shorten a 415 chain?!!?!?

Discussion in 'Hubs, Gearboxes, Sprockets and Chains' started by BiotinX, May 27, 2017.

  1. BiotinX

    BiotinX New Member

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    I'm trying to remove the excess links from the 415 chain included with my 2 stroke engine kit. I used my grinder to grind down the head of the pin that I need to remove. I have beat the **** out of the stupid thing trying to get the pin to come out but it won't budge! Soaked it in penetrating oil didn't help to loosen it either.

    What am I doing wrong? I really don't want to buy a chain break that I'll use one time.

    Thanks!
     
  2. crassius

    crassius Well-Known Member

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    you typed "pin" and I'm hoping you meant "pins" as they need to be removed as a pair - some folks find a nail or screw that will fit the hole and use it to hammer pins thru - others hammer a screwdriver blade into the gap of that link to pop the plate off

    I use a good chain breaker.
     
  3. xseler

    xseler Well-Known Member

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    I view tools as 'time savers'. I put a value on my time (depending on many factors, this value is ultimately different for everyone). If the estimated time to do a task without the tool exceeds the value (price) of the tool, I buy the tool --- even if I'll only use it once. Also, I find that my mental health is much happier.

    If you should have a Harbor Freight in your area, chain breakers are pretty cheap..........and if you stay with the hobby, you'll use the tool more than once. Good luck in your adventure!!
     
  4. Tony01

    Tony01 Member

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    The easiest way is to buy a chain breaker made for #415 chain. The best ones are the RLV breakers. A HF breaker is going to break... No pun.

    If you're a cheap sob, then you'll need a hammer, a 1/4" nut, a point punch or Philips drill insert, and a pin, screw, punch whatever smaller than the pin you're removing. and a small socket like a 1/4". Put the nut under the pin and hammer it till it's flat with the side plate. Should take one blow. Then use the point punch, maybe using vise grips to hold it, to punch the pin through the outer side plate approx 2mm. Then replace the washer underneath with the small socket, and punch the pin with a small punch or screw almost all the way out, till it is out of the inner link but still in the outer side plate. Pull the chain apart. If you go too far you won't be able to get it back in the outer side plate. Do the same on the other side, then align the new small link between the outer plates with the pin in one, hammer in the pin, then put a washer under the other side and hammer it so the pin sticks out the side plates the same. I got really good at this and have even done it for a friend out on the road with minimal tools such as a socket, nut, micro screwdriver, and a 10lb rock as a hammer.

    You should not be grinding on a chain you intend to re-use. The abrasive particles that end up on the rest of your chain will work themselves into the pins and rollers leading to uneven (and rapid) chain wear.
     
  5. forties

    forties New Member

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    Yea what he said.. if you can leave the pin hanging in that last side plate, it makes it so much easier punching it back in.
     
  6. el Diablo Guapo

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    41hYQ2W52oL.jpg
    this will probably do, https://www.harborfreight.com/heavy-duty-chain-breaker-66488.html - be gentle, this will likely do the job a fair number of times if you treat it kindly

    (same thing on amazon for $6.99 +sh)

    I have something like it, and it was quite expensive for what it is- but i consider this tool to be a necessity and mine does not fail.

    Based on my experience with the ones for bicycles(of which i have a bucket of ruined ones) cheap ones are prone to fail, good ones last a while longer...
     
    #6 el Diablo Guapo, Aug 17, 2017
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2017

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