Why didn't my bike go uphill with a 66/80cc cruiser?

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by Panama Jack, Oct 18, 2013.

  1. Panama Jack

    Panama Jack New Member

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    I am a newbie who just got done putting my first bike together. It took me one week! Well, mainly because of the frustration because NOTHING FITS!

    But anyway, I was going uphill and I didn't go full throttle since I am still in the break-in period. The result....The bike stalls! Was this because I didn't go full throttle or because I didn't have enough of a head start to develop speed?

    P.S.>>>>My engine did get a little hot so i was afraid of overheating it since it hasn't been broken in. That's why I didn't want to go full throttle.

    Thanks
     
  2. allen standley

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    Welcome to my world-I say my world because this is a very personal hobby. Ah It is normal for things to NOT fit. Get used to that. Your patience, knowledge, and mechanical skill is critical to bring you and your bike to a safe and happy place together. I don't know your weight but heavy guys still ride and enjoy these bikes which are designed to be low power and only to assist secondary to your legs. I weigh 150lbs last I checked. My steel frame Huffy with worksman wheels is 60 lbs. The Engine manufacturer claims these motors to be at 2.75 horsepower. That's not much. It's basically a 1 speed motorcycle. so the power band is very narrow and tapers at both ends before and after peak (2.75 HP) power. I think you are experiencing the limitations of the motor design. Nothing is wrong-It gets better after break-in. Your immediate challenge is to take care and keep it whole and running all the while keeping yourself safe... You are now involved in a hobby many others have taken on. One hour reading posts on this forum equates to an immeasurable amount of time thru experience on your own. Be patient you are now subject to some painful heartbreak and overwhelming joy. Accept both and good luck!brnot
     
  3. crassius

    crassius Well-Known Member

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    avoiding full throttle during break-in refers to going flat out on level ground - up hill, you can open the throttle more as long as you are not going fast

    once the motor has been run a while, it will get better up hill
     
  4. xseler

    xseler Well-Known Member

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    How steep was the hill? Did you pedal to help? How long was the hill?
     
  5. CTripps

    CTripps Active Member

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    I run a 66cc China Girl with a 36T sprocket... if I don't pedal with it going up longer hills, it will eventually bog out and die. I'm around 165 lbs, the beast weighs in at 84 lbs on it's own.
     
  6. rogergendron1

    rogergendron1 New Member

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    break it in on semi flat roads for around 100 miles .. then pull your top end and look at it ... inspect it ... clean up all the ports with a dremal try to port match everything as best you can... put a preformance filter on your carb ... if your up to the task grind ramps in you piston if not then dont just cleanning up the ports will help big time.

    wash with soapy water coat in oil and reassemble.. run the motor on 32:1 mix and tune your carb as best you can... with a 44 t sprocket you should pull any hill....

    i bet you were running a brand new motor at 16:1 right ?


    check out this thread ..... top end mods to stock parts for more power....

    http://motorbicycling.com/showthread.php?t=51010



    i run only stock parts as i am verry poor ... but i am a good mechanic and have done the mods i listed in that thread ... my bike will do a wheely with a slight pull up on the bars wile twisting the throttle and it will pull any hill, i live in new england there are no flat roads lol ! my bike wieghs 60lbs and i wiegh 180 and carry 20lbs of tools and crap !!! thats 260lbs all together AT LEAST and i can still pop weelies !!!
     
    #6 rogergendron1, Oct 18, 2013
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2013
  7. Panama Jack

    Panama Jack New Member

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    Thank you to everyone! I appreciate the support on this forum.

    I just rode my bike and it seems as if it is getting better. I guess patience is also key, since it is during the break in period. I now pedal to help so that did make a big difference. BUT.....

    I ran into a different problem...The back wheel on my Huffy Panama Jack beach cruiser is loose. I just noticed it. I don't know if the wheel is supposed to be a little loose. Maybe the bearings are screwed up. I have no idea. I haven't taken it apart yet. Just wanted to see if anyone had any suggestions?

    I would appreciate any advice...Thank you.
     
  8. crassius

    crassius Well-Known Member

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    go to the sheldonbrown site & see how to adjust coaster brake bearings
     
  9. xseler

    xseler Well-Known Member

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    ^^^^ This........and also invest in a couple of cone wrenches. They'll be well worth it in the end!!

    Good luck!!
     
  10. Will122391

    Will122391 New Member

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    Remember your power is in high RPMs not low. So you need to be in the upper RPMs (going fast) when you begin climbing the hills. Your engine will not be able to climb its own RPMs from the lower range. There are steep hills in my area and my bike has no problems when I'm going fast/high RPM, but when RPMs are low, it won't climb even small hills. If you are worried about overheating, check your spark plug. If it is oily then you should be good to throttle up.
     
    #10 Will122391, Oct 19, 2013
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2013
  11. FMB42

    FMB42 New Member

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    Exactly.

    Speed is your friend...
     
  12. rogergendron1

    rogergendron1 New Member

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    if you are using coaster breaks ... like me ... you need to inspect your rear wheel EVERY RIDE !!!!

    make shure the wheel does not wabble to mutch... with a cheap cioaster from wally world or sports athaurity ... you need to tighten up that coaster bearing till itss just tight enough to freely spin but not wable and then bolt it back on your bike . you must use 2 wrenches when tightening each nut or the axle may spin and caus the hub to loosten again !
     
  13. bluegoatwoods

    bluegoatwoods Active Member

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    These Huffys are more stout and apt to this task than I would have thought.

    But the rear hubs seem to be a weak point.
    (I ride a Cranbrook. But I'm sure that the Panama Jack has exactly the same components)

    I've had to rebuild my rear hub 4, or maybe 5, times now in 2 years.

    No need for me to clutter up this thread with a bunch of info on that. You can learn all you need by reading more of these threads.

    Just be advised that this is one component that you likely can not keep using for the long run. Though you should be able to keep it alive long enough to make your plans.
     

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