Being more knowledgeable about my first build

JudeTheRandomDude

New Member
Sep 14, 2019
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Hey everybody, I'm a noob and I kinda don't know what the **** I'm doing..
I've watched a few tutorials as well as scrolling down a handful of threads on here, but I always seem to get confused because there's always a group of people saying one thing and then another group disagreeing saying another and I'm just like... I just wanna build and ride my frigging' bike
Can someone please tell me what kind of bikes are most compatible (as in being a decent/universal fit) with the 80cc 2 stroke engine, What kind of tools do I need? and where can I find good accessories for my bike like headlights, a speedometer, and brakes. Is it possible for me to get hand brakes on a motorized bike? Also why are people saying to get rid of fenders all together instead getting something more durable and reliable? how else am I suppose to keep dirt and water from splashing up on me and my engine?
If there are already threads, videos the most accurate and not based on any bias opinions covering a topic similar to mine, it'd be greatly appreciated!
 
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allen standley

Well-Known Member
Oct 22, 2011
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Bangor, Maine
Hello Jude and welcome to the forum!
what kind of bikes are most compatible
My experience, 8 years 20+ builds will be to say the 26" beach cruiser / w-coaster brake style bikes (think HUFFY) are the most kit compatible. Cranbrook, SantaFe, and Causeway Huffy models. Look for a bike with the biggest wheel spokes. (12gauge minimum size)

What kind of tools do I need?
Metric and Standard socket set, Metric and Standard open end wrenches, Metric Allen Wrench set, Phillips and Flat screwdrivers and an assortment of pliars.
where can I find good accessories for my bike like headlights, a speedometer, and brakes.
Amazon has every type of bicycle accesories you need. Although more expensive - Buy Local and support your nearest shop. At least visit...
Is it possible for me to get hand brakes on a motorized bike?

Assuming you buy a bike with a coaster brake rear you will NEED front AND rear brakes to be safe. somthing like this.
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00LOZ9WHC/
why are people saying to get rid of fenders all together

The problem is the tab attachments which hold the fenders to the bike are a very thin piece of metal. Under vibration these tabs DO break. In the front, If ignored/not noticed eventually will cause other attachment point failures. Fender braces which attach to the fork, there are two one on each side... same thin metal will also fail. This failure will cause the fender to fall atop the tire, rotate around and act as a ski UNDER the front wheel. Typically this happens so quickly You will not realize until you are seriously hurt. Many horror stories of this happening with pictures on this forum. If you run with Fenders you MUST re-enforce them with heavier metal. Hardware store item (L-Brackets) or if you weld see my safe fender Album here
https://motorbicycling.com/media/albums/safe-fenders.1277/
Also; if you choose to The polycarbonate fenders are lightweight and have thicker Stainless Steel mounting tabs.
https://www.amazon.com/Planet-Bike-...id=1568540902&sourceid=Mozilla-search&sr=8-27
threads, videos the most accurate and not based on any bias opinions covering a topic similar to mine, it'd be greatly appreciated!

You must become familiar with the search feature right here on this forum. Really a treasure trove of knowledge and info which includes thousands of pics and vids / vid links.
Best of luck to you!
 
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Jimmy Bloodmaker

Active Member
Nov 24, 2018
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midwest
i use thin plastic fenders. they fall off easy when struck hard and just crumble up. they do hold back the mud and water and put up with a beating, but will fail eventually. so by using the cheap thin plastic, at worst i have a chewed up tire. i've destroyed a few sets, never once going down. instead i would turn around and collect my now garbage fender. my trash, my responsibility to pick it up.
 

Jimmy Bloodmaker

Active Member
Nov 24, 2018
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midwest
yes sir, exactly like tht. tough enough for a year, then replace. they block the mud and water well enough, but just destroy themselves if sent through a tire. they are cheap to boot. i've lost them at many different speeds on most surfaces. only in snow was i scared, still never went down though. almost, but i got my balance right before i would have lost my teeth. lol. these bikes will mess ya up something fierce. i just do like i do with dirt bikes, cheap plastic. won't wreck my rims and wont eat my tire nearly as fast as a metal fender, and won't trap me if i get caught on it and it bends.
 
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JudeTheRandomDude

New Member
Sep 14, 2019
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Yup, Ive used plastic DVD cases to make mud flaps. You mean somthing like these Jimmy?
https://www.amazon.com/Juvale-Bike-...XPC/ref=sr_1_12?keywords=bicycle+fenders&link
I was thinking about getting this Hyper 26" Beach Cruiser for my 2 stroke engine, will this do?
https://www.walmart.com/ip/Hyper-26-Men-s-Beach-Cruiser-Bike/299035532
Can you be more specific or send me a direct link/example of what tools I would need because this is my first time doing anything engineering related and it's REALLY intimidating for a noob like me. Now.. I searched up the tools you said that I would need and I'm finding MULTIPLE results/different variations and I'm worried that I might buy the wrong thing and have to end up returning it and all that, and it just seems like a hassle.
Also just to verify, dual hand brake (a two in one brake on one handle bar) will be strong/reliable enough for me to use for a motorized bike?
Also are there any vintage speedometers that have use mph instead of kh/m?
 

Jimmy Bloodmaker

Active Member
Nov 24, 2018
176
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28
midwest
I was thinking about getting this Hyper 26" Beach Cruiser for my 2 stroke engine, will this do?
https://www.walmart.com/ip/Hyper-26-Men-s-Beach-Cruiser-Bike/299035532
Can you be more specific or send me a direct link/example of what tools I would need because this is my first time doing anything engineering related and it's REALLY intimidating for a noob like me. Now.. I searched up the tools you said that I would need and I'm finding MULTIPLE results/different variations and I'm worried that I might buy the wrong thing and have to end up returning it and all that, and it just seems like a hassle.
Also just to verify, dual hand brake (a two in one brake on one handle bar) will be strong/reliable enough for me to use for a motorized bike?
Also are there any vintage speedometers that have use mph instead of kh/m?
it should fit tht bike. it's pretty cool looking too. i'd stay away from duel hand brakes unless you are absolutly certian you will not be taking the bike on loose surfaces. duel brake can get ya hurt. i control both my brakes and clutch and can do all three at once, safer and faster than a duel brake.

to install, two 10mm wrenches ( trust me), i think it's an 8mm, 5mm, and 3mm allen ( balled end really helps), a tiny drill bit ( forgot the size), a 14mm wrench, phillips and flat head screw drivers, a chain breaker or a punch and a hammer. if using the stock tensioner ( really should get a spring loaded, less drag and more efficient tensioning). i use spring loaded, or if needed weld the stock one in place. if doing a port job, you're gonna need a dremel or dentist drill, or a couple of fine small files.
 

JudeTheRandomDude

New Member
Sep 14, 2019
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What's an example of a loose surface? and what do you mean by you control your brakes and clutch doing all three in one? and could you also explain why I would need two 10mm wrenches and instead of one? I'm sorry I'm really new to this and I'm sorta unfamiliar with some of the things you are listing in the last part. Is there a picture or a video that could help me get more familiar with the anatomy of a bike and the 2 stroke engine and it's parts?
 

FOG

Well-Known Member
Mar 3, 2019
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A loose surface would typically be anything other than asphalt or concrete. Dirt, gravel, mud, snow, ice. Think slippery like I might fall down?

You would need 2 10mm wrenches to hold a 10mm bolt on one side and a 10mm nut on the other. Happens all the time.

I've no experience with the 3 in 1 lever concept but JimmyB has a ton. I'd be listening if I were you.

Other than that you just gotta jump in there and try. You'll make mistakes. Wreck parts. Bust your knuckles. Get frustrated. Waste money! I do all the above on a routine basis!

But that's how you learn. Being afraid to try never got anything done.
 

JudeTheRandomDude

New Member
Sep 14, 2019
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A loose surface would typically be anything other than asphalt or concrete. Dirt, gravel, mud, snow, ice. Think slippery like I might fall down?

You would need 2 10mm wrenches to hold a 10mm bolt on one side and a 10mm nut on the other. Happens all the time.

I've no experience with the 3 in 1 lever concept but JimmyB has a ton. I'd be listening if I were you.

Other than that you just gotta jump in there and try. You'll make mistakes. Wreck parts. Bust your knuckles. Get frustrated. Waste money! I do all the above on a routine basis!

But that's how you learn. Being afraid to try never got anything done.
Where can I get this 3 in one clutch/brake you speak of? Winter is coming soon and I was wondering if I'd be able to ride in snow/rain
whats the maximum limit of inches a motorized bike can go through snow-wise, is it too rrisky? is there any way I could make it as safe as possible for me and the bike to be able to ride in the snow?
Also I was wondering if I could catch a Septa bus in philly ( they have bike rakes in front of the bus ) and put my bike on the bike rake... would the vibration and shaking from the bus mess up anything?
Thanks!!