What's the best drive roller?

SpiderSpartan

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Jul 29, 2008
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I'm thinking about making a second bike that's a friction drive. What do you guys recommend for drive rollers? I know I've seen bike pegs recommended, but does anyone use anything else? Also, what's the best way to attach them to the drive shaft? Welding or can anyone recommend some way to attach it without welding? Thanks guys.
 

deacon

minor bike philosopher
Jan 15, 2008
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Okay
most engines I have come across have a threaded drive shaft. Probably not all but weed eaters and chainsaws seem to. If you have a threaded drive shaft, I would get my roller to either bolt on to the drive shaft or I would have a nut welded onto the roller. That way you can change the roller if you decide you want something else.

Best I can tell the bike peg will match up to a bike with a 3/8 fine thread shaft. and then only if your ped is for a bmx not mtb as the threads are different. A lot of the weedeater have 5/16 thread.

Lately I have been making my drive rollers from a 3/4 in pipe nipple with an endcap attached to the motor, then just tighten the pipe nipple into the end cap. If you drill the end cap it has to be dead center.

That's how I do it, others probably do it differently.
 

comfortableshoes

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Jul 22, 2008
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get yourself a 24 threaded knurled bmx peg- they come in a bunch of sizes and are easy on and off.

They look like they will shred your tire but it's no worse than anything else. I've got 2 a stainless steel peg and a aluminum alloy. I like the aluminum one because it fits right :) so I use it the most. I'm surprised at how little damage it's done to the tire. If anything the tire has done more to wear down the peg than anything else.

I used a piece of drive shaft from the craftsman weedwacker and that thing actually worked well. I tried it smooth and it was okay and then I cut grooves into it and it worked really well. That was also some sort of aluminum alloy.
 

deacon

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Jan 15, 2008
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I think the peg will only fit weedeater that had clutches. The adapter ones i have had were all 5/16 threads.
 

SpiderSpartan

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Jul 29, 2008
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I think the peg will only fit weedeater that had clutches. The adapter ones i have had were all 5/16 threads.
yeah, I just measured mine tonight and it's 5/16-24 threaded. I remember back when I was younger some friends of mine played those table top RPGs and they had this metal bonding glue. I think I'll go to the hardware store and see what they can tell me about that. If I could use that to attach a nut to the peg I think that would be good.

ComfortableShoes - could you take a look at these. Are those the kind of pegs you're talking about? It looks like those really would shred some rubber.
 
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comfortableshoes

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Jul 22, 2008
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You can always drill them out and then tap them tot he right size....

the pegs I have are these:
Pegs-Knurled Alloy - Pr. SLVR - Choppers U.S., LLC
I should point out that I think that the divot in the center slips a bit- nothing a little jbweld and sand won't fix. I'll get to that this weekend- suposed to rain all weekend here. :(

And I bought a set of these in a larger size:
The Hottest Mountain Bike Parts, Accessories & Clothing at Discount Prices @ BlueSkyCycling.com

Though I really like the look of the one that you linked to- it looks like a grater! BUT the knurls on the others also look like they would tear rubber up and they don't, fine particles but the tire doesn't look that worn... Tires are cheap- For $10 or so I can replace.
 
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SpiderSpartan

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Jul 29, 2008
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I bid on a couple of 1" pegs on ebay. $7 with shipping and handling(Fingers crossed). I need a tap for my original bike project, so I'll go pick that up today. Thanks for all the feedback guys.
 

deacon

minor bike philosopher
Jan 15, 2008
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If you want to attach a nut to the end of the peg, you will need to have it welded. Nothing else will hold that I have tried and I tried about everything.
 

SpiderSpartan

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Jul 29, 2008
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Have you tried any epoxy? I know that stuff is pretty heavy duty. I figure I'll attach it to the inside of the peg. That way even if it doesn't hold, the worst thing that happens is the peg stops spinning the wheel.
 

comfortableshoes

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Jul 22, 2008
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When the peg stops spinning the tire- the force of the tire will pull it off the shaft and toss it to the ground, where it will stop dead, it's weird when it does it. you expect it to be somewhere hard to get to but usually they are right in the middle where you were at.
 

Dan

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May 25, 2008
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I have been thunking about rollers. Lenny posted this; Studded Tires- BikeTiresDirect.com Snow tires for bikes I am wondering how much these would enhance the friction of a friction drive. Not all that expensive.
Thanks Lenny. I was wondering how to DIY snow tires. I live in CT and ride most all of the winter
 

comfortableshoes

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Jul 22, 2008
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I have been thunking about rollers. Lenny posted this; Studded Tires- BikeTiresDirect.com Snow tires for bikes I am wondering how much these would enhance the friction of a friction drive. Not all that expensive.
Thanks Lenny. I was wondering how to DIY snow tires. I live in CT and ride most all of the winter

Check out some mountain bike forums. There should be some studded tire howtos there. A good friend of mine used to ride all winter long up in maine when we were in school. He used to DIY snow and ice tires. He used some sort of short hardened steel screw, he then got tubes of silicone from home cheapo and slathered that in, put in a layer of old tube. The metal stuck out only about 1/8th inch or so, but he said once he did it he never slipped on ice ever, said he coiuldn't even when he tried.

I don't think studs would work on a friction drive though... Unless your using a rubber type roller. And even then I think it ould cause more issues than worth. You could try it on the front tire and leave the rear tire alone...

I think the big issue is that all the studded bike tires I've seen have VERY aggresive treads for mountain biking- something like the old tioga psychos I used to ride on- toothy rough tires- things that friction drives HATE. I've got cheapo tires on my mountian bike now and the friction drive hates them. On my MadWagon I've got smooth tires. The smooth street tires run way better.
 

comfortableshoes

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Jul 22, 2008
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Last night I mixed up some JB Weld and sand. I';m sure I was slipping alot on my pegs that have the divots in the center for wher ethe wrench holds on to put the pegs onto a bike. I filled those divots and textured the mix with a plastic fork.

We have a hold on the rain here and I took it out for a test spin- just down the block but man, what a difference it makes. Let me tell you- there is no more slip. I picked up another MPH on a flat with no pedaling. (Pedal to start and then drop the engine and go, no pedal only gas.) Last night I was cruising at 12mph on flats w/ NP (no pedal) this AM 13 and on a few occasions 14.

If the rain holds out a little longer I'll take a cruise down the long flat stretch and see what happens.
 

deacon

minor bike philosopher
Jan 15, 2008
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My neighbor works in a furniture factory so He picked me up an industrial sanding belt. He suggested that I attach it with gorilla glue. It is going to cure over night then I'm going to give it a try.

My experience with jb and sand is that it is great stuff but lasts just a couple of days. If yours lasts better I will have to get your recipe.
 

comfortableshoes

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Jul 22, 2008
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I just got back from a ride- filling in the divots gave me a new top, no pedal speed on flats of 15mph, an easy comfortable cruise. From the low end I now can bump it going at 3 strokes of the pedals. Hills were better managed. Seems those divots were slipping a lot more than I expected.

I will see how they hold up to some more testing tomorrow, I'd like to see how it holds up after 5, 10, 15 and 20 miles, They skies have unleashed a torrent of wet s4!t on us and I just barely made it to my garage before the downpour.

I've got to say that 15 mph is just about right I think for cruising about town. I keep up with traffic but cagers seem bewildered by the smoke and the bike is just about right for it. I can sit quite upright and control the handlebars with one hand. I'm thinking a set of upright ape hangers would be perfectly suited to this bike.
 

deacon

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Jan 15, 2008
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The twenty inch bike I bought has those very tall bars not quite ape hangers but tall. I might switch them to the chainsaw bike. I'm not sure just yet.
 

deacon

minor bike philosopher
Jan 15, 2008
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this is NOT my idea I lifted from some other post. The neighbor gave me an industrial sanding belt. I have no idea if the regular ones are the same or not but this one has a thick cloth (it seems) back. I cut it to the right width and made it about an inch longer than the wheel is round.

Neighbor suggested gorilla glue to attach it to my pipe nipple, so I decided to try it. Yes it is expensive but hey what the heck. It is a learning adventure.

I glued it on following the directions and held it in place over night with some inner tube bands. I rode the bike about ten miles today and you can't tell it has ever turned. I don't know if it will hold up but man it really is a good wheel for now. Good friction and doesn't seem to be too rough on the tire but I really can't tell since It is an old tire anyway.
 

deacon

minor bike philosopher
Jan 15, 2008
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Dont anybody rush out and buy this stuff yet. It wore my tire down the case in a day. I'm not sure how much was there to begin with but It was a fairly new tire. I need to do some more testing with this thing.

Since it also had a peg with a grinder surface it might not have had much left anyway. I'm Going to change it out for something else tomorrow and give it a shot.
 

comfortableshoes

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Jul 22, 2008
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So I only filled the divots on this roller with the JB Weld and sand but it's made a huge difference.

The roller used to slip on those divots but it doesn't slip at all any more.

I put it on fairly lumpy. Please also note that the whole roller does not contact teh tire, only the first 2 inches of it, the whole thing is about 3 inches wide.

The first pic is of starting out today- I had put about 3 miles on it the other day.

The next pic is at about the 5 mile mark (8 miles total), again no major wear, some rounding over of the major high points, but nothing major.

Final pic is at home at the 10 mile (13 miles total) point today again same slight wearing at high points, but nothing major, none of the JB weld has come off.

I'm not seeing any major wear ont eh tire- nothing that the peg wouldn't have done on it's own. I will update as I put more miles on this thing.

I noticed that at the industrial park there was a chunk of old industrial sanding belt on the ground. I'll go check it out later and see if I can snag it. I'm going to wait until everything down i there closes for the day.

I feel pretty comfortable in calling the JB Weld and sand a winner.

My method:
Use standard set JB Weld.
Mix a lot of it
Mix in sand until you get a tick goopy playdoh like paste
Trowel it on with a plastic fork.
score the stuff with the fork to give it some horizontal grooves.

Let set over night

then ride ^5
 

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comfortableshoes

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Jul 22, 2008
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Okay I went out and did another 7.25 miles on the thing. My arms are toast and I'm pretty sure my arse is going to hurt tomorrow. I may head over to Richards (d!cks) Sporting Goods tomorrow and pick up that shock absorbing seat post and a gel seat. Let me tell you I hit a few bumps and I could feel that seat in my throat, if you know what I mean.

I did a short 2 mile ride and took a pic- I figured it was at the 15 mile mark for the roller and still no wear on the roller, tire looks a little worn, but Ilike I said for good contact and good speedI will take that any day over slipping of teh spindle.

Next pic is at the end of the 7.25 miles I did. It would be the 20.5 mile mark for the spindle and again, I'm noticing not much in the way of wear.

I hereby declare jb weld and fine play sand to be the sh!t to use if one is looking for something to cover a less than adequate spindle. I'll get more pics when I hit the 50 mile mark.
 

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