Whizzer Speed Modifications

After several requests to share my test results on this site, I will supply several articles for everyone's enjoyment. First I must state that some of these modifications might violate EPA or Dot rules, having said that here goes.
If your Whizzer is the WC-1 [1999 to early 2004] motor, it is best to leave it alone, because if you over heat it [power=heat] there is a 99% chance the valve seats will loosen [not good]. If you have the earlier WC-1 motor, contact the nearest Whizzer dealer [or me] to upgrade your motor with the NE cylinder kit. All comments concerning the Whizzer motor will be based around the NE motor [and the new SE motor]. When Whizzer first released the NE motor it became clear rather quickly that the motor produced way too much power to qualify as a moped in many states. Whizzer changed the cylinder & carburetor after the first several hundred motors produced, and retro-fitted all the motors in stock. The new motor sported a 22MM carburetor, a restrictor plate, and a re-designed head in an effort to slow it down. I then purchased the remaining stock of 26MM carburetors, and the majority of the early NE cylinders as the base for my modified motors. Because of the earlier cylinder design I was able to produce enough power to set and hold a "bunch" of speed records, including almost 70 MPH on a dyno, and both "modified & stock appearing" at last years "Dirt Drags" at Dawson Springs, KY.
I will supply the information needed to extract extra power from the Whizzer motor, and these changes can be done in stages, from a little extra power to the Mach 5 version [able to climb the side of a building, just kidding, but really strong]. First I will cover the easy changes, and start with the restrictor plate spacer, DO NOT DISCARD the spacer, because it is needed to help keep the carburetor cool [to avoid boiling the gas in the float bowl], simply open the hole in the restrictor to match the intake port I.D. [approx 18 MM]. Next remove the exhaust manifold and use a Dremel grinder with a sanding drum to remove the casting extrusions at the top of the cylinder exhaust port [be sure to cover the flywheel with a cloth to avoid the metal shavings from attaching to the flywheel magnets]. Replace the muffler insert with the hi-flow version [$20.00]. Please note Whizzer copied my muffler design, but made several versions, some great and some not so great. If the holes match the center pipe, and are cut flush with the ends , don't change it. If the holes are the same size as the center pipe but extend past the end plates, simply cut the extended pipe flush with the end plates. If it is any other design [hole smaller than the center pipe] or earlier WC-1 version, simply replace it. After these minor changes your Whizzer should easily cruise at 45 MPH on level ground.
Are you over weight or live in a "hilly" area, then more power is needed. The next modifications will require removing the head, altering the head bolts, and the use of a copper head gasket. Have the head milled at least .060" [don't exceed .080"], remove all washers from the 8MM head bolts [including the thin washer affixed to the bolt] and use only the thick flat washer. The head bolts will need to be shortened 3/16" or they will bottom out in the cylinder bolt holes. Install copper head gasket and torque the 8MM bolt to 180 INCH pounds, and the 10MM bolts to 210 INCH pounds [not foot pounds!]. If you don't have a inch pound torque wrench but have a foot pound version simply divide by 12, example 210 divided by 12 = 17.5 foot pounds.
If more power is needed, then the cylinder must be modified. this is where the "boys are seperated from the men", and unless you have a lot of talent, a mill, and a lathe it is best to have others do the work. The early NE cylinder is different in several ways as compared to the current production cylinder, and is much easier to modify. The early NE cylinder doesn't have a sleeve in the intake port, the intake port is shorter and at a different angle, and the exhaust port is shaped differently. I will explain the total process of modifying the early NE cylinder if you want to attempt it [whoops, where are you going to find an early NE cylinder!]. First open the intake with a 1" mill, obtain 1" aluminum PIPE [not tubing], because the pipe is larger than 1" [1.030"] and already has the desired 20.8mm I.D.. Reduce the pipe O.D. [-.002"] to fit the I.D. of the intake port. Press the intake sleeve into the port using loctite #620 sleeve retainer. Cut [grind] the sleeve flush with the intake port flange. Next deck the top of the cylinder, to remove any tool marks caused by the mill when made, and to make sure the surface is completely flat. Next re-cut the valve seats with a NewWay valve cutting tool. Next lap the valves into the seats, and liquid test to make sure there aren't any leaks. Install progressive valve springs. Shim the valve springs to increase valve seat pressure. Install oil vent system [a special aluminum tube designed to direct the oil flow] to help at higher RPMs. Round the top of the exhaust port. Either match the intake port to fit the needed spacers or make a special tapered adapter to match either the 22Mm or 26MM carburetor. Paint the cylinder with black cylinder paint [flat is better] to keep the heat down. Advance the camshaft one tooth. Install special Modified mushroom lifters, set the intake tappet clearance to .006" and the exhaust to .008". Motor should cruise at approx 55 MPH [depending on weight] on level ground. If the need is to travel faster, then a closer look at the combustion chamber is in order. Be very careful when considering alternate heads, because many aftermarket options are of very poor quality, over priced, and some even reduce the power instead of increasing it. The current NE head can be milled and re-worked [for far less than an expensive aftermarket version]. I am currently testing several heads for Whizzer, and it looks like there may be a really nice head available in the near future for a resonable price.
I am in the process of aquiring a "lmited" quanity of special Hi-lift camshafts [less than 12] for the earlier WC-1 motors [to be used with the NE cylinder kit] and according to test resuls will almost double the power output.
I only have a couple of the special modified early NE cylinders in stock [sells for less than a new stock NE cylinder], and they may be the last available if I can't locate more to modify. And I have one special WSE [WSE000022] motor in stock [really, really, hot]and includes the carburetor.
Hope this information is helpful, and if more information or prices is needed just contact me.
Quenton
 
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flyboy605

New Member
May 14, 2008
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HI Again Quenton
In answer to your questions;My engine idles well compression is good it has two long bolts that go through the head to the case, it runs very rough when you try to accelerate, the plug is black with fine soot, I believe it is running rich, I have a 76 main jet I have had the clip in every slot, it had 10 miles whin I bought it I very thouroughly cleaned the carb, changed the main jet to a 78 I think that is what it came with, I now have about 50 miles but has never ran well. I have not noticed getting it getting hot, like I said it has me puzzled, I have been working on small engines for many years I had a whizzer about 60 years ago, I am now 70 and would like to enjoy my bike,Please help, I cant imagine a "new" bike that wont run, also im at 5000 ft. Thanks a bunch
 
Remove the side cover, use a real good screwdriver or impact wrench. The camshaft will stay in cover. Remove the camshaft from the side cover [you can use a couple of large screwdrivers to pry the camshaft & bearing from the cover]. Install camshaft back into motor one tooth advanced [turn camshaft gear counterclockwise one tooth]. Install cover. It should run better, but you may need to lower the main jet to a 74 or 76. if it still runs poor, you might want to check the lifter clearance, factory settings are .012", but a little closer on the intake lifter wouldn't hurt [.010"].
The long studs should be removed because they can warp the head or cause it to leak. There is a small bolt kit available to replace the studs.

That should help, let me know.........

Have fun,
Whizzer OuterBanks
Quenton
 
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flyboy605

New Member
May 14, 2008
17
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HI Quention
Thanks for the info, I will try your ideas, if I decide to order your kit, do you accept credit cards, how do I order, and what is your time frame?
Do you have the 74jets. and the bolt kit.
If I cannot get to run per your instructions I will probably order your parts in a couple of days, I will keep you up to date Thanks Paul
 

flyboy605

New Member
May 14, 2008
17
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One more thing, I would like to order the smaller main jet, let me know how we need to do that thanks paul
 

ws50599

New Member
Sep 30, 2008
15
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what does the new Ambassador motor called the NE5? And will your modifications here work on that one?
 

flyboy605

New Member
May 14, 2008
17
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0
HI
Im not sure what the NE5 is, I replaced the following items, head and cylinder,carb, muffler, camshaft,lifters, it made a huge difference!! I still dont have the carb adjusted, that has been the only negative item Good luck
 
The early edition Ambassador motor was an unrestricted NE motor with a milled head. The later version uses a different crankshaft setup and a different flywheel, and therefore less parts are interchangeable with earlier motors. The early Ambassadors used an automatic clutch, whereas the later model has a CVT system. Just remember the Ambassador is heavy, and any well tuned NE model will run off and hide from the Ambassador. The biggest advantage of the Ambassador is the ride, and better stopping power. The bike is very, very long which also adds to a smoother ride, but is harder to handle at lower speeds than the earlier NE5 model. It is possible to make a lot of modifications to the motor, but chances are, the top speed will remain below 50 MPH [with a tail wind and a down hill grade]. Maybe spending another $1200.00 to convert to Fred's OHV system [PBS Engineering] might be the best answer for this heavy weight.

Have fun,
Quenton