Decent Bikes To Build With

Rich Allen

New Member
Oct 29, 2021
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I'm going to put a 2 stroke friction drive bike together, I don't want to get a $600 bike shop unit, and I don't want a department store bike( I purchased a Kent Bayside and it was missing crank bearings, I don't like the thought of going 25MPH on that). Any good quality middle-of-the road bikes you guys use? Not a whole lot of decent used stuff lately either.

Thanks.
 

Sidewinder Jerry

Well-Known Member
Dec 19, 2011
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Rockwood, TN
I'm going to put a 2 stroke friction drive bike together, I don't want to get a $600 bike shop unit, and I don't want a department store bike( I purchased a Kent Bayside and it was missing crank bearings, I don't like the thought of going 25MPH on that). Any good quality middle-of-the road bikes you guys use? Not a whole lot of decent used stuff lately either.

Thanks.
I personally would never motorize a bicycle shop bicycle unless it was a stretch cruiser or something similar. Though a $600 bike would be at best an entry level bike. People spend the extra money for added efficiency to pedal power. So one would have to ask why do you need more efficient pedal power if an engine is going to be doing the work?

For building motorized bicycles I stick with department store bicycles.
 

Rich Allen

New Member
Oct 29, 2021
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I'm not concerned with the pedal efficiency, it's the overall soundness of the frame and components, they basically look like 3rd world stuff, will the wheels collapse, brakes blow-off when applied, the frame/fork snap over a bump? Looks like they were built for around 8-10 MPH cruising on smooth surfaces, not the 20- 25 MPH range.
 

Sidewinder Jerry

Well-Known Member
Dec 19, 2011
1,523
362
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Rockwood, TN
I'm not concerned with the pedal efficiency, it's the overall soundness of the frame and components, they basically look like 3rd world stuff, will the wheels collapse, brakes blow-off when applied, the frame/fork snap over a bump? Looks like they were built for around 8-10 MPH cruising on smooth surfaces, not the 20- 25 MPH range.
I'm 250 lbs and live in the mountains. Down hill speeds can reach 50+ mph. My bike is a Schwinn Sidewinder. Now I did replace the rear axle with a cro-molly axle. Changed the rear derailleur from a Shimano Tourney do a Sram X4. I also had to get a Sram X4 shifter; all shifting is done with the left hand. I got a wide seat and a suspension seat post. I also raised the handle bar height so I could ride in an upright position. The frame is a Steel, front suspension and front/rear disc brakes.

I have a triple chainring shift kit on my bike. A heavy steel frame is a good thing in the motorized bicycle community. China is the producer of most bicycles and components even the high dollar ones.

Bottom line is the department store frames are usually stronger because the tubing thickness hasn't been greatly reduced to lower weight. What I'm saying is if you want a nice bike you're going to be spending money on it. So using an expensive bicycle shop won't provide much of a savings.

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Rich Allen

New Member
Oct 29, 2021
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Thanks, I kinda figured that. I'll probably replace the wheels with something sturdier. My vintage Solex moped has seriously thick tires, large spokes, and heavy wheels along with a motorcycle rear brake, and it only has .8 horsepower. I'm strapping a 2.5 HP 2 stroke on the bike, so I want it to be up to the task.
 

wheelbender6

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Sep 4, 2008
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The reason pedaling efficiency might matter on a friction drive, is because you usually can lift the engine and roller completely off the tire while seated. Unlike a chain drive motor bike, you can pedal without any added drag from the clutch or motor chain. No difference from pedaling a conventional bicycle except for the extra weight
 
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