Beware Of Milk Crates Mounted On Rear Rack

stevennf94

New Member
Sep 3, 2020
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Newfoundland, Canada
A couple weeks ago I mounted a blue milk crate on the rear rack of my bike. It made it very difficult to get on and off my bike. I went for a ride and forgot about the milk crate. When I went to get off my bike my leg hit the crate and I slowly tipped and fell down. My left foot was flat on the ground and it twisted my foot and I sprained my ankle and mid foot. I have been on crutches now for 18 days so far. Its starting to heal pretty good and I'm starting to get close to being able to put my weight on my foot again. I should be walking again in another week or so. Hopefully someone else can learn from my mistakes and buy proper panier bags or not forget that they have to get off the bike differently.
 

Loop

Active Member
May 27, 2020
124
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S.Knoxville
Had one of those for a rear rack I had on a mountain bike I rode as a kid, made a good trunk but it looked silly and stuck up too tall.
 

5-7HEAVEN

Well-Known Member
Aug 2, 2008
2,575
157
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I have stuff on my rear rack.

I had a 4-liter tank on my rack.
How could I miss that?

Now I have a shorter 2.5liter oblong tank, so it's no longer a problem.

You have to remember what you have on your rack.

It's not the milk crate.
It's that you forgot you had that crate behind you.

This applies to all 2-wheeled riders.

LOL, have you seen what riders stack on their bicycles in third world countries?
 
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MEASURE TWICE

Well-Known Member
Jul 13, 2010
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CA
My banana seat on my bike is a bit high for me. The extra padding I made for off road makes it that way, but I know when getting off my bike to take caution. I bend the knee of the leg that is going to go over the seat. Then I seem to have less strain. Bike falling over is no fun. I have to see where I could add something to allow to carry stuff on my OHV bike, no pedals. Wearing a pack is not very good for the back. Not much room around the top bar with gas tank, but looking to get creative. Maybe two smaller areas near that so even out the weight and no stick out and get in the way.
 

5-7HEAVEN

Well-Known Member
Aug 2, 2008
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I have really short legs.

At times, I have to do a kung fu crescent kick to clear whatever's on my rack.

Sometimes I throw my leg over the top tube, then slide back.

I also had a milk crate years ago.

Now I'm building a bike with a shorter frame.

I'm getting older,
I REALLY have to watch my mount and dismount.
 

Loop

Active Member
May 27, 2020
124
72
28
46
S.Knoxville
I have stuff on my rear rack.

I had a 4-liter tank on my rack.
How could I miss that?

Now I have a shorter 2.5liter oblong tank, so it's no longer a problem.

You have to remember what you have on your rack.

It's not the milk crate.
It's that you forgot you had that crate behind you.

This applies to all 2-wheeled riders.

LOL, have you seen what riders stack on their bicycles in third world countries?
Dad in the seat, mom on the rack a child on her lap two on the top tube in front of dad ,,,,
 

5-7HEAVEN

Well-Known Member
Aug 2, 2008
2,575
157
63
True story.....

Yesterday, at 7pm I saw a family of 7 on bicycles, pedaling thru the shopping mall.

They were heading towards the steepest 200-meter hill on my route to work.

The 10 yo boys on their bikes were shirtless and barefooted.

Followed by mom.

Next came Dad.
He had a toddler on a seat on his rear rack,
plus he was carrying AN INFANT! in one arm!!

None had lights, but Dad had a bicycle helmet.

Go figure.
 
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5-7HEAVEN

Well-Known Member
Aug 2, 2008
2,575
157
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Hey wait!

I've had several bicycles with engines on the back rack.

You never want to forget lifting your leg high, on mount and dismount!:)
 

Citi-sporter

Active Member
Jun 16, 2014
196
33
28
North Bend, Or,
Both my motorized bikes are 21" men's frames and I can lift my leg over the top tube while leaning the bike over at 40 degrees. I've had a number of Honda Trail 50/90's with milk crates on the rear rack, step through frames are easy to get your leg over.
 

MEASURE TWICE

Well-Known Member
Jul 13, 2010
2,450
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CA
I've learned about tipping the bike at angle to make easier too. But as I am only legal off road, trails are not flat. I have to be sure that both or either one can stabilize the bike once I get on. Additionally swinging a leg quickly I try to avoid and less change pulling a muscle.
 
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Davideo

Active Member
Feb 25, 2020
138
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Yes!
Tip the bike at an angle upon mounting and dismounting, with rear engine or milk crate.
Good advice for people with E-Bike battery on rear carriers too. Discovered that myself from first hand experience.
 

MEASURE TWICE

Well-Known Member
Jul 13, 2010
2,450
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CA

I have fairly good ground clearance, but some 15 inch deep ruts had me lift the bike out. The rear wheel is 26" & front 24". The seat being padded heavily, initial getting in the saddle I have leg bent at knee. Then I extend leg back out, it squashes down, an I'm set to pull start engine. I can have only one foot flat on ground or both with just tips of boots on ground. In the picture both feet on ground easily but pegs were dug in, was not going to move. I got better at riding next to large ruts, but here I chickened out and had not enough clearance.
 
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