"Making Biking accessible to everyone and making laws fair" Come on guys, it's time

YardMaster

New Member
Jun 8, 2008
12
0
0
"YOU REALLY SHOULD READ & PUT SOME THOUGHT INTO IT"

Dear all, I will be around to follow up on this. I will also have a more definative idea later.


Unfortunately, in a lot of places these bikes are illegal or restricted. I dont understand why a small 33cc golden eagle bicycle kit would not be allowed in some states. it is not fair to people who enjoy riding a bicycle, but because of bad knees or what ever- they have to give the hobby up. mopeds are great, but only if you are capable of coming up with the money. what it cost to buy a moped, most people have to set aside for emergency money. lot of people are just too poor or hard up to even buy something that will save them money.

Strange thing is that those little bike kits arent given the same consideration as the electric ones. electric is good, but not always feasable.

I do know one thing. Our main stream society really doesnt like motored bikes or mopeds. A lot of states pass discouraging laws for that reason..

They say the majority rules this country. I think that the "majority rules" thing stinks. A closed minded majority runs our country while the silent minority continues to shut up.

There is absolutely no reason why every state couldnt be open to a small 33cc bicycle engine for older or not such good of shape people who just dont want to give up cycling.
Furthermore, a country that has such manipulative legislation to bring about desired social results, is not a free country.....

Oh well, i guess you have deny some freedoms for the benefit of so called safety and the convienance of drivers and pedestrians who dont like having motored bicyclists around.....


We really should band together and change this. There is no reason that a small 33cc engine kit could not be considered a consumer product just like the electric kits.

Oh yeah, I almost forgot! anything powered by gas is classified as a motor vehicle.....
Does that mean a hedge trimmer is not a consumer product and therefore needs a liscense plate in order to trim a damn bush!?

Think about. Our apathy has alot to do with why we not a real free country, among other things.

Jason
 

deacon

minor bike philosopher
Jan 15, 2008
8,117
3
0
north carolina
Re: "Making Biking accessible to everyone and making laws fair" Come on guys, it's t

I don't see this as a conspiracy, I see it as ignorance. Only from lack of understanding. The points you make are valid, but then so are some of theirs. If I have no insurance who pays if I run a stop sign and plow into the Doctor's Mercedes.

Most cities and states are cutting us some slack because the numbers of us are small. Since I have never seen a kit on ebay go unsold, I can only assume the numbers are growing. I hope when I get this weed eater drive perfected, everyone who has an old bicycle and a weed eater can build one.

Some day there will be enough of us that we will rate our own place in the legal system. For now I am content to dodge the rain drops.

If I lived in a state that declared them illegal, I would do something more to get them approved. I just think approval will lead to more regulation for now I am content with the law as it is in NC. I go by the old saying, BE CAREFUL WHAT YOU WISH FOR.
 

Bikeguy Joe

Godfather of Motorized Bicycles
Jan 8, 2008
11,843
237
63
up north now
Re: "Making Biking accessible to everyone and making laws fair" Come on guys, it's t

Good points, both of you......right now we are small and flying under the radar. If we start a "movement" then it could lead to all kinds of regulations, manditory insurance, licensing, ect. I know that if you rattle the cage of the gov't. they have a way of making you sorry...e.i. the ultralight aircraft community. They wanted "just a little bit more" and poked sticks in the cage of the FAA (for 20+ years before anything happened)until it turned around and bit them. Not the sport/hobby is almost exstinct and/or a rich man's hobby/sport.

On the other hand, why should "regular bicyclists" be allowed to enjoy their hobby/recreations with little or no regulations? I realize some cities make you register your bicycle, but that's about it.

Where do you draw the line? kids and adults can ride bicycles with no hassles, but add something that makes a minute amount of noise, even at 23-35cc's and you are suddenly in a different arena.

I was speaking on another thread about a town/city that has outlawed motorcycles/scooters/moped/whatever that were under a certain cc- a rediculous 150cc's! That's just not working in my head...what if you rode into their little community ignorant of the law, but perfectly legal from where you left from, then what? They surely don't have a sign on the edge of town saying "no small motorcycle/scooters allowed", that would just be insanely ludacris.

Finally, someone who is well versed in the laws of the land (a lawyer) is needed here....beyond that, I have not a clue as where to start.
 

YardMaster

New Member
Jun 8, 2008
12
0
0
Re: "Making Biking accessible to everyone and making laws fair" Come on guys, it's t

Sure- I dont believe we should jump the gun as they say it. But, I would like some investigating to be done. Layout some ground work, wait awhile, then make a smart move when the moment calls it. Unfortunately, as you demonstrate with that one town, that only proves what I am concerned about is already on way.

As for 25-33cc engines are concerned- I believe they should be treated identically as bicycles. Bicycle brand brakes, lights, one mirror, and little horn. This as apposed to Motorcycle DOT approved parts. That will insure that this method is affordable to all the would- be bicyclists who just dont have healthy enough knee joints to pedal. Hilly areas do electric kits in real fast.

The most that these people really should be expected to do is register their bikes as bicycles. This way they know they are accountable. This is something that every person in every state should have a chance to do. As far as when, where, and how; I will leave this up to free social/cultural market conditions. However, would like to do investigating and preemptive planning before the ball is out of the park.
My intent is not to do anything except see who are friends are. Then maybe more substantial later.
Jason
 

smokinbenrage

New Member
May 18, 2008
30
0
0
Re: "Making Biking accessible to everyone and making laws fair" Come on guys, it's t

If I have no insurance who pays if I run a stop sign and plow into the Doctor's Mercedes.
The thing that I don't understand is that us MB'ers (Gasoline) are supposed to have insurance in some states, but in those same states, the people who ride the electric bikes do not need any insurance... My question is, why do they not need to get insurance but we do. If they plow into the Doctor's Mercedes, who is going to pay the bill. Some of these Electric bikes gan go about the same speed as ours.


-Ben-
 

deacon

minor bike philosopher
Jan 15, 2008
8,117
3
0
north carolina
Re: "Making Biking accessible to everyone and making laws fair" Come on guys, it's t

I think the big problem is that in the states there is no uniform definition of moped, and no definition of motor bike at all. Comparatively there are still so few of us nobody has bothered. One day someone will push the issue to the point that they define what a motorbike should be, then who knows.

The legislator's son hasn't had his vette hit by a motor bike yet, that's about the difference in insurance laws. You can not do as much damage with a motorbike as with a motor cycle or even a moped scooter, but some fool someday will run over a little old lady in a cross walk and **** will come down on us. If it happens to be a moped that smacks the old broad, then it will be time to change the definition of motor bike, I think. We are not mopeds but until there is a compelling reason to change it, I think it won't happen.
 

veloteq

New Member
Jun 4, 2008
1
0
0
Houston, TX
Re: "Making Biking accessible to everyone and making laws fair" Come on guys, it's t

I believe that many of you are missing the point. In 2002, the Congress passed a law, PL107-319, which tranferred responsibility for safety regulation of electric bicycles from the National Highway Administration to the Consumer Product Safety Administration. They may have been more far sighted than they realized, considering the current cost of gas. The reason for the law, which restricts the top speed of what they call low speed electric bicycles, was to encourage their use as an alternate method of local transportation. They reasoning was that the speed of 20 mph can be achieved by a bicyclist in good health, but the added electric motor would enable to them to travel longer distances. The law did not restrict the form factor of the electric bicycle. It relied primarily on the speed parameter and safety regulation of bicycles of all kinds under the Consumer Product Safety Commission. The problem that arose is that the states have the right to regulate traffic within their jurisdictions. Some of the larger states such as CA, TX, FL, GA, embraced the concept of electric bicycles and passed legislation harmonized with the intent of the Federal Law. Others, however, refuse to recognize them as bicycles in accordance with the Federal definition and continue to obstinately define them as motor vehicles under archaic laws. The Federal law prevails in terms of safety, however their hands are tied if teh states will not accept the wisdom of the legislation. It boils down to the old adage, you can lead a horse to water but you can't make it drink. All of the politicians are now jumping on the "green" and clean energy bandwagon, but it is nothing but political bombast, obsuring the fact that they are actually doing nothing at all, not even taking advantage of laws that were passed by Congress six years ago. I regret that the only thing I find green about the majority of them is the bile that they generate. Do not expect reason to prevail in the short term. There is little we can do except continue to pound away until enough of them will listen.

Jim Wood
Veloteq.com