What year is this old bike?

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by Russell, Jan 31, 2010.

  1. Russell

    Russell Active Member

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    Bought this at a yard sale 3 yrs. ago. ROADMASTER Cleavland welding Co. Ser.# F21759
    It has a skip tooth chain, horn and light. I will have to repaint it but really hate too.
    Someone put middle weight tires on it but the rims are original.
    Thanks for any help.
     

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    #1 Russell, Jan 31, 2010
    Last edited: Jan 31, 2010
  2. NEAT TIMES

    NEAT TIMES New Member

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    Russ, imho it looks very good as is. Nice bike. ron
     
  3. corgi1

    corgi1 New Member

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    Is the fork leaning back?
     
  4. Russell

    Russell Active Member

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    Corig1,
    Hmmm took a look at the fork it does seem to have a very slight rearward slope. But the picture angle seems to accucentuate it. The chrome fork dust cover is lifted a bit in the front.
    Although I have purchased a new Springer fork, rims and w/w tires. I do want have the original parts right, so I will check it out.
    Any idea what year?
     
  5. bairdco

    bairdco a guy who makes cool bikes

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    that fork is definitely bent. also, check that black line around the top tube, where it meets the head tube, make sure it's not cracked. looks like somebody hit something pretty hard.

    as far as the date, CWC made skiptooths into the 50's, i believe. is there more to your serial number? should have a letter in front.

    my guess is late 40's to early 50's.

    check the "CABE" for more info. (maybe join up and post your bike, too.) Cleveland Welding S/N Project?
     
  6. AaronF

    AaronF New Member

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    Check the wheel hub there should be numbers or letters on the outer casing.
     
  7. Russell

    Russell Active Member

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    Ser# F21759
     
  8. Nashville Kat

    Nashville Kat Active Member

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    Yes, I think post WWII, but before the '60's. Late 40's or early to mid 50's.

    What's the serial number? Sometimes the year is at the beginning. I was wondering about my Peugeot PX10 and had dated it at the dawn of the the '70;s , because it was like the ones I was aware they were selling at that time-

    but the serial number starts with with a 67, and I think it is indicative of 1967 and quite believable- I got the bike in '87-

    after I threw a full-campy Super Record Masi into a front yard in Santa Monica and walked away from it,

    disgusted and tired of cycling in 1985.
     
    #8 Nashville Kat, Jan 31, 2010
    Last edited: Jan 31, 2010
  9. silverbear

    silverbear The Boy Who Never Grew Up

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    Bairdco's advise is sound. Check out the site he gave you as those folks have a wealth of knowledge and someone can peg it pretty close. I would suggest giving long thought to the idea of stripping and repainting it. Bairdco did an amazing job of bringing his old Colson back to life with the original paint. Being black and white, it shouldn't be too hard to touch it up here and there. Not only will you be keeping the bike original, but believe me when I say stripping any bike is a good bit of work and one like yours is more than just stripping the frame...fenders and chain guard can be a lot of work, too. Whatever you decide, its a really nice bike.
    SB
     
  10. Nashville Kat

    Nashville Kat Active Member

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    The paint COLORS are nothing special or sacred, and available if you want to match-

    I'd go with something a little more colorful myself

    other than that, you can get the sweep looks back on it all simply with masking tape-

    thats how I did the tank below- the pegasus is a stencil from an internet photo

    what would be great here would be to turn the frame tank into the gas tank, to have a nice clean line otherwise.
     

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  11. doug713

    doug713 New Member

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    i would not repaint that bike.as original paint bikes become harder to find they become more valuable.you can restore it a thousand times but its only original once
     
  12. bairdco

    bairdco a guy who makes cool bikes

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    i agree with everyone else about not painting it. looking at it again, that paint looks really good, and usually, pictures make it look even worse, so i'm assuming it's better than it looks in the pics.

    the best thing to do would be take it all apart, clean off all the old grease and dirt with WD40, and then wax it with regular car wax.

    unless you're a pro, you'll never do a better job at painting it then the factory did, and it's gonna get scratched anyway.

    in my opinion, if the paint's save-able, save it. if it's wasted, then do whatever you want to it.
     
  13. Russell

    Russell Active Member

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    Well looks like I will stay with the original paint (can always paint it later but can't put the original paint back on).
    Still will put springer forks on and checkout and save the originals. Paid $15 for it and already have $250 in non motor parts on order.
    Thanks for the input!
     
  14. bairdco

    bairdco a guy who makes cool bikes

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    funny, isn't it? you get a great deal on a bike, and by the time you're done (if you're ever really "done") with motorizing it, you've got a huge hole in your wallet.
     
  15. Russell

    Russell Active Member

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    Ain't that the truth.
    But still better than drooling over someones elses ride! (Of course there are so many great bikes son this board I had to buy a keyboard with a built in sponge)
     
  16. hambro

    hambro New Member

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    I got this murray for free, took it down to the frame with sand paper and elbow grease. Bought 40 dollars worth of sandpaper, wire wheel, spray paint. Spent another 76 dollars on new pedals, chain, seat, tires, and tubes. Spent 30 more dollars on two new rims and have a 120 dollar engine on the way for it. WOW!! It didn't really hit me how much I've spent on this thing until I just typed it. LOL
     

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  17. BarelyAWake

    BarelyAWake New Member

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    Yeah, vintage builds are... tricky when it comes to expenses lol, but I don't think that they're actually any more expensive than an equivalent build with a new bike... save labor ofc.

    Much of what gets replaced/upgraded would be the same items where it a new one being motorized - rims, seat, tires, even hubs tend to be the first things swapped out no matter the age of the bike. What money saved by gettin' a old bike gets used up pretty quick makin' it shine.

    I think I've actually come out ahead on the build I'm currently on ('43 Rollfast). While it's defo gettin' pricey - everything I've purchased for it (other than wire wheel & sandpaper) I woulda had to have gotten anyway, even if I didn't because the new bike included it - it woulda cost more initially.

    I suspect that the reason for most vintage builds costing a bit more than yer average is simple - anyone insane enough to go through the process of bringing an old bike back from the dead is prone to also purchasing above average accessories, why get el'cheapo Walmart rims for the thing you just spent so much effort on?

    *shrug* mebbe I'm just rationalizing :D
     
  18. Russell

    Russell Active Member

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    Hambro,
    I love bikes with clean lines, and thy can't get much cleaner than that Murry. When I was a kid, used to take a hike to the dump. Threre I'd load a old bike in my wagon,take it home to work on. First thing I'd do is strip the parts and throw the frame anf fork in the fire when I was burning the weekly papers. The paper fire really wasn't hot enough to effect the metal, but did a good job of removing most of the paint.
     
  19. Russell

    Russell Active Member

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    Barley Awake,
    Yea it seems that no matter what bike it is, old or new $$$$$. However if you added the labor into the equation(mega-bucks).
    I guess that you have to write it off to a labor of love. But what price do you place on the statments you hear over and over. "That bike blows my mind, Super cool, Holy sh**, I had one like that(usually BULL), can you build me one? ect. ect."
    When you have a bike from the fifties, they always bring out some good stories guys my age that I run into.
     

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