"performanace" weedeaters?

comfortableshoes

New Member
Jul 22, 2008
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Beverly, MA USA
I snagged a homelite off craigslist for $15, I'm picking it up tonight after work. SHould be another good fun engine. The homelites have all kinds of modifications available for the RC boating industry. My father is into that and he's sent me to a few after market sites where they sell, mini radiators, cool kits, nitro, etc specifically for the homelite. I've read a few posts disparaging the homelite engine but unlike most weed eater engines it has bearings and not a reed. Apparently Echo and homelite are 2 of the few manufacturers that use bearings.

Has anyone taken a weedeater and done what the people who use them in rc boats and aircraft do and tune them add after market parts and make them scream?

I figure if I have an extra engine to play around with this winter I might try some of this stuff and see what happens.
 

Bikeguy Joe

Godfather of Motorized Bicycles
Jan 8, 2008
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up north now
Homelite goes waaaay back, and has a longstanding rep as a good hot engine, kinda like the old Mercury outboards.

I have never added aftermarket parts, but I have "converted" them for R/C aircraft use. I cut down the flywheel, and stripped them of everything....you may want to keep the fan/shroud. They do make tuned pipes, ect for them...have fun!
 

deacon

minor bike philosopher
Jan 15, 2008
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To be honest I'm not well balanced myself. I'm also not that mechanically inclined. If I did anything at all to an engine it would be for curiosity not to put on a bike. More speed is just a scary thought. I wouldn't mind more hill torque but I think that might just need to be more engine size.

I have yet to get a 31cc to work but so far it hasn't been the engine's fault. I installed the new one I bought wrong, I think. I had it all over the bike and the frame wasn't rigid enough. I think if the one I have coming doesn't measure up, I'm going to try more chainsaws. I don't know why but it seems to be heavier for some reason. I know it is weight wise.
 
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aulit

New Member
Aug 24, 2008
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actually they do have performance weedeaters (i know, i'm cutting grass for 3 months now.. 40hrs/week). If you can get a HT (high torque) weedeater, then you're in business, because these machines got twice the torque and sometimes more than a regular weed wacker...

Some examples:
most Echo
Shindaiwa 5120 (or 5210)

and you can get the newest Honda motor which uses same technology as the shindaiwa, in fact ist a 4-stroke engine that consumes mixed gas..... yeah....
 

LordMaximo

New Member
Aug 31, 2008
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High Plains Desert, Roy UT
If you are after torque for long rolling hills, I reccommend a 4-stroke engine. These engines are built for the long haul and are actually less expensive over a 2-stroke engine. Just like the old mini-bikes from the late 60's and early 70's. Centrifugal clutch as on a go-cart, jack shaft and chained to your mountain bike derailer. Now you have a pull start, electronic ignition, thumb trottle like a snow-mobil or wave runner, and gears to help you along. A 4 stroke engine setup is the best reliable build anyone could do. And you have all sorts of engine sizes to pick from.
Weed eaters are just for toys, such as R/C airplanes and small boats.
You can get a 6.5hp/ 196cc 4 stroke from Harbor Freight for less then $200 and I can asure you it will take you anywhere you want to go for cheap.
Harbor Freight Tools - Quality Tools at the Lowest Prices

It is well worth the time to do it right the first time around.

Maximo
 

deacon

minor bike philosopher
Jan 15, 2008
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so that is cheaper than my $20 ryobi... I'm sorry I just don't see it... I don't know about torque so I'll take your word for it, but for the price I'll just burn up a couple of weed whackers.

I think the 200 engine is a different animal from the weed whacker. Most likely it's a different mind set from the WW builder. I probably would just buy another 2 stroke kit for 200 bucks it would have all the parts and plenty of toque.

The four stoke kits are about 400 I think these days. That isn't based on knowledge just a vague memory.
 
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Motormaker

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Aug 6, 2008
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North Central Indiana
Maximo that is a great idea and cheap too. I went that route. Untill the cops stopped me and told me to get off the street or face an unlicenced vehicle ticket and a $75 to $100 tow bill. So now I am studying up on 50cc and under bikes to conform to the law. I am working with a 49cc pocket bike engine now.I am a Long time lurker first time poster. You guys got a great forum here for homebuilts.
 

LordMaximo

New Member
Aug 31, 2008
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High Plains Desert, Roy UT
I forgot about the new laws being tossed at us two wheelers as well. My bad.......lol.......there are those bobbers being handed out with 110cc units. I do know this, a motorized bicycle does not need to be tagged, as long as it still has the peddles opperational. Like the mopeds from the 70's.
I do know that Utah has now changed their cycle laws, if you have a motor on 2 wheels, it needs to be licenced, and they go by cc ratings for driver restrictions. 90cc, 249cc, 649cc. These classes are restrictions on your licence, and if you test on anything over 650cc, you are in the unlimited class. So, for those in Utah, it doesn't matter, if it has 2 wheels and a motor, it needs to be tagged and you need to have the proper papers to ride it on the open roads.
This is the first state, and the rest are sure to follow suite. I guess for those who can get away with the small cc motors, hats off and good luck to you all. Here in our state, they go the extra mile to collect money from every avenue they can find. Like the little pocket bikes, you need to have it registered and tagged, and you need to have the motor cycle endorsment on your drivers licence. Or you do face a trip to the judge.

Maximo
 

comfortableshoes

New Member
Jul 22, 2008
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Beverly, MA USA
pocket bikes aren't street legal here in Mass either, but I have a 4stroke 49cc pocket bike engine, cvt 4 speed tranny ready to go onto an OCC chopper frame. Frame is cut and ready for the mount, just waiting on funds to buy the motor mount, sprocket and chain, should be sick fast and haul @ss.

For me the 2 stroke weedwacker is more of an exercise machine- I pedal along with it so that I can keep my fat butt up with traffic so I'm safer.

The pocket bike motor- that's for my inner need for speed and burning rubber and to get my significant other into the fact that I want a motorcycle- a bike with a motor seems safer... then I get a moped, safer right, then I spring the Hog. And as of right now it's far cheaper becuase I don't need a motorcycle license or insurance here in Mass. For $40 I can ride it for 4 years.

I do agree with you a 4 stroke would have far more torque than a small weed eater. But with a jack shaft and a centrifugal clutch the weed eater motor can be modded into far more than one might think, Lets face it the chengines aren't much more than a 49cc weedeater engine with some gearing. (I'm not carping on chengines here either, I'm just saying they are one step away that's all.)

If I want to be legal her ein my state I have to be 50cc or less. So I'm sticking with that, there are a few websites that sell the hausheng honda 4 stroke 1.5-2hp clone for about $150. I am considering that for a build as well. There are site that sell kits for MB with those as well.
 

muddawg

New Member
Jul 26, 2008
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searching the net using the term "weedeater conversion"
i found all those suped up boat and model airplane engine plans

echo is a real good brand with dual bearings on the crank
and a recoil opposite the output shaft (real handy)

older stihls have theese characteristics too

yall give it another season and all the 4 stroke weedeaters will start showing up in yard sales cheap
the fuel lines only last 2 yrs at most and they get cheap real fast once that occurs

second hand/remanned ones can be had at sears parts depts
mine has 4 right now several 29cc and one 32 cc 4 strokes

theyre still a little over a hundred but thats better than new price
but if im gonna pay more than $100 im just gonna go get a new honda 50cc

the 4 stroke blowers are around 80 bucks

just a thought

mike
 

NID_FTL

New Member
Aug 25, 2008
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Sunny South Florida
agreed very handy, with regard to recoil oppisit of the output shaft. the McCullach mac 80 I am working with has this characteristic and I was wondering what other brands also. WoW 4 stroke blower only 80 bucks?
I want one. or do I? It seems there are so many options for a reclaimed powerhead maybe I will run into a 4 stroke. I was going to buy a Chineese Happy Kit and still kinda want to so I can see how it works and for some part's and such, but not in the budget for now. where else are theese motors manufactured? other than china and Japan?

what ones have double bareings? I am just a big ole bag of questions, lol...
 

comfortableshoes

New Member
Jul 22, 2008
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Beverly, MA USA
I agree, some of the 4 strokes have been showing up here on clist, not many and they are usually pretty pricey (out of my range) but if I ever see one south of $100 I'm going to jump on it. I'm putting away some cash ion my fun money account just for that.

Here's the issue that I've found the really nice 2 strokes and 4; like the echo and the stihl run for a long time for someone who performs regular maint on them.

Growing up we had one Craftsman, several echo and a stihl. GUess which ones are still running even 20 to 15 years later without issue? The Echos. The craftsman runs but it needs more help. Every year that echo starts up with no one issue. almost 20 years no issue. I look and look and look for one on c list and I'm never fast enough to get it.

Every spring at the start of mowing season I"d pray that they wouldn't start; I was never rewarded. They always started right up.
 

deacon

minor bike philosopher
Jan 15, 2008
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north carolina
If the price for a four cylinder comes down to where it is affordable as a throwaway I might go for one as well, but the two is so easy to work on, I might not either.

And just imagine how cheap these little beasts will be when the four stroke takes over the world. As long as there is a price issue, and dispose ability always is tied to that, I will keep on with the two stroke.

Frankly the jury is out on the size of the two stroke. I am trying to determine price vs benefits of the various engines I have worked with. I did like the bolens 31cc till it shook apart. That was my fault, but I do hope the ryobi on the way is better.

The used Poulan chainsaw has been better than I should have expected. Looking back I have shook a lot of engines apart, Two to be exact. I expect it was the rigidity of the mount that caused it. Has to do with twist I'm sure now. No part of the frame can be let without a brace and I did. A good rule I think is to design is so that if it vibrates, it all vibrates together with no twists in the engine frame. That seems to be a receipt for disaster. Live and learn.
 
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muddawg

New Member
Jul 26, 2008
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uhhhmmm...most bolens that ive seen were ryobi engines
theyre sold under 5 or 6 different names
yardman bolens crapsman...im forgetting the last few

but theyre american made or all i have are
possibly assembled in mexico...some maybe

and the ryobis are pretty tough critters

i can id the 2 strokers by site but im tryin to learn what ryobi 4 strokes look like

oh the remanned at sears have the same warranty as a new one !

mike
 
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timoc

New Member
Sep 19, 2008
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hello ,does any one have anything to say about original weedeater?the one i'm working with is XL50?50cc? looks pretty small if it is ,does have centrifugal clutch though...just wondering what best way to go friction drive,:bike2: or use the clutch and a jack shaft, am a machinist{24yrs...} so making the pieces shouldn't be to hard. new to this though and ready to build, thanks
 

comfortableshoes

New Member
Jul 22, 2008
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Beverly, MA USA
What is the clutch like? The clutch on my craftsman- a very old whacker was usable for friction drives but the one on my newer ryobi was not... The ryobi clutch was like a tin can... craftsman was much heavier. Dave's farm video talks about milling a new clutch bell on a lathe... have the video on my blog link below.

Probably isn't a 50cc more likely a 25 or 31cc.
 

deacon

minor bike philosopher
Jan 15, 2008
8,117
3
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north carolina
The one I used for my photo demo booklet turned out to be about 17cc I think. Pretty much a real nothing but they did make bigger ones I know. If there is a model number try to google the specs up.

Good luck if you are going to go with a jack shaft I can't help you much but if you decide to go friction it is pretty easy to do. Most anyone can give you a heads up on that so let us know what you decide to do.

For friction I would just toss the clutch and go with a gravity clutch. They are easy to build and easy to use.
 

timoc

New Member
Sep 19, 2008
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thanks,the clutch looks like regular centri-clutch only smaller, has @ 3/4" round almost inch long ,with a square end,this is an older one and does look well made, so if i'm getting this right with the gravity cluch i could do away with the housing and pull start,