home brew

deacon

minor bike philosopher
Jan 15, 2008
8,117
3
0
north carolina
okay I have a brand new engine on my friction drive bike. Broke down and bought a new weed whacker just for the engine. Now I need a new drive wheel. I have been using a plain smooth galvanized pipe nipple.

So the question is, "Does anyone have a recipe for a friction drive wheel. I would like to make one from an old bicycle tire but have no idea how to make it stay on the drive wheel.

Heater hose won't do it wears out far too quickly.

So I'm open to suggestions. The drive shaft on this engine is 5/16 fine threaded and pretty short probably an inch or so long. Lets see how inventive you guys are.
 

deacon

minor bike philosopher
Jan 15, 2008
8,117
3
0
north carolina
I did use a caster wheel on an ebike but I haven't had an adapter made for this bike yet. I probably will have to find someone who welds to make me one.

I found a post on another forum (found it on google and sneaked in the back door.) Some guy there made a mixture of jb weld and sand, then coated his metal spindle Let it cure a couple 24 hours. I think I might give that a shot.

I have a couple of bolt on axle pegs that I can use if they fit the engine alright. I can rough them up with my rasp then fill them in with jb weld and sand. It's probably worth a try. I would never have occurred to me to do that.
 

deacon

minor bike philosopher
Jan 15, 2008
8,117
3
0
north carolina
I have one of those with the sprocket and chain. I used it for ebikes and it worked really well. I even have a sprocket for a gasoline engine that worked for a while as well. I may have to give it another try except these more powerful engines will not seem to drag start as the 35cc did. More compression I expect.

However today I did make the jb weld jacket for my drive wheel. I am going to see how that does on my 1 1/4 inch drive wheel. If it acts as though it needs the smaller drive I can go with a 3/4 inch ID plumbing nipple with a washer welding to the end. If this system seems to work but if I need a smaller drive wheel I will be asking someone to weld it for me. Just have to wait and see.

Tomorrow this time I will try out the new drive wheel, and the new adjustments I made in the clutch rod and the throttle linkage.
 

deacon

minor bike philosopher
Jan 15, 2008
8,117
3
0
north carolina
In order to keep the number of threads down I have an opinion question. I know what too much oil does and what not enough might do, so here is the opinion. I am running the china bike and a week eater bike. China bike is 32/1 Weed eater is 40/1 Oil I use is set for 40 to one on the label.

currently mixed 32/1 cause it is what I had laying around. Tomorrow I need to mix new batch. If you wanted to use one mix for all, what would you do 32/1 or 40/1 or 36/1 that last is a joke.
 

deacon

minor bike philosopher
Jan 15, 2008
8,117
3
0
north carolina
thats my thinking the china bike doesn't
get run all that hard so it should be okay. Then again the weed eater will be run harder than normal so the 32/1 might be good for it
 

eDJ

Member
Jul 8, 2008
530
0
16
Wayne National Forest
Deacon, I've run all kinds of 2 strokes starting with Grand Dad's ol' Scott Atwater outboard which used 30 weight non detergent at 16:1 originally.

Talk about smoke on the water....it was like we were foggin for misquitos.

But one thing remains consistant, use a good grade of oil BIA/TCW, observe the suggested mix ration (perhaps richer with oil for break in), and read your spark plug often.

I'm probably telling you stuff you already know but some of the others may be less experienced.

On plugs it may be worth while to make certain you have the exact plug for your engine that the manufacturer suggest. Then visit the parts supply house and see if you can run down where that plug is in the heat range. Is it a hot, medium, or colder plug running plug. If you want to switch to another brand it may be worth pulling the cylinder head and fitting the plug to observe if the reach of the plug stops flush with the combustion chamber with only the electrode extending past the surface. If a plug reach is too short.....you loose compression, and if it extends too far into the combustion chamber the threads absorb heat like the cylinder cooling fins and make the plug run way too hot. Often people grab those plugs on a display card at WalMart or Lowes and slam em into the engine and it runs so they use it. Fortunately in a string trimmer or blower it's only for a few minutes each week but on a motorized bike it can lead to troubles. 2 cycle plugs can run 15% to 30% hotter than 4 cycle plugs and running hottest at lower speeds.

I always run resistor plugs, especially in points and condensor ignition systems. The resistance cuts the destructive last electrical cycle (spike) and
enshures the slower eroding of the point surface. It also doesn't make the
neighbors radios etc buzz when I ride by. (something to remember when riding by a police cruiser and your ignition tears up their 2 way radio)

My grand ma's ol weiner dog always seem to know when I was coming minutes before I arrived. She though the dog was psychic. It wasn't until one day my dad was riding the bike to get some gas for the lawnmower that I realized what the dog knew. At about 2 miles away there was four way stop and the Grandmother always had her kitchen radio playing. When dad pulled out from that stop the radio made a revving buzz and the dog shot to the door barking to get out. I had originally thought it may have been the exhaust note of the bike but had a big truck been in front of me or the wind blowing in a different direction she wouldn't have been able to consistantly know I was coming. The radio on the other hand was the dog's early alert system. After I installed the resistor plug the dog would only go barking at the door when she head me coming up the street. I don't know if dogs can think like we do but I'm sure they can reason.

On reading your plug, you need to have a few new plugs and your tool kit and ride out to a long stretch of highway where you can ride several minutes in a straight line at your top speed. Have a magnifying glass and flashlight in your kit too. Install a new plug, fire it up and go like you would usually ride.
When you're ready to stop, kill the engine with a kill switch abruptly and coast to a stop. When the engine has cooled after a few minutes pull the plug and read it. If the ground electrode or center electrode look like they are rounding off then you may be overheating......from lean mixture or improper timing. I was taught that if the ground electrode appeared to be effacing it could be mixture, but if the center electrode held in ceramic insulation is porus and grainy looing you may have a timing issue. It should look clean and fairly white.

If your center electrode appears to have small metal balls cling it it and some black specks then your mixture is too lean. It may even coat the center electrode with an aluminum colored coating. (aluminum from the piston)

If you look deep into the open end of the plug.......where the ceramic meets the metal shell of the plug that is where the electrode runs it's coolest. There may be a ring of carbon around that part of the ceramic in there. Yet the tip be fairly white and clean. This should be the look of a 2 stroke engine that is getting a good fuel air ratio thru the carb. If the fuel is mixed with oil at 40:1 and that deleivered into the engine at 15:1 (fifteen air to one fuel)
thru the carb then the engine should be running well. The carbon colored ring
will be present but possibly faint. Outboard 2 strokes may run 50:1 to 100:1
ratios. They may run CDI ingitions and variable spark duration systems to extend the dwell and spark duration.

Some 2 strokers are now using exhaust gas temperature with a sensor to
switch between ignition timing profiles.

But learning to read plugs is an art everyone here should take up.

Seventh up from the bottom of this page is a link to reading plugs with color photos and explanations:

http://www.bcchapel.org/pages/0003/kolb.htm
 

handy_Biker

New Member
Jul 23, 2008
23
0
1
5/16 fine thread.. Im using a Thread extender from the hardware store $1.79 but i'm sure it can be had a lot cheaper, then any bolt with 5/16 fine thread to bolt together just about anything you want.
 

handy_Biker

New Member
Jul 23, 2008
23
0
1
I was at the 'Hardware store, looking for a solution for a 'Quick gear change' issue. Looking at electrical conduit... I noticed some kind of a conduit joiner thats a perfect ' slides right over the conduit, no play'. If I can somehow make the 1/2inch conduit on tho the crankshaft, and drill maybe one hole all the way thru so that the Joiner is held into place with a release pin ( like on the decks of some riding mowers, looks sorta like a BIG bobby hairpin), I could make the rollers on the Joiners. Pop the pin, change the gear, put the pin back in, away you go!!

Caution: I havent tried this yet :D
 

deacon

minor bike philosopher
Jan 15, 2008
8,117
3
0
north carolina
What I ended up doing was from the plumbing department of the hardware store. First of all you can use it in 1/2 or 3/4 inch pipe. Get yourself a galvanized end cap. Drill a hole to fit over your shaft. Then bolt it down tight, really tight. Now you can run in galvanized nipples with all kinds of good stuff expoxied onto them. Changing them out is a snap.

I have used this for the last couple of days very successfully.
 

geeksquid

New Member
Feb 14, 2008
114
0
0
What I ended up doing was from the plumbing department of the hardware store. First of all you can use it in 1/2 or 3/4 inch pipe. Get yourself a galvanized end cap. Drill a hole to fit over your shaft. Then bolt it down tight, really tight. Now you can run in galvanized nipples with all kinds of good stuff expoxied onto them. Changing them out is a snap.

I have used this for the last couple of days very successfully.
You mean an end cap like this?
 

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geeksquid

New Member
Feb 14, 2008
114
0
0
What I ended up doing was from the plumbing department of the hardware store. First of all you can use it in 1/2 or 3/4 inch pipe. Get yourself a galvanized end cap. Drill a hole to fit over your shaft. Then bolt it down tight, really tight. Now you can run in galvanized nipples with all kinds of good stuff expoxied onto them. Changing them out is a snap.

I have used this for the last couple of days very successfully.
How about this. If you've got any shaft threads to screw it onto, looks like it would work. Just add a nipple.
 

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geeksquid

New Member
Feb 14, 2008
114
0
0
use a maglite with a bolt thru it... WORKS GREAT, its a perfect texture if you cant use a wheel
I'm confused. Yesterday at 8:02am you said the bolt in the maglite kept stripping out and then said it again in another post yesterday evening. But now you've said it WORKS GREAT. Yes, they do have a better texture with the knurled metal than a smooth piece of pipe, but the metal walls on a maglite are fairly thin and I doubt can handle any amount of torque.