Auto Shifting

LR Jerry

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Dec 19, 2011
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Rockwood, TN
Sadly LandRider went out of business. Ordering replacement parts has become more difficult. Therefore my best option was to design the auto shifter to where it won't wear out as fast.

The primary part that seems to wear is the swing arm that connect the weights to the driveshaft. They look like a roller chain plate but smaller. The holes in the drive arms tend to stretch out causing the weights to become floppy. This then tends to hinder down shifting. Trying to make swing arms from a harder steel would be difficult due to the small size of the swing arms.

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I then decided adding springs to the weights would be my best option. So I disassembled the derailleur and it was to the drill press. I then tapped out for some 6/32 flat head screws.
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I soldered some picture hanger brackets to the screws and soldered springs to the brackets.

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I reassembled the derailleur to try it out. I elevated the rear wheel to where there was no ground contact. It worked great then it flew apart. My heart sank at the sight of the disaster. So it was back to the drawing board.

So I decided to put steel wire inside of the solder kinda of like rebar in concrete.

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This once solder was put over the wire it held much stronger. Well as all things tend to go failure occurs at the next weakest point. A driveshaft retainer clip before the drive pulley.
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So I had a extra shaft pulley which I ground part of it off to where it just had the set Alan in it. I also flatten put the shaft up to the retainer clip line then put a small dimple in the shaft for the inside set alan. So now there wasn't a need for the retainer clip.

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MEASURE TWICE

Well-Known Member
Jul 13, 2010
2,451
544
113
CA
Sadly LandRider went out of business. Ordering replacement parts has become more difficult. Therefore my best option was to design the auto shifter to where it won't wear out as fast.

The primary part that seems to wear is the swing arm that connect the weights to the driveshaft. They look like a roller chain plate but smaller. The holes in the drive arms tend to stretch out causing the weights to become floppy. This then tends to hinder down shifting. Trying to make swing arms from a harder steel would be difficult due to the small size of the swing arms.

View attachment 105951 View attachment 105952

I then decided adding springs to the weights would be my best option. So I disassembled the derailleur and it was to the drill press. I then tapped out for some 6/32 flat head screws. View attachment 105954 View attachment 105955 View attachment 105956

I soldered some picture hanger brackets to the screws and soldered springs to the brackets.

View attachment 105960 View attachment 105961

I reassembled the derailleur to try it out. I elevated the rear wheel to where there was no ground contact. It worked great then it flew apart. My heart sank at the sight of the disaster. So it was back to the drawing board.
I was told that with a mill and a lathe you can make any metal part? Replicate what the manufacture made, but out of titanium or something strong? Or in any case what failed? I mean is solder took weak, silver solder or weld if necessary?
 
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LR Jerry

Well-Known Member
Dec 19, 2011
1,211
117
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Rockwood, TN
20200320_192025~2.jpg

20200804_000755~2.jpg


So it was working again. Problem solved or so I thought. Well the next weakest point came up. The lateral shifter retainer clip failed.
 
Last edited:

MEASURE TWICE

Well-Known Member
Jul 13, 2010
2,451
544
113
CA
I remember when the shift lever on a derailleur bike was not tightened enough. It would up shift by itself slowly. So now I think leave it at a precise amount and add a servo motor to move it to whatever gear is right for a certain speed Maybe a GPS talking to a driver circuit to the servo. Though index shifters when working right are just fine. 3D printer with ABS I wonder if it is strong enough for your parts recreation?
 

LR Jerry

Well-Known Member
Dec 19, 2011
1,211
117
63
58
Rockwood, TN
I remember when the shift lever on a derailleur bike was not tightened enough. It would up shift by itself slowly. So now I think leave it at a precise amount and add a servo motor to move it to whatever gear is right for a certain speed Maybe a GPS talking to a driver circuit to the servo. Though index shifters when working right are just fine. 3D printer with ABS I wonder if it is strong enough for your parts recreation?
Story has a happy ending. Just telling trials and tribulations.