frames, rims, tires, etc.

ragdolldude

Member
May 6, 2016
38
0
6
Mira Loma, CA
I'm begging to put together a motorbike. Honda 4 stroke 49cc, belt drive with V-plex clutch--want to try without jackshaft. 26 inch rim with 24 inch sheave. What would be better choices in frames for durability? In regards to tires/tubes, best tires, puncture-proof tubes for prevention of flats? In regards to rims, alloy or steel and gage of spokes recommended for dependability? Thanks
 
Jan 21, 2015
610
23
18
Portland, Oregon
12 gauge spokes, triple or quad laced, steel frame, puncture proof tires (I also use puncture proof inserts as well), double walled rims. IMO don't bother with puncture proof tubes if you get puncture proof tires and inserts, anything that makes it through the tire and the insert isn't going to be stopped by the tube. If you can't afford 2 perfect tires, beef up the back tire more.
 

s1rvr15

Member
Jan 16, 2016
65
3
8
Hales Corners, WI, USA
A few days late, but don't go with steel rims. Pretty much everything TheNecromancer13 said; additionally, I recommend Continental Gatorskin tires, $50 apiece, but are puncture resistant and good for many miles. As for frame, if you're going cheaper brands (Huffy, Scwhinn, et cetera) go for steel, but a quality frame (Trek, Felt, even Surly), aluminum or steel works (if doing aluminum, put padding between mounts and the frame, otherwise the vibration can damage the frame). Personally, I love the Trek 820: great steel frame, good components (Bontrager and Shimano), and relatively cheap. Plus you don't need to do any wheelbuilding or bare frame assembly.
 
Jan 21, 2015
610
23
18
Portland, Oregon
A few days late, but don't go with steel rims. Pretty much everything TheNecromancer13 said; additionally, I recommend Continental Gatorskin tires, $50 apiece, but are puncture resistant and good for many miles. As for frame, if you're going cheaper brands (Huffy, Scwhinn, et cetera) go for steel, but a quality frame (Trek, Felt, even Surly), aluminum or steel works (if doing aluminum, put padding between mounts and the frame, otherwise the vibration can damage the frame). Personally, I love the Trek 820: great steel frame, good components (Bontrager and Shimano), and relatively cheap. Plus you don't need to do any wheelbuilding or bare frame assembly.
Trek 820 is an amazing frame for motorizing, although I'd have to advise against the gatorskin tires. Although they are good bike tires and will last many, many miles, they are somewhat lacking in traction. I tried putting them on a bike I had once and discovered that if I tried to accelerate too fast I would do a burnout, and god forbid there was any debris in the road, I would lose traction really fast.
 
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s1rvr15

Member
Jan 16, 2016
65
3
8
Hales Corners, WI, USA
Really any Trek bike is a solid choice, but the hardtail MTBs and hybrids are the best choices. Granted there's probably some bias since I work at a Trek dealership, but they're, objectively speaking, solid bikes.
 

bairdco

a guy who makes cool bikes
Aug 18, 2009
6,549
249
63
living the dream in southern california
As always, remember you're asking for advice, not facts.

There's nothing wrong with a good quality steel rim. A heavy duty Worksman steel wheel with 11g spokes is indestructible. Heavy, but who cares.

A well built aluminum rim is fine, but adding a sheve and the extra torque from a motor, you'll need a strong, quality rim, properly laced, and not the 49.99 complete wheel from amazon.

Frame is subjective. I don't like aluminum frames because of vibration, and a strong alloy frame usually has thicker tubes, added gussets, and bigger welds, which negate any weight savings, and is more prone to metal fatigue.

I'm not a trek dealer, so I'm biased the opposite way. I think they're plain and ugly, low end treks are junk, and I don't see any reason to spend the extra money for a hi end trek when you can get the same boring diamond frame from a million other bike makers for less.

Engine fitment is a factor, too.

Your questions are too vague to provide a "correct" answer.

Are you going for a stylish, custom build, or a daily, mostly problem free commuter?

Search thru the forums and you'll find many examples of what works (and what doesn't. )
 

ragdolldude

Member
May 6, 2016
38
0
6
Mira Loma, CA
Not any theme really, just something that looks well put together, is dependable, leaning towards Worksman wheels too. 4 stroke motor for sure and would like to try full v belt drive. I had a minibike I made in the mid 60's and the total chain drive through a jackshaft was annoying. I made a lowrider mini bike out of an old 20" bike frame, old Power Products 2 stroke motor, Vplex clutch with pulley attached to a 10 inch rear wheel. Just got a NOs VPLEX clutch last week, after looking for a 2 years. Want something to build that is sturdy, dependable, not a 2 stroke (my preference only), and something I can build without a machine shop. Likely extended frame if I can find one without complete bike.
 

mat_man

New Member
Jan 29, 2011
224
1
0
athens ga
CST Cyclops tires in 26" or 24".

Aluminum rim on front wheel if using rim brakes.

Pre-1992 bankruptcy Schwinn Cruisers. Especially Pre-1977 Schwinn Middleweight Cruisers, per msrfan.

Pre-1990 Mountain bikes that had a more Cruiser based design (longer wheelbase, relaxed geometry)
with frames made in Japan, Taiwan and Schwinn USA.
Only the stronger non-butted tube frames found on less expensive (approx. $300 new) models,

1988 Diamondback Fleet Streak:
 

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