6 Florida MB Registration Questions

Discussion in 'Laws and Legislation for Motorized Bicycles' started by quik225, Feb 5, 2017.

  1. quik225

    quik225 New Member

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    I don't want to invest $600 in a MB and not be able to use it like I want.
    So I have 6 questions.

    1. Is this correct?
    -complete 84490 and Exhibt A forms
    -make appt with local DMS for inspect
    -bring completed MB and receipts for motor and bike

    2. If I get the VIN sticker at the DMS, am I done then or do I have to go to the DMV for the registration?

    3. Is the registration transferable?

    4. Is there a tag involved?

    4. If a motor bike is legal in FL, will it be legal in other states like other motor vehicles?

    5. My plan is to use a 49cc 4 stroke F142 rated at 2.5 HP, will this be a problem with the DMS inspector because of the 2 BHP rule?

    6. My local DMS is in Ocala, anyone have experience at this location?
     
  2. TheNecromancer13

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    I'm pretty sure anything gas powered is a no-go in Florida, but the laws are so convoluted it's hard to tell. BTW the 49cc 4 stroke doesn't produce anywhere near the HP they advertise, neither do the 2 stroke chinagirls.
     
  3. LR Jerry

    LR Jerry Well-Known Member

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    #3 LR Jerry, Feb 7, 2017
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2017
  4. Figment51

    Figment51 New Member

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    Below is what is required a inspection fee of 40.00 is charged rip off as it is the same to inspect a car


    State of Florida
    Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles Affidavit for a Motorized Bicycle Converted to a
    Moped


    I,owner/app licant hereby certifies that the bicycle converted to a moped conforms to all
    applicable Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards related to lights, safety and other equipment
    contained in Title 49, Code of Federal Regulations and in compliance with Chapter 316 Florida
    Statutes.

    In addition to the above, I hereby affirm that the motorized bicycle converted to a moped meets the
    definition in Section 320.01(27) by submitting an Affidavit for Inspection of a Motorized Bicycle
    Converted to a Moped (DHSMV RS 68 - Exhibit Al attached and complies with the installed and
    operationalconversion requirements to meet 316 Florida Statutes, including but not limited to the
    following:

    • 1Headlamp (minimum)
    • 1Stop lamp (minimum)
    • 1Tail Lamp (minimum)
    • Reflex Reflectors: (3 ) Red and ( 2) Amber ( 1red in the rear maybe combined with tail
    lamp/stop lamp) {2 red on side to the rear) (2 amber on side to the front)
    • 1Registration (tag) Lamp illuminating the tag for SO feet
    • 1Horn: audible for 200 feet
    • 1Rearview Mirror
    • Brake activation can be combined or separate; wheel must have a separate brake. (Please note:
    The stop lamp must come on when either brake is applied.)
    • Twist-grip or thumb activated throttle
    • When issued, tag must be permanently mounted (secured with nuts and bolts thru fender, etc .)

    UNDER PENALTIES OF PERJURY, I(applicant/owner) DECLARE THAT IHAVE READ THE FOREGOING
    DOCUMENT/s AND THAT THE FACTS STATED IN IT ARE TRUE. Further, Iagree to defend the title against
    all claims.


    Printed Name and Signature of Applicant (Owner) Printed Name and Signature of
    Co-Owner

    •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

    Signature of DHSMV Compliance Examiner Badge Number

    DHSMV Florida Assigned FLA VIN:---------------------

    Date:
     
  5. quik225

    quik225 New Member

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    Thanks Figment51,

    After reading the link LR Jerry supplied above, I put the thought of a motorized bike on the back burner. I wanted to do a 4 stroke and would have had a minimum of $900 in it by the time I got a tag on it. I decided to take that $800 and put it towards a motorcycle.

    I ended up with a 2004 Suzuki Savage, a 652cc 1 cylinder thumper. It had 5500 miles on it and was clean but needed tires. I gave $1200 for it, new tires/tubes were $160 and FL DMV charges were $180. I was more than I should have spent but now I have something that will keep up with traffic in a 55mph zone.

    I still want to build a MB. Something I can take with me when I go camping, outdoor events, etc. Loading a 390 lb MC in the back of a '84 Dodge pickup is out of the question, a 70 lb MB isn't. I may start a build this winter, if not, next spring.

    Till then, ya'll cruise safe!
    quik225
     
  6. Figment51

    Figment51 New Member

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    I know what you are saying I am waiting for my appointment for inspection I also thought of getting a motorcycle but the DMV wiped my Motor Cycle endorsement off my license last time I renewed and said I would have to take a course at 300.00 I told them I had My endorsement for 30 years and it should not have been removed they said it was a error and nothing they could do If the inspection fails I won't pursue it any further it is who you know here
     
  7. AdvenJack

    AdvenJack New Member

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    If you are using a gasoline engine the rules are different from electric motor rules.
    If you are content to have a maximum speed of 20 MPH and are willing to use an
    electric motor, you don't need to do anything regarding registration, inspection/ap-
    proval, license plates, insurance, etc.
    https://www.flhsmv.gov/courts/latestinfo/ScootersSegwaysMopedsandElectricBicycles.pdf

    316.003 ‐ Definitions for Scooters, Segways, Mopeds, and Electric Bicycles: (2) BICYCLE.--Every vehicle propelled solely by human power, and every motorized bicycle propelled by a combination of human power and an electric helper motor capable of propelling the vehicle at a speed of not more than 20 miles per hour on level ground upon which any person may ride, having two tandem wheels, and including any device generally recognized as a bicycle though equipped with two front or two rear wheels. The term does not include such a vehicle with a seat height of no more than 25 inches from the ground when the seat is adjusted to its highest position or a scooter or similar device. No person under the age of 16 may operate or ride upon a motorized bicycle. (77) MOPED.--Any vehicle with pedals to permit propulsion by human power, having a seat or saddle for the use of the rider and designed to travel on not more than three wheels; with a motor rated not in excess of 2 brake horsepower and not capable of propelling the vehicle at a speed greater than 30 miles per hour on level ground; and with a power-drive system that functions directly or automatically without clutching or shifting gears by the operator after the drive system is engaged. If an internal combustion engine is used, the displacement may not exceed 50 cubic centimeters. (No helmet is required for mopeds if operator is 16 years of age or older 316.211(3)(a)) (82) MOTORIZED SCOOTER.--Any vehicle not having a seat or saddle for the use of the rider, designed to travel on not more than three wheels, and not capable of propelling the vehicle at a speed greater than 30 miles per hour on level ground. According to Florida law, motorized scooters, go-peds, and pocket bikes are considered motor vehicles. However, because motorized scooters, go-peds, and pocket bikes are not manufactured to meet the required federal Motor Vehicle Safety Act, they cannot be registered for operation on public roadways, even if the operator has a valid driver’s license. Mopeds can be registered for operation on public roadways, but an operator must have a valid driver’s license to operate one. Operators of motorized bicycles do not need a valid driver’s license and are not required to register them in order to operate them on public roadways.
     
    #7 AdvenJack, Aug 7, 2018
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2018
  8. javy mcdees

    javy mcdees Active Member

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    non of these opinions of a law that is actually listed as a code/statute/ordinance have anything to do with applying to the state citizen in any of the statutes, Just cause they saw you break a code do not mean it ever existed for them to steal money from you. No place in the code does is say how where why what this code applies to its subjects. Just no place to be found, so By magic you pay some magic dollar amount.
     

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