Rear Sprocket adapter.

Aug 14, 2016
58
4
8
Texas
I have a standard walmart ordered Huffy Cranbrook. I upgraded to a spring tension which I love. Now I want to upgrade my sprocket.

I was told to get a 40 tooth adapter. But some sites ask me what 'diameter' I want ect. ect.

Could you guys link me to a good site to purchase one and the right specs to maintain. I'm not spending $80 just to have to send it back.

Thank you! much love to this forum community. Making my first build a wonderful experience.
 

LBC

New Member
Aug 8, 2016
45
0
0
Virginia
i got mine from mmbikeparts.com be sure to measure your hub so you won't have to get the hub reducer bushing.
very easy to install just make sure you place it properly on the hub or it might eat through your lower frame arm if not afixed right, just go slow and do it right ;)
ride safe
LBC
 
Aug 26, 2015
472
5
18
Overgaard AZ
Manic Mechanic, my friend, don't cheap out. The big haji companies like gasbike, and kingsmotors sell an inferior quality rip off for nearly the same price. The MM is made in the USA, and backed by real people. My adapter set up is on the way from him right now, no more rag joint b.s.
 

Kioshk

Active Member
Oct 21, 2012
1,152
7
38
Connecticut
The Monster's right...you'll be MUCH happier in the long-run if you spend some $$$ on good parts now. I would even recommend replacing the rear-wheel with something of better quality. I suspect that the Huffy's axle is mediocre at best. I wouldn't feel too safe with just a solitary coaster-brake either; the Cranbrook's designed for leisurely pedaling around the estate, or for popping down to the local boulagerie to pick up a loaf of French-bread for your picnic. That said, I suppose my suggestions go beyond the scope of your request, but I swear by the disc-brake interface mounted sprocket adapter I got from these guys:

http://www.bicycledesigner.com/rotor-and-sprocket-adapter.html

$65 delivered. High quality CNCed fat aluminum 44T sprocket included.

They also make a coaster-wheel kit, but it looks like they're outta stock...

http://www.bicycledesigner.com/motorized-coaster-wheel-brake-kit.html

Good luck, and have fun.
 
Aug 26, 2015
472
5
18
Overgaard AZ
Not to jab at Kiosk, but after much research, I decided against a disk brake replacement set up. The Manic Mechanic adapter allows for (sometimes) better alignment to the motor output, because it's adjustable across the hub, and with the insert sets available, can be made to fit just about any bicycle hub. I believe George even makes one to fit the old Strumy Archer and Bendix hubs. I know Pirate cycles offers one to fit the old SA three speed IGHs.

Basicly I chose the hub adapter route for the versatility. I'm also doing this bike with about four thousand miles under my belt, most with a fairly trouble free rag joint. The goal with my last bike was proof of concept for myself. I hauled around 360lbs or so, for fifty mile stretches. The goal with the next bike is for silky smooth stylish awesomeness, and room for a tall, scrawny red head.
 

ezrider

Member
May 18, 2016
121
2
16
Indiana
These rear sprocket adapters are a no brainer. May cost a bit more, but it sure beats the hassle of centering a spoke sprocket.
 
Jan 21, 2015
610
21
18
Portland, Oregon
Not to jab at Kiosk, but after much research, I decided against a disk brake replacement set up. The Manic Mechanic adapter allows for (sometimes) better alignment to the motor output, because it's adjustable across the hub, and with the insert sets available, can be made to fit just about any bicycle hub. I believe George even makes one to fit the old Strumy Archer and Bendix hubs. I know Pirate cycles offers one to fit the old SA three speed IGHs.

Basicly I chose the hub adapter route for the versatility. I'm also doing this bike with about four thousand miles under my belt, most with a fairly trouble free rag joint. The goal with my last bike was proof of concept for myself. I hauled around 360lbs or so, for fifty mile stretches. The goal with the next bike is for silky smooth stylish awesomeness, and room for a tall, scrawny red head.
You can space out the disc brake adapters as well if you get a little creative. I made some spacers for a friend of mine by cutting doughnut-shaped discs out of aluminum and drilling holes in them for the bolts, just make one with the desired thickness of aluminum to get the spacing you want.
 

Slogger

Member
Sep 8, 2014
545
4
18
nohio
+1 for the Manic Mechanic unit. Mine has been trouble free, never loosens up, runs true and the chain is nearly silent. It's always in perfect alignment.
A good investment in reliability.
 

Kioshk

Active Member
Oct 21, 2012
1,152
7
38
Connecticut
You can space out the disc brake adapters as well if you get a little creative. I made some spacers for a friend of mine by cutting doughnut-shaped discs out of aluminum and drilling holes in them for the bolts, just make one with the desired thickness of aluminum to get the spacing you want.
I was fortunate to have had no alignment issues, but standard steel washers could be used to raise the adapter off the hub to the desired clearance quite reliably.

Can't praise the BicycleDesigner adapter enough...really high-quality stuff. It's held up excellently, and there's been no discernible wear on the custom fat aluminum-alloy sprocket that came with it.
 
Jan 21, 2015
610
21
18
Portland, Oregon
I was fortunate to have had no alignment issues, but standard steel washers could be used to raise the adapter off the hub to the desired clearance quite reliably.

Can't praise the BicycleDesigner adapter enough...really high-quality stuff. It's held up excellently, and there's been no discernible wear on the custom fat aluminum-alloy sprocket that came with it.
Yea, that was what I did before I made the aluminum spacer. I just thought that all the washers looked kinda trashy.