Echo, Stihl or SOLO chainsaw engines?

Roadkill

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Feb 14, 2009
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On the saw itself they have a lifetime warranty. I imagine they must be pretty good if that is the case. I have one of these and I also have a SOLO brand floating around. Stihl is almost a hosehold name in the country here in the US. Anybody have luck with these in friction drive kits? I want to get a fleet of roadsters together this summer..
 

Laker

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Dec 6, 2008
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North Woods
The warranty on a Stihl is 90 days for a cosumer and 30 for a pro.I used to do tree work and worked for a Stihl dealer.The power heads last forever but you only run them for a few minutes at a time.They are made to run at full throttle, 1350 rpm for the duration of the cut.Stihl claims x amont of hp but they don't state torque.****,try it.
 

Roadkill

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Thanks.. Yeah I will try anything I can get my hands on once this kit gets here. I have a few 35 and up cc engines laying around and some other experimental "craft" I will attempt in spring. I think Echo has a 3 year warranty. Keep the thoughts flowing.. cheers
 

Laker

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If you can use a motor in an ultra lite then it has consistant torque and cooling.In a woods condition you only run the head for maybe a minute or two at a time and then shut it off and fire it again a moment later.I still have to wonder if you would wind up with a huge rear sprocket for torque.
 

Roadkill

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SOLO's have been around for awhile and were used on ultralight aircraft, they get my vote.
I guess SOLO has double the Stihl warranty and is much lighter as well. I bought a 350 once and the motor needs work. I should fix n fire that one up on my friction drive and see what it does. Time is the worst part of all of this next to finance.
 

knucklepanshovel

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Jan 29, 2009
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personally I would go old school, use one of the big chainsaw motors with some serious grunt lets see a Homelite super XL around 58cc

I know of a Pioneer 600 I could pick up for $25 that is complete with spark but not running that is 103cc there are plenty of old macks as well & lets not forget the sachs dalmers. the macks go up to 125cc & with racing gocart parts & stroker crank you can get aprox 150cc but you can find inexpensive 80cc saws cheaply

there are plenty of saws with some serious grunt in the 60cc to 80cc class & there are quite a few saws over 100cc

there are guys that race chainsaws & with right fuel turn 25,000 or so RPM but thats in more modern saws. but look at the old saws they turn 6,000 to 8,000 rpm but when you crank them they rumble with power.

by the way I have like 20 chainsaws & for big wood I always pick up one of my old saws. but for medium sized wood or just firewood I will pick a lightweight saw for what seems best for the occasion.


.cs..bld..dd.dnut

Randy
 

Roadkill

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Thanks. I guess I will keep scouting them out. I am planning on friction but might expand my horizons once I figure out my mini milling machine and get some ideas together.
 

Laker

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Good discussion.I'll play devils advocate, but I think the chain saw power head idea has merit.Bottom line is that we wont know till someone tries.A few thoughts.The heads were made to move a cutting attachment thru wood.At any given time the cutters were made to have the least amount of friction possible.Reduce friction and you reduce the need for torque.My oldest power head from 1952 weights 27 pounds and looks like a board tracker motor.My newest is 13 pounds and use'es the most friction free cutters of today.Another ration of trade offs.Cut wood or haul bodies,sometimes you do both!!