First Motorized Bike, what would you do?

Discussion in 'Motorized Mountain Bikes and Road Bikes' started by platinum_vmax, Feb 18, 2016.

  1. platinum_vmax

    platinum_vmax New Member

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    Greetings from frozen Ohio! I have a nishiki pueblo mb that I want to motor. Problem is my wheels only have 32 spokes and if I did a mid engine build I definitely want a hub adapter so I guess an in frame build is out.
    I like what I have read about the staton fd kits. Was thinking of getting the one with the zenoah engine. My other consideration would be a basic staton install kit and maybe a huasheng 49cc from bicycle-engines.com. I am 180 lbs, roads around here are 50\50 flat and rolling hills. Was hoping you guys could offer opinions or advice.
    Thanks!
    Kevin
     
  2. platinum_vmax

    platinum_vmax New Member

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    I don't know why the second sentence says motorized already.. It won't let me edit..
     
  3. Agreen

    Agreen New Member

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    Friction drive is good, but keep in mind that when the tire gets wet, it's effectively useless. I did a few diy friction drive bikes a few years ago, so that's always something you could give a shot if you think your fabrication skills are up for it.

    Just FYI, I am also 180 lbs, I have a Skyhawk frame with a 48cc 2 stroke. The whole bike probably weighs 35-40 lbs (with a full tank and batteries) and getting up hill is no problem.

    And those Staten kits look legit! I built a chainsaw engine bike and made something very similar to that. I mounted the engine on top of the channel iron and ran a chain off the clutch to a roller. It was compact and more balanced in my opinion. Unfortunately I could never get it running right and scrapped it. I may try again one day.

    And I'm glad you didn't speak about the bumblebee bolt on kit. Awful!
     
    #3 Agreen, Feb 18, 2016
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2016
  4. platinum_vmax

    platinum_vmax New Member

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    Thanks Agreen, this will be just something to cruise on nice summer days. I don't plan on riding in rain but if I get caught in not a big deal. Just sounds like a lot of fun. I am a mechanical designer by tade and could do a diy but would prefer to get a tried n true kit. I also want to get a cheez fickenworth kit and a new cruiser but wanted to motor the bike in my garage first.
     
  5. Agreen

    Agreen New Member

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    The 4 strokes will definitely have more torque for your hilly areas, so no worries there. And the PK80 kits from cheez are good stuff. You just won't get the torque (or reliability, in my opinion) as you will from a 4 stroke kit.

    I completely understand wanting something as a kit. They just work. Every time I try putting something together I end up over thinking it and it gets too complex and something doesn't work as expected.

    Cruising around when the weather is nice is the best part about owning a motorized bike. You don't have to go full throttle to enjoy the ride. Matter of fact, I think it's more fun to putt around at normal bicycle speed.
     
  6. platinum_vmax

    platinum_vmax New Member

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    So for a fd setup, would you go for the huasheng 4 stroke or the zenoah 2 cycle? The huasheng though Chinese seem good, I haven't seen many bad posts about them. Guess it's a Honda 50cc clone. Yet zenoah is Japan quality which are usually bullet proof. I'm not looking to fly down the road but good cruising power would be a definite bonus
     
  7. Agreen

    Agreen New Member

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    I'd go for the Huasheng 4 stroke. I've never heard of the zenoah, but I'm not saying it's not good.
     
  8. platinum_vmax

    platinum_vmax New Member

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    OK cool, thanks for the replies!
     
  9. Agreen

    Agreen New Member

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    Looking at the staton kit, it seems like it's a knurled roller. That'll probably work better if you go through a puddle. I had a smooth roller on all mine. It did nothing but slip when I rolled through water.
     
  10. Agreen

    Agreen New Member

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    Now I want to build one...
     
  11. phatcruiser

    phatcruiser New Member

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    I built a staton friction drive on a Phat Cruiser. It would top out at 23 MPH. It has to be dry to work. I swapped out the Mitsu Clone for a Tanaka. It was easy to build and I spent all my time riding and not wrenching. They are worth it.
     
  12. phatcruiser

    phatcruiser New Member

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    You could just buy a rear wheel with 36 spokes. They are easy to find and it would probably be cheaper to buy a rear wheel and in frame kit than a FD kit from Statin.
     
  13. Otero

    Otero New Member

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    For a first build, the Staton kit is the simplest, bombproof build...
    but, as stated by Agreen, slippery when wet. I made a simple improvement
    on the drive roller the performs better in the wet, but will eat a tire fast
    if you get heavy handed on the throttle. Burning #60 grit emery paper, I
    then panned out & dried the grit. I mixed the grit with J & B weld & painted
    it onto the roller to a uniform surface. This grips like crazy. Being next down
    from diamond in hardness,the emery is a durable surface that doesn't wear
    easily. Should mine ever wear, it's easy to mix more paste & reapply.
    Engine? I've got a cardboard box full of 'em. Spend the the money & get a
    Tanaka PF-4000, a reliable, clean, powerful 2-stroke that is lighter with
    fewer moving parts to go wrong. I've a Huasheng I'd give you, but I'm not
    that cruel.
    If you want a kit that's all weather/all terrain, get a GEBE. I spent hours &
    plenty of bucks before building a viable DIY belt drive. GEBE has done the engineering
    for you. They are not cheap, nor are the Tanakas, but you get what you pay for.
    My belt drive was insanely labor intensive. The GEBE is simple,...BUT you must
    read the instruction carefully and not make assumptions. First of all, make sure
    it will fit your bike. the info is on their site.
    P.S. I would dispute Agreen's statement that 4-strokes have more torque. My
    40cc Tanakas will out perform any gx50cc Honda or Huasheng 4-stroke.
     
    #13 Otero, Aug 16, 2016
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2016

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