Any Guesses on The Make Model and Year

Davideo

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Feb 25, 2020
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A friend sent me a couple of pictures of antique motorcycles but have no idea of make and model of this one that appears to be made in U.S.A. judging from the name on the mail box.
Antique Motor Cycle 2_InPixio.jpg
 
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Citi-sporter

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Jun 16, 2014
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North Bend, Or,
Looks like the fuel tank says Merkel, the rounded fuel tank ends look like this very well could be a Merkel. It could be a Flying Merckel, it's the V-twin model 884 cc, 6 H.P. a little smaller displacement than the present day small HD Sportster.
 

Davideo

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Feb 25, 2020
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Looks like the fuel tank says Merkel, the rounded fuel tank ends look like this very well could be a Merkel. It could be a Flying Merckel, it's the V-twin model 884 cc, 6 H.P. a little smaller displacement than the present day small HD Sportster.
Thanks for that. Not being familiar with that brand I was not getting anywhere with reading the name on the tank.
 

Citi-sporter

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Jun 16, 2014
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North Bend, Or,
Funny that the horsepower on that old V-twin engine isn't much more than a Predator 212cc. Think back about those antique engines of that era: They largely were running atmospheric intake valves, ( no intake cam, the suction of the intake stroke pulled fuel air into the engine against a weak coil spring poppet valve..) low compression ratios of probably 4:1, rudimentary carbs, total loss gravity or low air pressure drip engine lubrication. Little or no aluminum castings, most heads/ cylinders and pistons were made of cast iron, very slow RPMs probably not much more than 2000 RPM at top speed.
 
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Davideo

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Feb 25, 2020
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Funny that the horsepower on that old V-twin engine isn't much more than a Predator 212cc. Think back about those antique engines of that era: They largely were running atmospheric intake valves, ( no intake cam, the suction of the intake stroke pulled fuel air into the engine against a weak coil spring poppet valve..) low compression ratios of probably 4:1, rudimentary carbs, total loss gravity or low air pressure drip engine lubrication. Little or no aluminum castings, most heads/ cylinders and pistons were made of cast iron, very slow RPMs probably not much more than 2000 RPM at top speed.
That is amazing. Engine design has come a long way from those days. I suppose the Merkle twin was a two stroke and a good 80 cc could probably match its power.
 
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Citi-sporter

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Jun 16, 2014
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North Bend, Or,
That is amazing. Engine design has come a long way from those days. I suppose the Merkle twin was a two stroke and a good 80 cc could probably match its power.
They were 4 stroke, there's a youtube of some guy who motorized an antique bicycle with a replica of an antique atmospheric intake engine of about 200 cc's he built on a lathe. Atmopheric intake engines are really slow turning and there's a lot of inconsistent firing at higher rpms so it's sort of self-governs..