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Motorized Mountain Bikes and Road Bikes Motorize a full suspension mountain bike to get a smother ride or for a little more speed try motorized road bicycles. This section is for sharing ideas on motorizing your mountain and road bikes.


Genesis 'Two Nine' Mountain Bike

Motorize a full suspension mountain bike to get a smother ride or for a little more speed try motorized road bicycles. This section is for sharing ideas on motorizing your mountain and road bikes.


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  #1  
Old 01-05-2013, 04:37 PM
dimentio dimentio is offline
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Default Genesis 'Two Nine' Mountain Bike

Hey all, I've had a motorized bike for a while now and I usually visit this site for ideas and troubleshooting so I figure I'd sign up. I had a couple of questions about the genesis two
Nine mountain bike. I picked it up a few days ago because I crashed my schwinn beach cruiser into a wheelchair ramp and ruined my front tire, possibly the frame due to the impact strength. I transplanted the motor onto the genesis but I'm having a few problems with the chain and tensioner. The chain is very close to the tire and the tensioner is positioned at a weird angle that makes it hard to stay on track, very dangerous. I also have a custom tension bracket from eBay made by user k.Anderson if you wanna check that out. Problem with that one is, I can't mount it from the inside of the bike frame because the roller will touch the spokes. If I mount it outside it still comes out a bit slanted and the roller is too close to the chain. I tried using a piece of metal pipe hanger tape and wrapping it enough to offset the tension bracket from underneath the mount. It works as a temporary solution but I still feel it is not street ready. I hit speeds of 30 mph on my beach cruiser, but i had a secure tension bracket on that. So anyone got any advice for me regarding my build? I'm using a boygofast motor (black) with all the parts included. I'll add pics in a bit so everyone can see what I'm working with

In case you were wondering, the frame around the rear wheel isn't entirely parallel its at an inward angle so that's why I'm having an improper alignment with the chain and the tension/roller

Last edited by dimentio; 01-05-2013 at 04:59 PM.
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  #2  
Old 01-06-2013, 04:42 PM
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Kioshk Kioshk is offline
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Talking Re: Genesis 'Two Nine' Mountain Bike

Hi Dimentio,

I just completed a successful Two Nine build. Below is my response to another thread. Be sure to check out my album which better illustrates my solution to chain allignment/clearance.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kioshk View Post
Hey gang,

I saw the Genesis Two Nine in my local Walmart about 4 months back and was very impressed with it. I had my GT5 hooked-up to an old steel 26" motorized bicycle from 1990 which had seen better days; my first encounter with the Two Nine convinced me it was time to adjust to the 21st-century. The Two Nine is $200 @ Walmart, but for some reason, the online price for the BLUE model is $170...I suppose it's less popular. In any case, it is identical to the red and neon-green models, and the online price included free-delivery to my Walmart. As an added bonus, the bike ships unassembled. I liked this since it saves me the process of disassembling an inhouse Walmart build, which I would have done to be sure everything was assembled to my satisfaction.

I weigh 280# and am 6'3", the Two Nine turned out to be a good compliment to my physique.

So, I successfully transfered my GT5 from my old steel-MB (for which the GT5's mounting hardware was made), to the Two Nine with a minimum of frustration. The first thing I did once I had it out of the box was to remove ALL the stickers as I think they look silly. The next thing I did was remove the sprocket cassette on the rear (special tool) and then swap the axle-nuts: the left-nut is half the depth of the right-nut. Swapping them moves the rear-wheel about 0.5cm to the right and provides adequate clearance for the #41 roller-chain I prefer (and highly recommend). The mounting-hardware for the GT5 is inadequate for the Two Nine's frame. Although the rear saddle will fit over the seatpost, its incident angle is such that the top of the saddle takes all the pressure, there is a gap between the post and saddle towards the base. I corrected this by packing it with JB Weld before tightening it down. For the front mount, I used the "drill through the frame" hardware that came with the GT5 kit and some bailing-wire (temporary until I get some pipe-clamps. The center-hole of the metal beam that comes with the kit fits well over the bottom "water-bottle" bolt on the downpost, and helps not only to center the engine, but also locks vertically. Here I also used some JB Weld to fill in gaps between hardware and frame before tightening. Yes, I used bailing-wire to hold it down for the time being; that stuff works great if you have the patience to "sew" it in properly.
The Two Nine has vertical dropouts, so this precludes the ability to fine-tune chain-tension. On my previous build, I didn't use the supplied tensioner. You'll need the tensioner too if you have. GT5 and don't have a #41 half-link. I have a half-link on order; and you can see in my pics what a differnce that can make between the need for a tensioner and no need at all. As for the crappy tensioner provided with the kit, it actually works great if you take the time to adjust it properly. The chainstay on the Two Nine is out-of-round, this makes it ideal for the tensioner as this prevents the tensioner from rotating into your spokes. However, the chainstay also bends OUT as it heads toward the axle. To compensate, I needed to twist the tensioner bearing inward about 10-degrees, you can see this in the pics. Everything else was cool; the tank fits perfectly, and the handlebars are standard diameter at the ends, so the hardware fits. The cussions are a pain in the butt to remove, the trick is to roll the ends down about 1/8th and then PULL. My kit came with the CNS carb with the Z-intake (offset), which works perfectly with the NT Speed carb I replaced it with. One downer is that since the tires are longer, my tourque took a noticible dive; next step: larger rear sprocket!

Check out the pics:
http://motorbicycling.com/album.php?albumid=1057

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Old 01-06-2013, 09:07 PM
dimentio dimentio is offline
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Default Re: Genesis 'Two Nine' Mountain Bike

Hey, thanks for the response How exactly did you bend the chain tensioner? Also, which nut is the axle nut? I've never messed with bike wheel internals before... What would i need to do in order to do that? And lastly, you say the bike has a drop in torque. Do you mean a drop in general speed altogether due to the wheel size? I had a 26" beach cruiser that hit 30 mph with this motor (before i crashed it) but this bike, so far that i've seen, only hits about 20. So what would be the best way to go to achieve better speed?
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Old 01-07-2013, 06:24 PM
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Default Re: Genesis 'Two Nine' Mountain Bike

To bend the tensioner, I disassembled the unit and placed the flat-end of the post into a vice, then used a large monkey-wrench to twist it. If you have a torch handy, I'd recommend heating it up a little first, although I was able to do it cold. Be gentle though; you'll only need to twist it about 10-degrees CCW.

The axle-nuts are the two exterrior nuts on the rear-wheel's axle AFTER you remove the nuts that hold the rear-wheel off. My Two Nine came from the factory with a 1mm depth nut on the left-side, and a 0.5mm depth nut on the right (sprocket) side. I swapped these nuts which in turn adjusts the rear-wheel 0.5mm to the right; just enough for adequate #41 chain clearance of those fat 29"ers. You'll need a 15mm cone-wrench and a sprocket-socket. Check on EBay, these tools are pretty cheap...prob run you about $15 delivered, and you should have them in your toolbox anyway. Search on "Park Tools"; the sprocket-socket's ID is FR-7. You'll need to remove the sprocket-cassette to remove the right nut, and properly adjust them afterwards.

Check out this vid for reference:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z2jWd1Wj3b4

My engine also maxed out @ 30MPH on my old 26"er. It wasn't too happy with the larger 29" wheels: acceleration suffered, and top-end didn't feel right; only hit like 22...although I have NOT WOTed it on the Two Nine yet. This was using a 44T rear sprocket; I have since replaced it with a 56T...awaiting extra #41 chain though to fit it. Probably overkill, but we'll see. I'm more interested in hill-climbing and acceleration than speed anyway.
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Old 01-07-2013, 08:34 PM
dimentio dimentio is offline
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Default Re: Genesis 'Two Nine' Mountain Bike

I have a bike computer on my 2-9. I selected the wheel diameter "29x 2.0" even though the wheel itself is 29x2.125 (Not sure if that makes a big difference). I was getting 25-27 on max throttle today. I have a small leak in my exhaust gasket, I'm sure its the spacing on the muffler and not the gasket itself. I'm sure that must affect the speed in some way, it sounds like a harley with that air leak, plus it bogs sometimes. I mainly use my bike to get to work from my house (A half-hour walk, a 10-13 minute bike ride, or a 6 minute motorbike ride) and after that, a visit to my gf's house (1 hour commute, 30-35 mins on motorbike). Btw, I have one of those "boost bottles", they dont do me any good on my old cruiser. It made my motor idle higher and it made it bog more. just putting that out there.
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Old 01-09-2013, 02:16 PM
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Default Re: Genesis 'Two Nine' Mountain Bike

So, the lower crank bearing on my old Skyhawk went last week, and I decided to pick up an X80 from LEB. I installed it last-night along with a new 56T sprocket. The X80 has a larger front-mount; it's slightly smaller than the Two Nine's down-tube, but I compensated for this using rubber-sheet to pack the gaps. The rear saddle fits the seat-tube perfectly. The better fit allowed me to install my NT Speed carb on to the shorty intake plenum. I had to use the provided plenum since the bolt-holes are about 2mm wider that the Skyhawk's. I am really pleased with how tight everything fits, although I am a little concerned about how close the carb is to the jug; it tends to heat up a bit...not sure what impact that might have.

I am very impressed with the X80; it is well cast, and after disassembling it, I found it to be well built as well. It started right up, and purred pretty nicely. I am actually out on the town now for some break-in travel (16:1 for now, and planning 100:1 Saber after break-in). Since I have a 56T on it, the acceleration is great, but I think I'm only maxing about 20 MPH for the break-in; going easy on the RPMs.

I also picked up some #41 chain half-links in hopes of fitting the chain without the need of a tensioner...no dice...still have too much slack.

Thanks for the heads-up on the boost-bottle. I considered getting one, but I think I'll invest in a tuned-pipe instead. Right now, I'm using my gutted stock-exhaust that came with my Skyhawk. The baffles in it clogged with exhaust deposits and severly degraded the engine's performance. Between that and the goddamned CNS3 "performance" carb, I thought I was loosing my mind. I spent $17 on an NT, and used a pipe-cutter and 1/2 drill-bit to open and clean out the muffler. Patched it back up with pipe-clamps and bailing-wire: instant reliable power increase!

Have a look at my gallery, I have a couple of pics of the new engine where you can see carb clearance.
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Old 01-10-2013, 06:10 AM
dimentio dimentio is offline
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Default Re: Genesis 'Two Nine' Mountain Bike

Hey, now that you mention, is there anything I can use to fill a gap between the muffler and gasket? Also, I think a wire-cup brush drill attachment and a 6" extension bar would be perfect for cleaning the inside of a muffler (My black one is internally different from the regular galvanized color motor, making it easier for such a thing)
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Old 01-12-2013, 10:25 AM
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Default Re: Genesis 'Two Nine' Mountain Bike

I use this stuff to replace the exhaust gasket in a pinch, it's like $3 a sheet @ auto-parts stores. It has a cardboard-like backing; I oil it before installation.

http://motorbicycling.com/album.php?...pictureid=5679
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Old 01-14-2013, 10:04 AM
dimentio dimentio is offline
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Default Re: Genesis 'Two Nine' Mountain Bike

Do you think a jackshaft kit would work on this bike, as it is? (Stock)
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