Electric Hub Motors ... ???

vja4Him

New Member
Nov 6, 2008
16
0
0
California
I'm really a dummy when it comes to anything mechanical or electrical! If I understand correctly, if I buy the electric hub motor for my Electra Townie, I will no longer have the gears that came with my bicycle available for pedaling?

I need to keep the gears that came with my bicycle, so I can still ride my bicycle with no motor as often as possible. I need the exercise and enjoy riding, but also need to commute to various job assignments where there is no bus service, and too far for me to pedal (10-15 miles each way).

I want to get something that will last many years, and allow me to attain speeds of at least a good solid 35mph (45mph would be better, so I could ride on the country roads where the speed limit is between 45-55mph), with my weight, plus groceries (will not be riding fast with groceries!!!, only around 10mph then!).

When I go to work, my weight is around 210, plus my large backpack, which normally weighs around 15 pounds. Groceries will add another 15 pounds, sometimes more ....

So, I need a good quality motor that will easily carry over 250 pounds, reliable, effecient, long lasting ..... I've been checking around on different websites, but am still a bit overwhelmed ... !!! Help please ... !!!! Thanks!
 

Walter F.

New Member
Jun 4, 2008
326
0
0
Connecticut
They make hub motors for the front wheel, if you can't find what you need here -- google " Bicycle Electric Hub Motors" and get out your wallet. Happy Hills & Trails Walter F.
 

vja4Him

New Member
Nov 6, 2008
16
0
0
California
Riding At High Speeds ....

They make hub motors for the front wheel, if you can't find what you need here -- google " Bicycle Electric Hub Motors" and get out your wallet. Happy Hills & Trails Walter F.
Several people have mentioned that the Electra Townie would not be a good choice for the front-wheel hub motor, because of the forks.

Also, several people have said that speeds of faster than 20 mph are illegal, and not practical for a bicycle. I don't see any problem riding my Townie 35 mph, or even 40 mph, for short spurts (like 1/2 mile, or even one mile), especially if the road is good. I'm wondering if it would be legal if I get a moped license ... ???

Does anyone have experience riding their bicycle at high speeds?
 

Weedylot

Angry Old Fart
Jun 12, 2008
453
1
0
Tucson Arizona
I built a trike for an elderly friend using a hub kit from Spooky Tooth. It was pretty zippy at 22 MPH, plenty fast enough for a trike.
Front mounted hub motors put some stress on the headset bearings and can wear out a cheap set-up, so make sure you have some quality bearings and fork and that they're properly lubed. Going over say, 25 MPH can be a dangerous activity when its time to stop. Most bike brakes aren't designed to stop quickly from speeds over 30 MPH and from 25 are still a little shaky.
I don't think speeds over 35 are conducive to a long life. (The bike's and yours)
Try low and slow first, then progress until you've got pole position at Indy.
Check with your state's moped/motorized bike laws. In Tucson the city laws are slightly different than the state's laws. No motorized bikes allowed past 20 MPH, no matter what endorsements you have.
 
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vja4Him

New Member
Nov 6, 2008
16
0
0
California
600W Thunderbolt - Crystalyte 408 ... ???

After researching the matter ... I would agree that 25 mph is good enough for riding my bicycle around town. Even when I drive my van to work, I only average around 20 mph ... !!! Not very good for driving a van! There are so many stop signs, signal lights, and so much heavy traffic.

Without a motor on my Townie, I only average around six to seven mph, so with a motor I should be able to double or triple my speed, and cut travel time at least in half, probably better ... !!!

So, I'll be happy to get something zippy, with extra long-life batteries, and good acceleration ... I've been looking at the 600W Thunderbolt, and the Crystalyte 408.

If I get enough from my tax return, I'm hoping that I can spend at least $1,000.00, perhaps as much as $1,500.00, or even more! Last year my tax return was more ... Not sure if they will have the child tax refund in 2009 or not ... ???

I built a trike for an elderly friend using a hub kit from Spooky Tooth. It was pretty zippy at 22 MPH, plenty fast enough for a trike.
Front mounted hub motors put some stress on the headset bearings and can wear out a cheap set-up, so make sure you have some quality bearings and fork and that they're properly lubed. Going over say, 25 MPH can be a dangerous activity when its time to stop. Most bike brakes aren't designed to stop quickly from speeds over 30 MPH and from 25 are still a little shaky.
I don't think speeds over 35 are conducive to a long life. (The bike's and yours)
Try low and slow first, then progress until you've got pole position at Indy.
Check with your state's moped/motorized bike laws. In Tucson the city laws are slightly different than the state's laws. No motorized bikes allowed past 20 MPH, no matter what endorsements you have.
 

Bobocop

New Member
Jan 6, 2009
5
0
0
Toronto
I'm really a dummy when it comes to anything mechanical or electrical! If I understand correctly, if I buy the electric hub motor for my Electra Townie, I will no longer have the gears that came with my bicycle available for pedaling?

I need to keep the gears that came with my bicycle, so I can still ride my bicycle with no motor as often as possible. I need the exercise and enjoy riding, but also need to commute to various job assignments where there is no bus service, and too far for me to pedal (10-15 miles each way).

I want to get something that will last many years, and allow me to attain speeds of at least a good solid 35mph (45mph would be better, so I could ride on the country roads where the speed limit is between 45-55mph), with my weight, plus groceries (will not be riding fast with groceries!!!, only around 10mph then!).

When I go to work, my weight is around 210, plus my large backpack, which normally weighs around 15 pounds. Groceries will add another 15 pounds, sometimes more ....

So, I need a good quality motor that will easily carry over 250 pounds, reliable, effecient, long lasting ..... I've been checking around on different websites, but am still a bit overwhelmed ... !!! Help please ... !!!! Thanks!
Hi vja4Him;43140
All rear hub motors com with rear gears (cassette), and if they don't, they have the mounting to install the gears (some dealers make you pay extra for the cassette (gears)
how else are you going to get home when the batteries die,
there is no such thing as a rear hub motor that doesn't have a gear mount, if there is, then it wasn't made for a bicycle.
 

biker91

New Member
Jan 21, 2009
10
0
0
Ohio
Can anyone provide any info on the red hornet hub motor? Is it really strong like they say it is? Do you have any pics of it in a 26inch wheel?any info thanks
 

deacon

minor bike philosopher
Jan 15, 2008
8,117
3
0
north carolina
the Ezip is down to 3oo bucks at Wallymart right now. I have it some serious consideration. I have a small hub motor on the way but I came really really close to the zip bike. The reason I didn't was not the motor it was my need for a 20" rear wheels. My balance is so bad that mounting and dismounting a 26" bike is really difficult.

However I think that if I did not have the balance issue, I would have bought that bike with hardly a second thought
 

DOC BOLM

New Member
Aug 21, 2008
681
1
0
Mississippi
Deacon I think they make the zip in a 24.not shure walmart would have one.I have a friend with a bad leg and he rides my wifes ladys 26 with no problem.HD
 

deacon

minor bike philosopher
Jan 15, 2008
8,117
3
0
north carolina
It's not a stiff leg its a balance thing.

I can't really stand on one leg without losing my balance. Add a set of batteries to the equation and it a recipe for disaster. I fell a couple of times on the larger bikes I have tried. One of them I a had an ebike with two batteries fall on top of me.

I can get on a bike with a twenty inch rear wheel without balancing on one foot hardly at all, so it's the only kind of bike I have.

Its a neurological thing commonly called foot drag caused by brain circuits being mashed down. The worst of it has been rewired somehow but I still can't stand on one foot. I'm pretty dangerous climbing a ladder as well lol. good excuse not to paint the house.
 
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toytime

New Member
Mar 20, 2008
550
0
0
Ontario
VJA4Him. It sounds like you want to spend the money for a good ebike. While the Izip or ezip are good bikes for the money, they are only good for an hour, IF you help it along.
On the other hand, Kurt made the bike that may interest you because I don't think you want to spend 1/2 your life waiting for a charge.

Endless-sphere.com • View topic - kurts E bike
 

deacon

minor bike philosopher
Jan 15, 2008
8,117
3
0
north carolina
Since I'm really kind of new to ebike kits I really can only give my thoughts on them.

First of all I gave some thought to what I wanted it to do. I mean there is no sense my buying a kit that is more than I need or want.

So I guess first of all range always comes into it.... Then speed ... and torque I suppose.

Maybe before all that it is about how you plan to use it. I'm retired so it's not a commuter issue. It is a mobility issue though. I want to be able to run to the store for a loaf of bread or home depot for a nut and bolt.

So how far do I need to go?... six miles total should be more than enough. At even ten miles an hour I probably have enough range.

How fast? Ten to 12 mph is fine with me. Even less on a steep hill is okay. I know that if you are in traffic you need to keep up at least a little, but I don't have deadlines so I can pick a time when the traffic is light.

Torque... Ah here in lies the rub for me. I don't live in a flat area. It is some kimd of up or downhill constantly. Mostly they are small but now and then it can be a big one. I had a 250 watt friction drive that actually did pretty well because I could usually get up enough speed to bleed off so that there wasn't a lot of pedaling. I do need to pedal some for my weight control issue.

A short steep hill is better than a long gradual one for that. I expect the bike with the 250 hub to do that but there are inclines that will be a real challenge for me. I will have to wait to get the hub motor to evaluate it. I'm looking forward to it.
 
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ZnsaneRyder

New Member
Nov 21, 2008
163
0
0
FLORIDA
Do these hubmotors have any drag? If I considered getting one, I still want the ability to pedal as a normal bicycle.