Schwinn ebike

therockwall

New Member
Jun 7, 2008
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0
0
I bought a schwinn chopper bike off ebay that has a 24v 250w rear hub, the batt pack is located in the frame where you would mount the gas engine.
I have only rode it about 2 mi so far but it skats along like a skert rabbit.
I am in south tx so it is on flat roads. The book says it will do 20 mph and the batts will last 1-2 hours. Real happy so far. (c)
 

deacon

minor bike philosopher
Jan 15, 2008
8,117
3
0
north carolina
yes do that battery life is great. Of course a flat road is better for the batteries than the hills where I live. But one hour would take me to the store and back which is all one has to do these days.
 

eDJ

Member
Jul 8, 2008
530
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16
Wayne National Forest
Recently I was at a bike shop and the guy who owned it was showing me a Schwinn eBike. The motor was in the front hub and the battery pack was built into the carryer rack over top the rear wheel.

What he wanted to show me was how small the battery packs for these things are becoming. It looked like a 16 x 4 x 2 but he kept pointing to a line toward the front and telling me that was the control for charging and riding. So that was about 4 inches or so long leaving 12 inches to contain the battery cells.

I was wide open absorbing what he was saying, but when he said a full charge would be good for 40 miles I about flipped. This bike didn't have anything except that big front hub to betray it as being power assisted. If any lettering that said eBike were covered most people would pay no attention. As long as the rider peddled some it would pass as a normal bike rolling down the street.
 

Jemma Hawtrey

New Member
Dec 29, 2007
288
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Essex, UK
Back during WWII they had a problem with destroyers..

The engines they had plenty of, the hulls and equipment they had plenty of

What they couldnt get hold of was gearboxes.

So one bright spark (pun not intended) decided to solve that problem by directly connecting electric generators and motors to the diesels thus bypassing any need for an transmission.

We could use a similar system. Putting a small 20cc engine onto a bike would not make for stunning performance.. but how about putting that and a genset on there and some decent batteries.. then you would almost have a perpetual motion bike. while the 20cc engine is too much to charge batteries or provide motion alone, it could be set up using a rheostatic control system that kept the motor at its optimum speed and varied the output between the electric motors and the charging circuit :)

just a thought

Jemma xx
 

eDJ

Member
Jul 8, 2008
530
0
16
Wayne National Forest
Intriguing idea Jemma. The drive system you describe is almost identical what one of these uses:



Recently I watched some UTube video's where a electrical cell was made of a group of stainless steel plates lamanated with an anode & cathode. This was in turn emerced in a container of water with some bicarbonate of soda. When the electric battery current was switched to this the water froffed a mixture of hydrogen gas 2 and oxygen 1 in a free and combustable vapor which was then cleverly channeled into a 4 cycle motor.

Should a motor bike have a small car alternator coupled to a small 4 cycle motor where a battery pack was mounted in one rear saddle bag on the rear wheel....and on the other side the hydrogen/oxygen generation cell would make fuel for the engine........then the option would be for the engine to either drive the wheel thru belt or chain.....or have an electric motor in the front wheel like the Schwinn eBike. The electric motor in the front wheel would make it most like the Diesel Locomotive pictured above. That's where the Locomotive has it's drive motors....in the "wheel trucks". The operating engineers sit in the cab of the Locomotive and just behind them is a 600V alternator driven by a V16 turbo diesel engine. The electric from the alternator is switched to the motors in the wheels. A bank of lead acid batteries under the floor where the engineers sit basically is back up to operate the starter and heating elements in the fuel tanks and diesel engine
during the cold winter months. But a bicycle such as described.....would basically run on water. :eek: