where to buy screws, etc for my bike

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by exdece, Jan 25, 2012.

  1. exdece

    exdece New Member

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    This is my bike, a 2 stroke

    http://img638.imageshack.us/img638/746/1bmf.jpg
    http://img208.imageshack.us/img208/5554/42907022.jpg

    apparently from this thread:
    http://motorbicycling.com/f3/help-identify-my-bike-few-questions-35000.html

    its a 66cc, anyone else able to confirm this?

    Where will I be able to buy all the screws, bolts, etc as when I bought it, it was using plastic wire strips instead of bolts, etc some of the bolts/screws are stripped, and I also want to have extra backup just in-case.

    I don't need a whole new engine, just the screws, and bolts that hold to together, and on the bike

    I just want to buy a 'package' of nuts, bolts, screws, etc for my bike, etc
    I also need to buy a air/oil filter, etc for the carburetor I might just buy a whole new one if its cheap, and I know exactly what type cc my engine is

    Thanks for the help, any is appreciated
     
  2. recon chris

    recon chris New Member

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    If you live in the US. go to a “Fastenal “ they have every screw and bolt under the sun. Plus they have a variety of the same screw to choose from such as: grade 8.8, grade 10, yellow zinc coated, oxidized finish, stainless, and many more . I suggest upgrading all screws (and strips, have never heard of that one before) to stainless steel Allen heads. It will cost under 10 dollars to upgrade every screw in the engine to Allens in stainless. When you go stainless you will never strip a head and it will be one more part on your engine that wont rust over time. Every screw is the same diameter and thread (M6 .1 thread I believe) the only variation you will have is in screw depth.
     
  3. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    Ace Hardware also carries a good selection of metric fasteners.

    I'd shy away from stainless steel for engine mounting fasteners. Side covers, intake and exhaust yes, but stainless isn't a good choice for areas subjected to high stress and vibration. This isn't just opinion but sound engineering practice.
    Tom
     
  4. Ibedayank

    Ibedayank New Member

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  5. NunyaBidness

    NunyaBidness Active Member

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    #5 NunyaBidness, Jan 25, 2012
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2012
  6. recon chris

    recon chris New Member

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    yes 2 door is right i forgot to mention that you should not use stainless for the mounting bolts. I use grade 8.8 threaded rod with an oxidized finish that i cut down to size for my mounting studs. Also found or orderd from fastenal
     
    #6 recon chris, Jan 25, 2012
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2012
  7. DaveC

    DaveC Member

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    While your getting new bolts if you don't have a metric tap set you should get one. The Chinee have a bad habit of short tapping the holes. I think to cut costs. Harbor Freight has a nice set for about $12.

    I discovered this when I tried to put a Pirate Cycles CNS intake on. It comes with cap screw bolts that have the heads ground down to a smaller diameter so that there's more room. When I screwed them in they stuck out about 3/8ths of an inch. I cut them down not knowing that the hole wasn't tapped all the way. Check the cylinder studs, looking for undersized 8mm studs. A SBP cylinder stud kit did not fit my 66cc Boy Go Fast Z80. The Z80 studs were just slightly undersized and the SBP studs did not fit. The holes had to be tapped out to the 8mm size. It wasn't the SBP studs, it was the Z80 that was off. Not only that it had mixed threads with a coarser thread on the bottom and a fine thread on the top.
     

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