What do you think? Shift kit or new sprocket?

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by NerpAngel, Feb 7, 2010.

  1. NerpAngel

    NerpAngel New Member

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    Why would I want aftermarket Chainrings?.... haha
     
  2. Humsuckler

    Humsuckler New Member

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    because, that guy makes them out of aircraft grade aluminum, in any color. totally custom ;)

    AAAAND.... you can change your gear ratio
     
  3. john_the_great

    john_the_great New Member

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    The only problem I had with the shift kit is Imma kid and I am kinda hard on stuff.... so I ended up destroying a nexus 3 speed hub and then another derailer.... bicycle parts.... I ended up bending the back plate, the all-thread adjuster(eventually upgraded to 3/4 all-thread), and tweaking the free-wheel. Its real cool cuz you can hot rod around real fast but... no matter how well built the jack shaft kit is built its not gonna be as sturdy as a single speed.
     
  4. NerpAngel

    NerpAngel New Member

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    U managed to break it? Holy smokes!
     
  5. Techbiker

    Techbiker New Member

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    If you do choose to go with Andy's stuff, I will vouch for it. I have been using his top hat adapter and custom 40 tooth sprocket for 150 miles and both are very light and durable. I have never had my chain jump off of the sprocket even though my engine is not perfectly lined up with the rear sprocket. I'd like to get a shift kit, but I'm probably going to just put the money into a more reliable 4-stroke kit.
     
  6. Maxvision

    Maxvision New Member

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    Yea, what he said. Bump start not possible. Once motor is warmed up a quick pedal start is no problem. However, I still have to stand up on my pedal to get the motor to "kick over". My motor usually dies on me cause I forget to pull the clutch in at stop lights and stop signs...lol...

    For long downhill coasts on a bike without a shift kit it's suggested that you pull in the clutch. With a shift kit this isn't necessary. Neither is it necessary to pull in the clutch to change gears, just back off the throttle a bit. Sometimes I forget that a clutch is necessary at all...thus...the motor dying at stop signs.
     
  7. LincolnMercury

    LincolnMercury New Member

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    I own both... and commute 32 miles each day, round trip. I have a 32 tooth rear sprocket (from BGF, $19.95); top speed is 38mph on both with Jet Stealth 80cc engines. The shift kit, in stop and go traffic, is the best. It's a little more "fiddlely" (more complex, more adjustments), but I can do the whole commute with out peddling. The small 32 tooth sprocket requires peddling to start and anytime I slow below 8-10 mph, but only for a bit. I have found myself gravitating to "sprocket bike" because of the simplicity. On the weekends, I ride the shifter bike. I have not played with the 8-speed ratio's on the shifter bike yet, to optimize the ride. In low gear, the bike speed is under 8mph @ wot... I do not have a need for that much torque (not too many hills in the panhandle of Florida).
    Sooo... bang for the buck: low tooth count sprocket. Added bonus, simple setup, less to worry about. But for "performance riding, hill climbing, or just out right FUN!": shifter kit!
     

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  8. Sign Guy

    Sign Guy New Member

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    Lincoln Merc,

    Those are some pretty nice big...........ahhhhhh..... saddlebags you got on that bike - (^)

    Since you have basically the same set up (engines) on 2 different bikes, you've provided the best info yet on the comparison of the regular sprocket and shift kit I've read yet. It really helps me out since my commute is about 20-22 miles RT depending on the roads I take and for me it's about 95% uphill to and the reverse coming home. Sounds like the shift is what I'll move to next after I get a few more hundred miles on the thing. Thanks for the review!
    .reddd
     
  9. Ghost0

    Ghost0 New Member

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    Brian,
    If you want to test ride one let me or Pablo know. We can arrange something. I'm in Bellingham and Pablo is in Duvall. I drive to Pablo's about 2 time a month so I make it as far as the highway 2 exit. I may even be able to stop by sometime for a demo.
     
  10. LincolnMercury

    LincolnMercury New Member

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    Sign Guy,

    My girlfriend complains the no one notices her when i am on my bike... however in the real world the opposite is true.
    The best thing about the shifter kit is SBP, ghost and pablo. these guys are the real deal. Emails are answered promptly and questions, no matter how trivial are answered completely. The kit itself is well manufactured and well packed. The installation instructions are complete and illustrated. I added the chain tensioner and opted for the optional removable clutch cover. Dremel is my friend. Use a quality chain... $9.99 walmart chains will break and leave you stranded if you do not have extra links and a chain tool. Lock tite EVERYTHING! And don't forget the little angle bracket that attaches the seatpost mount to the jackshaft plate.
    I think I am going for a ride now... on the shifter bike!
     
  11. ChipMan

    ChipMan New Member

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    Well, that's good to hear that there is options for the 32 spoke wheels, as I found I overlooked that detail when I bought my motor.

    Does anyone have a way to put me in contact with Jim, or how I can go about getting one of these adapters for myself? Thanks in advance.

    EDIT: Ah, never mind that. I spent a little more time looking around, and I found Jim.
     
    #31 ChipMan, Mar 14, 2010
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2010
  12. Fabian

    Fabian New Member

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    I've now done over 5000 kilometers on my bike.

    I tried it with the single speed drive system that comes with the bicycle engine kit and quickly found it to be a waste of time.

    After much searching on the net; knowing that there must be a better way, i came across SickBikeParts and their Shift Kit mechanism.

    In an instant, i pulled out the credit card and within 7 days, it was delivered to my door in Melbourne (Australia).

    I can't emphasise enough, that everybody should be purchasing a Shift Kit, if you're going to do things properly.

    Fabian
     
  13. Humsuckler

    Humsuckler New Member

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    this round im buying a shiftkit for sure. i can only imagine the stress it takes off the little motor!
     
  14. NerpAngel

    NerpAngel New Member

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    "asdgisadnfnpcbiasmtoasfbnmdsfhpo'

    That's what my brain is thinking right now.

    I don't know if I want the shift kit or the adapter! :D hmmmmmmmm
     
  15. Fabian

    Fabian New Member

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    Oh yes, one word of advise, if you so choose to take it.

    Get the "Deluxe" shift kit because it comes with all the tools and a few nice options.

    If you bought all the extra bits individually, it works out more expensive, also, buy the optional dished 30 tooth chainwheel sprocket (or the 24 tooth chainwheel sprocket if you are towing a heavy trailer) and get the 9 tooth jackshaft sprocket.
    This combination gives you an effective low range chainwheel gear combined with a high range chainwheel gear - if there is enough space to keep your front derailleur, you'll be able to shift chainwheel gears on the move, otherwise it's a manual process, but it's not a big deal.

    The hill climbing power is just amazing with a 9T jackshaft sprocket and the 30T chainwheel sprocket and a 34 or 36 tooth 1st gear on the rear wheel cassette.

    With the optional 24T chainwheel, you'll be able to climb vertical inclines towing 50 kilos (110 lbs) behind you.

    At the end of the day, it's not about going down the road at ridiculous speeds, but more about getting up and over hills, regardless of how steep they may be, without straining your guts out - let the engine do the work.

    Fabian
     
  16. NerpAngel

    NerpAngel New Member

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    I'm looking for speed and keeping up with traffic. No towing or heavy duty pullin' :p I'm only 135lbs lol

    thanks for the info though
     
  17. NerpAngel

    NerpAngel New Member

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    Sorry for the double post!

    I'm going with a shift kit! No offense but I haven't heard from Jimmy in like forever and I want to get ridin'!!!! Will post pics and videos of my baby soon :D
     
  18. rockhopper

    rockhopper New Member

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    I'm still torn on this subject. Look forward to hearing your opinion.
     
  19. psprat496

    psprat496 New Member

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    Keep us updated. I want to see how your bike comes out. And it is a good choice going with the shift kit. I haven't looked into it too much but unfortunately I don't think my bike would work with it.
     
  20. twowheeledfox

    twowheeledfox New Member

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    Just rode a buddy's fully-built, fully lighted shifter build today and it's excellent.

    Shiftkit, Shiftkit shiftkit! These little things become small, usable motorbikes with actual gears on them, better than mopeds that cost far more, and still are cheap in the long run, easy to fix etc. And the shifter is fun to ride! Feels like riding a Honda Cub as you shift, and even these little Chinese motors can sing without buying mods. Singlespeed was abandoned in the early days of motorbike/cycling because there is just no way to combine acceleration and top speed with a one-speed setup, and with these little motors you need all the efficiency you can get- think of it as a $300 (+ bike and lights, mirrors etc) motorbike that saves in the long run due to lack of titling, registering, insurance, etc.
     

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