before and after

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle Welding, Fabrication and Paintin' started by sojudave, Oct 30, 2008.

  1. sojudave

    sojudave New Member

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    kindof throwing around ideas for my next proj. Here's one idea. In pic one is a stock limosine frame, and the second is a much better version, in my opinion. I like the length of the frame, I just don't like the height of the bottom part of the stock frame.

    proj.jpg mod 1.jpg
     
  2. sojudave

    sojudave New Member

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    btw guys, go ahead and edit however you want if you want. My taste in bikes stem from my love of classic bobbers and choppers, and by choppers I mean real choppers, not some bigdog pos.
     
  3. stude13

    stude13 New Member

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    it seems the second frame could be cut at the chain line.
     
  4. sojudave

    sojudave New Member

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    the second frame is what I want to turn the first one into.
     
  5. FileStyle

    FileStyle New Member

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    these are how I roll! these 5 bikes , I built starting with the orange one in the spring of 04 and then the red one in the fall of 04 then the green/black one with the soft tail in the spring of 05 then the silver springer in the fall and spring 05-06 then the un finished one (now finished to a powder coated purple) in the fall of 06. what do you think? they are all cutom built frames and forks and triple trees. the green soft tail also has a custom seat that I made. its why I call these FSC bikes (FileStyleCustoms)
     

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  6. lennyharp

    lennyharp New Member

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    These bikes look well built and designed to look like you want them to. I just wonder if you could ride them any distance comfortably and safely. I have ridden bicycles up to 330 miles in a day and worked with riders who could do 500 miles in a day. Now when you put those kind of numbers up the bicycle is no stylized toy but a real tool for fitness and transportation. I look at these bikes and don't think I could ride more than around the block with them unless they were motorized.
    Check some of these records out, one still in the books by my buddy Jim Elliott who was the first person to ride over 500 miles in 24 hours. I supported him when he raced to 3rd place in Race Across America RAAM in about 10 1/2 days coast to coast. A former business partner built the frame for Michael Seacrests 24 hour record drafting behind a big rig truck at Phoenix Internantional Raceway to 1216.81 miles / 50.70mph.
    Ultracycling: UMCA 12 and 24 Hour Cycling Records
    Now that I think about it your around the block FSC bikes make as much sense and maybe more than the ones I have been involved in.
     
  7. sojudave

    sojudave New Member

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    see that's the thing. I am intentionally thinking of chopping this frame because of the fact I want to put an engine in it. If I were to just pedal around on one, it'd have more traditional geometry. My current bike has lowrider forks. I wouldn't put them on a pure pedal bike.
     
  8. sojudave

    sojudave New Member

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    so what type of tubing did you use? Do you have a jig or did you wing it? These are things I don't know or have access to, but would love to learn so I can make my own.
     
  9. Walter F.

    Walter F. New Member

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    Great Googly-moogly Filestyle I didn't know you were that "crafty"!!! They are all nice bikes but can't you hear the red one in the 3rd photo screaming for a China Girl Racin' Engine??? Happy Trails Walter F. PS I posted you a couple clues
     
  10. FileStyle

    FileStyle New Member

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    the bikes are a little heavy, some were made from 3/4" schd10 tubing carbon steel. all were built in a jig that I made. using a laser for a center line, and a bender to form some pieces and a mig welder. all the forks were done with stainless 316 and polished on a lathe. the bikes ride good, however there not good for hill riding but excellent for flat ground and parades and such. they are head turners and thats for sure! they are also for sale. I dont advertise enough though to sell them. what do you think that I could sell them for? what would you give for one? (your not going to hurt my feelings)(c)
     
  11. lennyharp

    lennyharp New Member

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    I would guess $1,500.00 and up for this type of creation.The more stainless and chrome and mural painting and suspensions the more money. A fine finish to welds is also critical. Some welders can get a mig to lay a fine bead like a tig and that would be nice or else a blended bead that is made to look like the metal is one piece. That kind of detail adds lots to the value. Some people would like to do their own finish work and just might buy a rough finished one for less.
     
  12. jak stoll

    jak stoll New Member

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    wow man those are really nice
    it is more then obvious to me that they werent intended to be ridden across country but are really cool looking & a ton of fun Im sure

    I like the short forked bikes around of the turn of the century
    Im using a pre WW2 schwinn frame on mine but I am definatly inspired to do a more custom frame to achieve that look better
    heres a pic of my bike
    its a little nicer now then in the pic you are an inspiration
    thanks for the cool pics
    JAK
     

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