After the Snow Storm

2door

Moderator
Staff member
Sep 15, 2008
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Littleton, Colorado
I originally posted this in General Discussion section but this is probably a better place.
If you live in a climate and a city that spreads sand on the roads during a snow, then plows the streets, all that sand they spread ends up in the bike lanes. Sand and pea gravel can be a hazardous surface to ride on when it's over asphalt or concrete. It's as slippery as ice, well maybe not that bad but it offers poor traction. Be careful.
Tom
 
Jul 22, 2008
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16
Northglenn,Colorado
They assume that bicyclists have retired their rides for the winter. But they are so wrong.
But then again it seems like the bike trails around here get plowed more often than side streets.
 

jasonh

New Member
Jun 23, 2008
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Longmont, CO
I haven't seen a whole lot of sand since the last storm. Haven't really been paying attention to the bike lanes though. Thanks for the heads up
 

2door

Moderator
Staff member
Sep 15, 2008
16,326
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63
Littleton, Colorado
Littleton, or south Jefferson county tends to rely on some kind of red sand. It makes clouds when it gets ground up into powder and certainly adds to the brown cloud situation around Denver. They call it sand but in fact it's more gravel which is why I retire my fenderless hot rod for the winter. It, like my bike has no fenders and that gravel acts like a giant sand blaster on the paint and suspension parts. Not so bad on a bike so I'll keep riding.
I've got an old but very warm leather jacket and ski gloves and with them I don't mind the cold weather. It's the snow I stay away from. My skinny little road tires with smooth treads are no good on snow. Crushed cinders sound worse than sand, Joe.
 
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Technocyclist

Motorized Bicycle Senior Technologist
Jul 7, 2008
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Asia
I guess I consider myself lucky not having snow in this part of the world. Rains a lot though, a little bit slippery sometimes... Always wear helmet... :)