Made a Tool Box

Gbrebes

Active Member
Jul 16, 2010
654
230
43
Los angeles
Hey Everybody,

Sorry I’ve been away for so long. I’m still riding and wrenching, just not posting here.

I recently made a toolbox for my bike. I like to have LOTS of tools on hand, as I ride fairly far away from home at times, and something invariably breaks, comes loose, or otherwise needs maintenance on the road.
I usually use a folding canvas tool roll strapped onto my gas tank, so I decided to try and build a metal tool box like some vintage 1900’s motorbikes.

Just thought I would share.

Stay safe,

Gilbert
 

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Gbrebes

Active Member
Jul 16, 2010
654
230
43
Los angeles
Hey Rocketj,

I don’t know who you are, but that stuff was funny right there! I don’t care who it is!

I know, it’s been a long time since posting, probably back when I made my fairing. I do feel guilty about it, but I’m still committed to riding and repairing/modifying the bike as needed.

For instance, a few months back, I was riding with my friend Bob and we stopped to discuss routes, then he looks at my bike and says, “Is that a crack in your frame?” Sure enough, my down tube was cracked all the way around near the head tube junction. Scary, but I still finished out the ride, because I figured it had been that way for a while,

Once I had it back in the shed, I had to dismantle to the bare frame and brazed in an outside sleeve over the frame crack,

I had to do a similar frame repair on my chain stays near the bottom bracket about a year ago.

I’m glad to see this forum is still functioning.

Gilbert
 
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RocketJ

Well-Known Member
Jun 20, 2018
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Hey Rocketj,

I don’t know who you are, but that stuff was funny right there! I don’t care who it is!

I know, it’s been a long time since posting, probably back when I made my fairing. I do feel guilty about it, but I’m still committed to riding and repairing/modifying the bike as needed.

For instance, a few months back, I was riding with my friend Bob and we stopped to discuss routes, then he looks at my bike and says, “Is that a crack in your frame?” Sure enough, my downriver was cracked all the way around near the head tube junction. Scary, but I still finished out the ride, because I figured it had been that way for a while,

Once I had it back in the shed, I had to dismantle to the bare frame and brazed in an outside sleeve over the frame crack,

I had to do a similar frame repair on my chain stays near the bottom bracket about a year ago.

I’m glad to see this forum is still functioning.

Gilbert
Glad to hear you're still active and that you were able to fix the crack before you wrecked.
 

zean

Active Member
Dec 5, 2010
230
49
28
california
Excuse me Gilbert. Your bike looks good. Unbelievable the number of details, skills and years of on the job experience it takes to build and ride one How many years and miles have you ridden the bike? If it is a lot of years and miles, could the frame cracks mean that you should replace the old frame with a new frame? Thank you Gilbert.
 

Gbrebes

Active Member
Jul 16, 2010
654
230
43
Los angeles
Hey Curt,

Good to hear from you!

No Donut Derelicts during your las visit to CA?

I don’t use the fairing anymore, it probably slowed me down more than anything on the track with the extra weight, and only a top speed of 45mph or so on the straights, no real wind resistance benefit.
It looked cool though, and it was fun to ride that way, although a little hunched over. The fairing is now hanging in the shed rafters.

Thanks for asking,

Gilbert
 

Gbrebes

Active Member
Jul 16, 2010
654
230
43
Los angeles
Hi Zean,

Thanks for the compliment. I finished this bike (my only bike) in 2012, so it’s 8 years old. Miles and n the bike? I don’t really know. I would guess it’s in the thousands, but how many thousand, no idea.

I hear you on the frame cracks signifying something, but I built this frame as a custom one-off using a vintage women’s step through frame, cutting it up where basically the only original frame parts are the head tube and the seat post tube. I bent, shaped, and brazed the new down tube and top tube using interior lugs. I also cut, lengthened a few inches, and spread the rear chain stays to fit the rear sheave.

In other words, hours and hours of work for me, and it just seems easier to braze the crack, then sleeve mend it and add gussets if necessary. Less work, and hopefully I‘M making the frame more robust In the process.

Gilbert
 

curtisfox

Well-Known Member
Dec 29, 2008
5,141
1,560
113
minesota
Hey Curt,

Good to hear from you!

No Donut Derelicts during your las visit to CA?

I don’t use the fairing anymore, it probably slowed me down more than anything on the track with the extra weight, and only a top speed of 45mph or so on the straights, no real wind resistance benefit.
It looked cool though, and it was fun to ride that way, although a little hunched over. The fairing is now hanging in the shed rafters.

Thanks for asking,

Gilbert
Nope, got there and everything was on lockdown, takeout food only. Fairing really made your bike, but can understand, draw back is not needed. Sure glad to here from you also, not much action scene the donuts shop visit. Was the high light of my visit to see all you guys, fun. No bikes around here just a couple china girls.........Curt