RANT! flat tires

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by bandito, Aug 24, 2009.

  1. TerrontheSnake

    TerrontheSnake New Member

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    I've been looking, and haven't found it yet. There is a thread and the guy has sworn off of slime tubes. Bad front end blow out, the mess was part of his issue to, but he did talk about being concerned of the safety of them, and a discussion insued. I did state it was just a theory and therefore not claim it as fact. Just putting it out there, thats all.
     
  2. fall_down_stand_up

    fall_down_stand_up New Member

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    I think I can clear this up....When you talk about the tires getting hotter and the heat causing the slime to expand is just nonsence....I live 35 west of ft.worth texas and it has been 103 degrees or higher on a regular basis and in 3 1/2 years I have never experienced one problem with a blow out from the heat....And let me tell you the roads get so hot they get sticky like tar,im talking so hot that you cannot walk for more that 20 feet without shoes on with out hopping around like a little kid in a candy store....Once again,I have never had one problem other than hitting large screws or nails and punturing my tire and slowly go flat....
    John-Johnbrnot
     
  3. TerrontheSnake

    TerrontheSnake New Member

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    LoL, Once again I didn't swear off the slime tube (I'm not using one but I havent had the need) Just relaying info gleaned here LoL I live where it's cold most of the time so I wouldn't know. But the heat generated by high spead friction gets hotter than the asphalt. World Record Holder for the fastest Landspeed on a Bike quite a few years back Blew out her front tire going down a ski slope because of the heat created by friction I think she hit like 70ish mph so It's not totally impossible just not very plausible, I think theres a Youtube Video of her crash, but I'm at work and Youtube is sonic walled..
     
    #23 TerrontheSnake, Aug 25, 2009
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2009
  4. realdigga

    realdigga New Member

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    yea, i dont think my blowout was due to the tube, probably more the cheap tyre than the tube. it wasnt hot either. auflg
     
  5. Sydneysider

    Sydneysider New Member

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    getting sprayed with tyre slime after punctures is normal as it quickly works to seal the tube. sometimes if the puncture might be very big and the hole will open up again after a while if the wheel is rotated with the puncture up the top.. then you have to turn the wheel to get the puncture at the bottom so it can seal again.. bit tedious but it works for me :D
     
  6. Junster

    Junster New Member

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    I went with Servas Survivor Tires. They have inverse tread to make them roll easy and smooth. 4 layers of flat protection in the tire and they ride great. Great traction in the corners and no viberation at all. Best bike tires I've ever had. They are $40 each but worth it. Here's a pic that shows the tread design.

    P1010144.JPG
     
  7. Sydneysider

    Sydneysider New Member

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    yea Serfas makes a great tyre dont they.. Ive been using similar ones with exactly the same tread for about 3 years.. I'm soon going to test the Hutchinson Acrobat tyre which a friend said lasts atleast 3 times more .shft.
     
  8. TerrontheSnake

    TerrontheSnake New Member

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    Yeah that would be my actuall guess usually also. A crappy tire is usually the culprit.
     
  9. svejkovat

    svejkovat New Member

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    Nobody takes me seriously around here anyway, so use the following at your will. But DON"T come back with some lamea$$ completely unwarranted and unbidden crap like "prove it!".. or "that doesn't really make sense, and (tho i haven't actually tried it yet) here's why it doesn't..", or "yeah, I had one of those wire flikkin' thingamabobs on my tires when I was 10 and it didn't do a thing". Try it or don't. Noone cares but you.

    The following will save you from about 50 percent of your flats. Or about half of them, or somewhere close to half the way between most and almost, or darn near in the middle of ultimate success and catastrophic failure... depending upon how carefully you install it.

    Create a "mud flap" out of innertube rubber, no wider than the tire, and affix it to your bicycle such that it is very lightly resting on the tire. If you have rim brakes, the brake mounting post is a good place to put this. Cut an arc out of the rubber so that it somewhat conforms to the tire's radius when resting (gently) against the tire. Accuracy is not too important since soon enough the tire will wear the flap to a perfect fit.

    Because the innertube rubber is so pliant, it does not put enough pressure on the tire to put drag on your forward progress or wear the 'flap' so much that it's no longer touching the rubber of the tire. It wears to a point of equilibrium such that it's just very gently brushing the surface of the tire of debris while you ride and makes no noise. Many (50 percent?) of the items that cause flats begin by just barely embedding themselves in the rubber, and on the first go-around they're barely hanging on. Each time your tire meets the road, that little thorn or tack or nail gets pushed just a little farther in. Eventually, It gets worked all the way in to the tube, and there you go. You're walking.

    By gently brushing the tire each revolution, you brush away many (obviously not all) of the loosely attached menaces before they get a chance to keep getting pushed in further. I've been touring and racing bicycles since I was 13. I've got a godzillion miles on sew-up tires (that's how old I am now). Flat sew-ups were a NIGHTMARE. I've gotten lazy since I don't use the sew-ups any longer, and don't insist on having the innertube flap installed on all my bikes. It's so easy to fix clinchers, and I don't put thousands of miles a year on bikes anymore, that I'm less adamant about avoiding flats. But this isn't voodoo, and I'm not selling anything. Just assuring anyone who's curious that it works. Use it or don't. I don't want to hear about it.
     
    #29 svejkovat, Aug 26, 2009
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2009
  10. xlite

    xlite New Member

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    50%? IMO less than 1% if any. Goo, thorn proof, and outer liner easier and more effective. 99.9%

    Or plastic St Cristopher statue bolted to handlebars. :)

    You never know for sure though with these kind of things.
     
  11. roxrcool

    roxrcool New Member

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    sticking up for the slime tube. I've been running them FOREVER in bikes (even before motor bikes). had one blow out because of my own fault, but I filled it up, and lasted until I got home. just a little fyi; if you haven't experienced something, don't regurgitate someone else's useless info......
     
  12. drhofferber

    drhofferber New Member

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    xlite...i have a pair of solid airlrss tires, but have not put them on...can you give pros and cons on these tires...you are the first i've heard that has used them...thank you...Dennis
     
  13. xlite

    xlite New Member

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    My experience is with a solid tube and also a solid tire (wish I could remember the brand). Both were very hard to install and had a bad feel when riding. Hard to describe but quite uncomfortable when hitting those thick painted striped on the road and scary on turns. A buddy of mine had similar experience with a solid tire different brand.

    We both removed them and went back to thorn proof with slime because there was no advantge to the solid and couple major drawbacks. One of those thing that sounds like a good idea but...

    Possible that improvements have been made or other mfg are better but I doubt it.
     
    #33 xlite, Aug 28, 2009
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2009
  14. retromike3

    retromike3 New Member

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    have used successfully the tire liners and thorn proof tubes, But I still stay away from Slime or its copies because it makes it almost impossible to patch the tube afterward. For me the worst part is if I get a flat in the back wheel.

    Since there is two chains and not quite enough room to get everything put on strait (vertical drop outs don't help) its quite a chore to change a tube on the road. and once when I did I forgot to check the tire liner and by the time I got home it was flat again. I still don't like to fix flats if I can avoid it ,but I will still stay away from no air tubes or slime. Back 40 pounds ago I used to ride thirty miles a day on sew-ups and did not get that many flats because I watched were I was going and always took the glass off before it got stuck in there.(that's why fingerless gloves were invented, not for grip but to reach down a brush the glass off)

    Slime is a grate idea so you can sell new tubes and more slime, but otherwise its a rip in my humble opinion.
    :-||


    Mike Frye A.K.A. Frye Bikes
     
  15. Technocyclist

    Technocyclist Motorized Bicycle Senior Technologist

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    I've been using Kevlar belted tires, no issues so far... :)
     

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