What else do I need for the install?

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by DrewFL, Apr 24, 2012.

  1. DrewFL

    DrewFL New Member

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    Got my 66cc kit in the mail today. I have all the basic hand tools to do the job. I am planning on starting the install tonight after work. What other miscellaneous odds and ends will I need other than what's in the kit? I plan on stopping by Walmart on my way home and want to get everything I need in one trip. Thanks
     
  2. dragray

    dragray New Member

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    you will need the following:
    1. Blue loc-tite..use it on every nut & bolt that you can.
    2. replace all of the china lock nuts, bolts and washers with better grade american lock nuts, bolts and washers
    3. a soldering iron, solder and heat shrink to do the wiring right.
    4. plastic wire ties to keep your wiring nice & neat (hide the wiring as best as you can for a clean look).
    5. a chain breaker to shorten the drive chain (or a grinder, a hammer and a punch)
    6. teflon tape to go on the threads for the fuel tank petcock
    7. Lots of patience. do not get in a hurry, take your time and do it right. you may have to modify or even make a few parts depending on what kind of frame you're using. do not expect it to be a "bolt on and go" kind of thing....it usually never goes that easily.
    sometimes they will start right up on the first try, other times, you may find yourself having to mess with the carb a little bit. sometimes the float can get stuck in the float bowl sideways during shipping, which will do one of 2 things. It can either make the carb flood over or it won't allow any fuel to flow into the carb.
    do your wiring right and do not use the kit supplied push together connectors. they are junk and they will fail after awhile.
    you should replace the spark plug that comes with the engine kit with an ngk B6HS plug. Get rid of the spark plug wire and replace it with an automotive spark plug wire with a rubber boot. this will also allow you to get a longer spark plug wire so you can hide the cdi box somewhere. 95% of the time, you see the cdi box mounted in plain sight, right on the lower frame tube. This will have your wiring that goes to the cdi box strung all over the frame, and in my opinion, that makes the bike look like it was just thrown together quickly.

    you have to be able to troubleshoot simple issues without freaking out and thinking that it's junk.
    remember, you're dealing with an engine that is a 50+ year old Russian design, made in china from recycled pop cans and coat hangers, assembled by a guy that probably makes $3.00 a day.
    they assemble these kits as cheap as possible, so they throw in some cheap nuts, bolts and washers, a cheap spark plug and a VERY cheap spark plug wire.

    most of all have patience and take your time....don't expect to throw it together in a couple of hours.
    if you do throw it together in a couple of hours, be prepared for something to fail in a short amount of time.
    This is just my opinion, but I don't know how many times i have read about people saying that these kits are junk. then find out that they assembled them as quick as possible without using better nuts, bolts, washers, loc-tite, or soldered wire connections covered with heat shrink and no knowledge of how to correctly build one of these bikes.
    there are so many things that can and will go wrong, you need to know how to work through those things. you need to know what correct chain alignment looks like, correct chain tension, how to assemble the carb slide correctly, how to do the wiring correctly, how to mount the engine correctly, how to get it to run when it won't...the list goes on and on.
    I know, people have to learn somewhere, but without the correct advice BEFORE they even start building, they rush into it and expect it to be a simple thing to build. I mean it is relatively simple, but it can be built wrong very easily.
    again, just my opinion.
     
    #2 dragray, Apr 24, 2012
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2012
  3. Al.Fisherman

    Al.Fisherman New Member

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    Read this before you remove the engine from the box.
    May save you time and heartache.

    Also take the advise above... It took me 2 days to ensure the engine was mounted correctly and do the mods. I've worked on almost everything from a Vespa to a Dodge diesel. Once completed I have no major down time...built in 2009.

    What type of frame are you thinking to put it on.
     
    #3 Al.Fisherman, Apr 24, 2012
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2012
  4. Bikeguy Joe

    Bikeguy Joe Godfather of Motorized Bicycles

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  5. DrewFL

    DrewFL New Member

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    THanks for advice guys. Great links. I am putting it on an upland beach cruiser frame
     
  6. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    Keep us informed with your progress and we'll be here when/if you run into problems.
    You also might want to use the Google Custom Search feature to find answers to the most common questions about, chain alignment and tension, carburetor problems, pedal to exhaust interference and engine mounting. Good luck, have fun and ride safe.
    Tom
     
  7. Al.Fisherman

    Al.Fisherman New Member

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    To install a engine on a cruiser correctly, a mount (not the OEM) will be needed. Here are some pictures of mounts for such a instillation.
    http://s982.photobucket.com/albums/ae309/Ron-Becker/Engine Mounting/

    75 degrees in the "V" is the perfect angle.
    [​IMG]
     
  8. DrewFL

    DrewFL New Member

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    Well, I got started last night, only to find that the sprocket will not fit over the hub and dust cover. So I am going to figure out a way to grind that down or widen the hole. Which way would be better or quicker. I know there is a ton of threads on this but I don't seem to see a clear answer on which option is best. Maybe a dremel or one of those sand paper drill bits?:-||
     
  9. DrewFL

    DrewFL New Member

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    a change to my above post....The sproket will fit over the dust cover. It will not side all the way over the hub though. Is it supposed to?
     
  10. Venice Motor Bikes

    Venice Motor Bikes Custom Builder / Dealer/Los Angeles

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    Can you post a pic of your hub?
     
  11. Al.Fisherman

    Al.Fisherman New Member

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    I feel the best, although there other ways to solve the problem, is to keep the dust (I see you made a correction) cover intact. I used my drill press to do the trick, as it alleviates the need to center the sprocket on the hub. Just slides over the dust cover. Same thing for the hub should you need too. Don't forget to bevel the teeth, so the teeth don't have sharp edges. Makes for a much smoother chain movement.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_HPtY0OmS8Y
     
    #11 Al.Fisherman, Apr 25, 2012
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2012
  12. DrewFL

    DrewFL New Member

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    Gotcha I've realized it doesn't fit over the hub. And that's the real issue. I am I just not doing it right or do I need to make the sprocket center larger? Sorry I don't have a pic. But maybe when I get home later on I can take one. Thanks
     
  13. Al.Fisherman

    Al.Fisherman New Member

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    The center hole in the sprocket should be large enough to let the sprocket and rubber pads (rag joint) lie up against the spokes. Spokes sandwiched between the rubber. Although in the instruction booklet they say both (rubbers) on the inside of the spokes, why I don't know. I don't like for the sprocket to sit against the spokes.
     
    #13 Al.Fisherman, Apr 25, 2012
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2012
  14. DrewFL

    DrewFL New Member

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    I guess maybe I wasnt accounting for the outside rubber joint? So maybe the sprocket isn't supposed to slide all the way over the hub and against the spokes is what I am understanding now. Correct?
     
  15. Al.Fisherman

    Al.Fisherman New Member

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    NO....in order for the rag joint to clamp onto the spokes tight, you really need the opening in the sprocket large enough so the sprocket will lay on the spokes, so you will know when tightened up it is a compressed fit. You want the sprocket to lay flat against the spokes without the rubber. Then when installing the sprocket, add the rag joint. Does this make sense to you?
     
    #15 Al.Fisherman, Apr 25, 2012
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2012
  16. DrewFL

    DrewFL New Member

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    Ok great. I've got it now. It looks like I will have to make that hole a bit larger. Thanks again
     
  17. Al.Fisherman

    Al.Fisherman New Member

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    Before you cut the sprocket larger, take something like a magic marker, and mark the hole. Cut a little at a time. I used the dust cap to mark in my video. Actually the sprocket itself won't touch the spokes as it will rest on the spoke head in the hub.
     
    #17 Al.Fisherman, Apr 25, 2012
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2012
  18. DrewFL

    DrewFL New Member

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    So I got home last night, and realized that in my tired state the night before I must have mis- aligned or mis calculated for the rubber fitting or something. Without any adjustments everything bolted right up to the hub and spokes. Thanks for the help yesterday guys!. I ended up getting the motor mounted last night as well, and it fits surprisingly more snug and solid than I thought. One question- I haven't hooked up the chain or clutch or anything, but the clutch lever on the motor case seems really loose and swings back and forth with no effort. Is this a sign of something broken inside? or is this the way it is until I hook up the chain and everything? Thanks again
     
  19. Al.Fisherman

    Al.Fisherman New Member

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    It's not the tightest fitting part, it should be fine when the cable is hooked up and both the cable and clutch adjusted as needed. Make sure that the bucking bar and ball are in the clutch shaft under the left drive gear cover. The ball goes in first.

    Courtesy of www.grubeeinc.com
     

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    #19 Al.Fisherman, Apr 26, 2012
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2012
  20. DrewFL

    DrewFL New Member

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    Got it running today!!! for all of 12 seconds...then the chain twisted and broke!!! I have to say that was an extremely fun 12 seconds, and I look forward to doing it again tomorrow. Question, where can i buy a new chain locally? or is it only sold online??? Thanks so much for the help guys!!r.ly.
     

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