Well there it is - built!

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by Antony, Oct 13, 2008.

  1. Antony

    Antony New Member

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    Decided to opt out of trying to work out which parts of my brain can't see what is probably obvious to an engineer, so taking my built bicycle to a motorbike place for finishing. What I will be asking is:-

    Why does this clutch control have three settings and yet the clutch seems to be permanently engaged?

    There is no travel on the throttle. Is it done right?

    The chain guard thinks it's a machete. Further thoughts on how to make it act just as a guard?

    I've put in a mixture of 16:1 as recommended by the Chinese, yet the bally thing still won't start. Why?

    Will I be legal riding this thing, even though I've asked the police and they don't know either.

    That should be a question for any Brits on here. Insurance too. What are your experiences please?

    As an aside, and as this seems to be predominantly an American forum, can you please tell us who was on the grassy knoll?

    Antony.
     
  2. Bikeguy Joe

    Bikeguy Joe Godfather of Motorized Bicycles

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    Can help you with the grassy knoll, I was only 2 at the time, so I am pretty sure it wasn't me or my little brother.
     
  3. TwoWalks

    TwoWalks New Member

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    We could tell you, but then we would have to kill you!!rotfl
     
  4. Bikeguy Joe

    Bikeguy Joe Godfather of Motorized Bicycles

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    As for the throttle- if it doesn't move, do you think that's right? Of course not.
    I don't use the chain gard, and some kits don't come with them.

    If the clutch is permanently engaged, the cable isn't intalled or adjusted correctly.
     
  5. MrLarkins

    MrLarkins HS Math Teacher

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    no chain guard here
     
  6. Nitrohorse

    Nitrohorse New Member

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    Don't worry about the police in England, they're not allowed to carry sidearms.
    I'm not sure you should be riding a motorized bike if you can't assemble it by yourself. You might hurt yourself....
     
  7. deacon

    deacon minor bike philosopher

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    I had a heck of time getting mine together and i think I can ride it pretty safely after a year.

    When you pull the clutch lever it should move the clutch arm. If it doesn't you might need to adjust the cable.

    The throttle is important to get right. I didn't and seized my engine. Did you know you could adjust the throttle cable with the nut on top of the carb. The thing that looks like buddist temple. And the end of the cable sheath should be inserted into that thing as well. The throttle control won't move near as much as you probably think it should. I rung mine off trying to squeeze a little more out of it. Cheap plastic you know.

    I wasn't on the grassy knoll but I'm pretty sure it wasn't a man with a gun. I think it was an umbrella, he might have been brit.
     
  8. Nitrohorse

    Nitrohorse New Member

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    There's a reason you had a heck of a time getting it together.

    I'm very selective on what I ride and who had their hands in building it.
    I've seen the gambit on here from well engineered bikes to cobbled pieces of junk.
    My unwavering belief is that if you can't assemble the kit correctly and re-engineer parts to make them work properly, you probably shouldn't be riding your finished product.
    If I couldn't figure out how to make the throttle work, I'm man enough and mature enough to know that I shouldn't be riding the bike for my own safety.
    If you can't get the simple things right, how are you going to fare with the more difficult aspects? I place a premium on my safety.
    I raced drag bikes in my younger days. There was no room for error or learning to get it right. I guess that carried me through life.
    Know your limitations or live to regret them.
     
  9. Antony

    Antony New Member

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    Blimey Nitrohorse. You make sense. I'm disabled and travel by mobility scooter, but these things are limited in range. The idea was for greater mobility, but in truth the problems have soured things a good bit.

    My son has suggested I fit the engine to the scooter instead, but I'll pass on that idea.

    Antony
     
  10. Nitrohorse

    Nitrohorse New Member

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    Antony,
    I think you fit my perception of a smart man! Is there a local bike shop that can go over the bike for you? Let them make sure your bike is complete and safe before you take to the streets. I truly understand your wish for mobility. I had an uncle who had MD and he struggled each day with it. I wish I lived closer to you, I'd certainly lend a hand...
    Good luck with your build.
     

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