My 2006 NE Yellow Whizzer

Discussion in 'Whizzer Motorized Bicycles' started by mason_man, Mar 8, 2019.

  1. indian22

    indian22 Well-Known Member

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    That NE-R is a great looking ride and deserves to be ridden and shared with the public. We seem to share the" lots of bikes" syndrome which centers around selecting whatever is fueled up and close to the door as our next ride, last in is first out. I'm maintaining ten bikes & typically only 3 or 4 are ridden each month. I've got to do better....

    Rick C.
     
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  2. mason_man

    mason_man Active Member

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    Lol....so true. Need to figure a way to balance it out. Still, I feel blessed to have this kind of problem.
    Glad to hear your having the same problem, lol...I think we're having to much fun.

    Ray
     
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  3. indian22

    indian22 Well-Known Member

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    Ray I've noticed some posts regarding the "new" Whizzer engines that indicate recurring problems with the head. What's your take on this?

    Rick C.
     
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  4. mason_man

    mason_man Active Member

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    Hi Rick, yes I've seen some of the postings about people having problems with New Edition Whizzer heads.
    Starting with the WC-1's and NE heads.
    With the WC-1 you could only shave off 45 thousands, anymore the head would crack between head bolt,spark plug.

    The ne heads had different combustion Chambers,some good and some not so good.
    I don't have any problems with any of them.
    I remove (shave)100 thousands from the wc-1
    I also like reworking the ne heads.
    Here's a picture of a wc-1 head before and after. Picture of the 3rd head from the right is one of the ne heads.

    I'll post more pictures of heads that have a thermal barrier coating soon. 20190506_173558.jpg 20190506_173613.jpg
     
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  5. indian22

    indian22 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Ray. Are you aware of any seemingly inherent problems with the newer engines?

    Rick C.
     
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  6. mason_man

    mason_man Active Member

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    20180611_154017.jpg 20180804_214713.jpg 20180821_152747.jpg 20181123_133210.jpg 20181123_131826.jpg Yes, Heat!
    These little motors run way to hot. Almost 600* and with no zinc in our oil.
    That's why I coat piston, valves, head,and exhaust port with a thermal barrier coating.
    I can bring down the heat to about 300* I do this to both vintage and new generation Whizzers.
    Most importantly I can eliminate any stress to my Motors.
    I'll post pictures

    Ray
     
  7. indian22

    indian22 Well-Known Member

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    Ray thanks, that's exactly the kind of information I was fishing for. Motor designs, especially in relatively inexpensive engines, aren't perfected works. I've found that most of the small engines like to moan about their health problems and hope we will listen and do something to help solve their issues. When I'm not feeling well I check my temperature and if it's elevated I do something about it. Diagnostic work isn't voodoo, but cutting the heat output in half is quite impressive & simple...once it's explained!

    I don't have a Whizzer at this point, but if I acquire one I intend to address the high heat issues as instructed Ray. Through the years I've decided that heat and imbalance are fatal flaws in most air cooled small engines of any type. Poor heat dissipation qualities, inadequate lubrication, limited external air flow, timing issues and the list goes on....most builders go straight for more power and this exponentially compounds the effects of the original motor' design inadequacies. The CG 2 cycle motors are an obvious example, not the best foundation to build on, but when it's inherent weaknesses are dealt with first (heat and imbalance etc,) quite a bit of power can then be extracted from them and they hold together quite well in daily riding.

    Great photos really help as well, thanks.

    Rick C.
     

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