposite of a drop bolt. The hose clamp with stud I mentioned would be a bolt without the drop.

Ted
 

xPosTech

The Old Master Motorized Bicycle Builder
Oct 23, 2008
209
0
0
SETexas
I would consider long & hard. They advise:

Designed for use on rear dropouts, but can also be used on most front forks too by simply filing off the keyway!

I'm looking at the vertical dropouts on a fork and the picture of the bracket. If you file off that keyway, what is gonna keep the bracket from rotating under hard braking? :eek:

Think panic stop.

Edit: Thinking about it some more. You could modify it by drilling and mounting a brace between it and the fork blade to lock it in position. A simple 1" to 2" arm would also locate it as close to or as far from the blade as you want as long as you didn't go further than ~90° from the blade.

I think I will christen it a "lawyer link". rotfl

They are opening themselves up to some liability issues with the advice they are giving. I bet the manufacturer has some strong warnings about modifications.

Ted
 
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Long&Black

New Member
Nov 24, 2008
69
0
0
Georgia
Yeah, with that I planned on making an anti-rotation bracket.

The other alternative is to weld a bracket onto the front fork and have the thing rechromed.
 

xPosTech

The Old Master Motorized Bicycle Builder
Oct 23, 2008
209
0
0
SETexas
You could recreate the little latch hook for a garden gate stud in stronger metal and chrome it. Or better yet shape it like an upside down lower case h. The "hook" to fit around the fork blade.

If you do all the polishing before you take it to the plater it's a bit cheaper. All the work in chroming is in the polishing. The bigger the piece the longer it takes to polish. So you won't save a whole lot with something that small but I like to save anything I can.

If you ever have to do any work to a large chromed piece that will have to be re-chromed afterwords, take it to the plater first and explain what you're gonna do. They will open a work order and "un-chrome" it for you.

Do your mods (and polishing), then take it back to have re-chromed. It should save you some money, especially if there was any brazing involved.

Ted