Gas Tank Edge Guard

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle Welding, Fabrication and Paintin' started by 2door, Jan 23, 2009.

  1. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    I was poking around in some of my junk stuff today and came across some edge guard material that I had purchased some time ago for a hot rod project. It is meant to be used on raw edges of automotive interiors. In fact I bought it from an interior and trim supplier. It is a rubber-like material with a heat activated adhesive that holds very well after it has been applied. I used it to hide the pinch weld on the seam of my gas tank. I think it looks a lot better than the raw edge and thought I'd share these pix with you.
    Photo 1 is a closeup of what the material looks like, photo 2 is the before look and picture 3 is the tank after the edge guard was applied. I used a heat gun to soften it and to activate the adhesive while I was putting the stuff on. The man at the trim shop said it will stick even when applied in hot sunshine. But it's cloudy and cold today so the heat gun was helpful.
     

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  2. jasonh

    jasonh New Member

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    Hey that adds a nice touch. Good find :)
     
  3. seca40

    seca40 New Member

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    Muuuuuch better.
     
  4. Retmachinist

    Retmachinist New Member

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    Great idea Tom. I have always thought that seam around the middle of these tanks was ugly. Has a much more finished look.

    John
     
  5. FileStyle

    FileStyle New Member

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    I used the chrome (also available in black) auto door edge protectors to wrap my tank with! found at all auto supply stores. I had to use two pieces since one wasnt enough!
     
  6. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    Jslay,
    I'm not sure what it was called nor do I have a brand name. I was doing the interior of my hot rod and went to a interior and trim supplier here in Denver. I needed something to trim out the edge of a fiberglass console I had built and the guy there showed me a sample of the stuff. I bought few yards and used what I needed and had several feet leftover. That's what I used on my tank. I'm sure any good interior supply place would have something similar. The nice thing about the stuff I had was the heat activated adhesive. Once heated it really sticks. Get it right the first time cause it's hard to get off if you make a mistake. Maybe print a copy of my photo closeup of the material and take it with you to the store.
    Tom
     
  7. trackfodder

    trackfodder Member

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    HEY Interesting. I stuck some of that stuff on awhile back in response to someone determined to whack the seam off and weld it. It saved the tank a nasty whack from a falling something in the shop very soon after I did it. I wasn't aware it was a heat sealer however. It has been sticking just fine from friction up to now. I will do the heat gun thing tomorrow. Thank you sir. I have another HT tank due Tuesday for the 20" Schwinn/B&S model N. It will get it too. Regarding the Schwinn, it has a Stingray spring fork with a 48-spoke 20" Mongoose BMX wheel but could accommodate a 26" wheel. In order to mount a caliper brake, I milled some magnesium to straddle the fork struts with. Next is a crescent cut out to clear the fender (when I find it) Now job one is vacuum all the mag cuttings before a grinding spark sets it off. I really love my hand-held HFT power bandsaw. It cuts huge chunks of mag like butter.
     
    #7 trackfodder, Feb 10, 2009
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2009

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