coaster hub noise???

Jan 17, 2015
591
20
18
ca.
My hub makes click-it-t-click noise,but if I rotate the sprocket back a little noise goes away..it kinda grabs too..any thoughts..is it just wore out. I've got three of em and each one does the same in varying ways...ive never used coasters so, no idea here.
 
Last edited:

MEASURE TWICE

Well-Known Member
Jul 13, 2010
2,454
551
113
CA
I've heard of this on a coaster brake hub, if that is what your talking about. It must be worn or broken.

Individual parts replacement may be possible, but that would probably be difficult to find parts.

If it is not just the inner parts, but the part you can thread all new spokes to replace, then the job of spokes installation and truing probably means the time it takes would mean best a whole new or used know working hub.

Check that the clamp along the stay, if it is a coaster brake type is in place correctly.

http://sheldonbrown.com/searchResul....com/&ref=search.yahoo.com/&ss=2776j803934j12

Search results from Sheldon Brown

http://www.sheldonbrown.com/creaks.html Check Here
 
Last edited:
Jan 17, 2015
591
20
18
ca.
Went to Sheldon..gonna try bending spring..although I don't know what bending means..stretching..to apply more pressure against driver ...given it a go.
 

bairdco

a guy who makes cool bikes
Aug 18, 2009
6,549
238
63
living the dream in southern california
What brand of hub? If it's a cheap chinese hub, like a hi-stop, falcon, kt, or some other odd brand, that clicking isn't "normal."

Those hubs have a high failure rate. And I'm not just talking on motorized bikes. Cheap hub failure is the number one cause of returns on walmart bikes, and that's from out of shape people who barely ride (pedal) anywhere.

Coaster brake failure can be catastrophic. Meaning, your brakes could fail, your bearings seize or the whole hub just falls apart.

Not exactly something you want to happen cruising along at 30+ with your headphones on.

My advice, is get a shimano or older bendix hub, inspect, grease, and maintain it often, and ride safe.
 

MEASURE TWICE

Well-Known Member
Jul 13, 2010
2,454
551
113
CA
Can attest to that! It was a friend that knew nothing much about bikes. The clamp was missing. The reason it was missing was maybe the Walmart person that assembled did not make it adjust to its tightest position on the strap. I don't mean tight enough for the screw and nut, but that could be suspect too.

Sheldon mentions that when the strap is loose it moves when pedaling and braking and loosens up the fastener.

When I told my friend I would put the strap clamp back on and did, I thought it would fix it. It did not. The inside was already $&**ed and he took the bike back for a refund.

The pedals would I remember be turning and did not freewheel and yep I heard grinding.
 
Jan 17, 2015
591
20
18
ca.
I had a chance to get a older Bendix at the swap meet..was 30$ a price I should have pay'd. One of the hubs is a cranbrook. The other is a black one with the same two lines circling the hub on each end. If I see a coaster wheel, how can I tell its a Shimano??
 
Last edited:
Jan 17, 2015
591
20
18
ca.
Ok ya'll, should I even continue with runnin a coaster? The reason I'm even considering, is because this frame build was to be just a"lets try this, ok lets try that" well I like it now....but it does not have v brake stands.. That's why I'm doing coaster. I've welded brake stands on before but...i have not got them right, and they like to be placed right. Any tips on getting the stands right would be awlright. Dang hold the presses...horseshoe...duh..ill be back..and thx!
 
Last edited:

bairdco

a guy who makes cool bikes
Aug 18, 2009
6,549
238
63
living the dream in southern california
All newer hubs have the brand stamped on the brake arm.

Almost all cheap hubs are copies of the shimano. Some of the parts will interchange, too, but they're crap.

$30 bucks for a bendix is a little steep, unless it's new, or an older red band (has a red band painted in the center. ) I wouldn't pay more than $10.

Strapping the brake arm to the frame is essential. Use a good quality strap. Hose clamp wil snap.

One of the hazards of not strapping the arm down, is it can rotate, jam the guts, and start pedaling forward like a fixie.

Then you get catapulted over the bars.

Using a freewheel hub is your choice.
 
Jan 17, 2015
591
20
18
ca.
That Bendix did have a red band down the middle! The guy said "it was a old school schwinn. I seen the Bendix on the arm, and from talk here I knew it was desirable. The rim in the pic is vbrake compatible. I'll just pack the bearings and run it, knowing ill have emergency brakes. After running nexus 3 & 4 speeds, I prolly wont be satisfied with single. So the engine braking is the drive behind this set up.
 

Attachments

Last edited:

MEASURE TWICE

Well-Known Member
Jul 13, 2010
2,454
551
113
CA
My bike has to be the best in that regard then. I have two front wheels that are heavy duty spoke, and no pedals at all. Yep Registration is only Off Road Legal for dirt bike riding. Newest to be is my used Honda foot spring loaded foot pegs going in place of too slippery cheap mini bike pegs.

But hey, I had actually just sawed a junk bike front fork with the bosses already on them for the V-brakes. Then I welded the parts right on to the fork on the existing frame I was needing to have V-brakes as I was not using any coaster brakes.

For the rear brakes I used some of the parts from the junk bike rear mountings for the V-brakes. Other stuff I simulated the bosses for the rear with large nut welded to angle iron. The angle iron welded to the rear stay top sections. Due to the front for being steel but the back stays being alloy, this is why I had to improvise.

One thing I should mention, is if you widen the stays for a sheave or sprocket, you should do that first before welding the bosses fro the V-brake attachment points for the rear wheel. I did not and then later extended the left side brake shoe with a sort of hair brain way of having the brake pad on the left rear reach the rim OK.

OK laugh;)

*********************excuse*****
Actually I had to modify the brake shoe on on side, when I had to replace the sheave that was not as low profile as the home made one. Only parts to make the home made sheave from steel pulley was more costly that just buying a Whizzer Clone Sheave.

If only I could go back in time a save a bunch of pressed stamped steel washing machine pulleys from the trash!
*******************************

I made an extra and keep it on hand so that when the pads wear out I already have another modified ready to fix up in the field.
 
Last edited:
Jan 17, 2015
591
20
18
ca.
Me laugh...all my ideas are hair brained...oh except one...the idea of starting a bike build...even putting the horseshoe vbrake cut off a fork on my 'del rio' I ended up not getting the angle right, not realizing it mattered..best results are when the horseshoe is at a 90 to the rim....maybe this time
 

MEASURE TWICE

Well-Known Member
Jul 13, 2010
2,454
551
113
CA
I tried to remember what I did to jig it up. I think for somethings I did, was to have shoes that were new, but worn in just a little.

Took the v-brakes and had them actuated by a cable to close on the bike they were going onto. Some c-clamps to hold temporarily the v-brakes to the fork. Then use blue dye and scribe mark on fork.

Figure some way of removing the brake parts that would melt from the weld heat and still keep other parts camped to the fork.

Sizzle away!

True or not exactly 90 degree, but the shoes will wear and have surface area all filled in after a while. Braking may not be as good.

I say it looks kind of strange having half the round of a fork welded to another fork to accomplish the front v-brakes. I could go and use a die grinder and remove and polish over I suppose.

Some of my more recent thoughts are to tack weld some metal only to have it removed later. It would facilitate a temporary jig to make it easy to get the foot peg brackets at two angles that are different from the existing metal surface I used on the old pegs.

This would be so much easier than trying to use clamps. I would use just enough tacking with a little chuck of metal that both get removed once all the necessary other is welded up.

Starting out, if the tack for just a very small amount of welding is not at the exact correct angle, I would get the die grinder out a little early. Then start over.

Maybe even use thin enough metal that could be tacked and bent. Then when exactly right on the mark, I could add more filler tack. From there you know the rest.
 
Last edited: